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LovesaStout

dubbels and tripels

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Hello All,

When it comes down to Belgian Dubbels and Tripels, does that refer to fermenting 2 or 3 times. and if it does, than how do you do it?

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It refers to the style as well as the OG/FG/Alcahol content.

A tripel is not just a stronger beer then a dubbel, but it's a totally different kind of beer. Dubbels are darker, malty, and hop flavor and aroma is pretty much non existant. Tripels are light colored, stronger (but not necessarily more malty or heavy), and hoppier beers.

What is referred to as a blonde is typically a less hoppy tripple brewed closer to double strength which lets the yeast and malt stand out more.

I do not believe that dubbel and trippel actually refer to the number of fermentation cycles, as you can brew to the style guidelines most certainly without doing multiple fermentation cycles. But you can get higher attenuation if you do it in steps with sugar additions, and this will most certainly change the end-result.

In fact don't think that traditional Belgian brewers gave a rats *(#&$* about the names of their styles, and these style names were more or less "made up" for comparison purposes. Which is why the "Belgian Specialty Ale" catagory exists... just saying...

All that said, my crazy Belgian brewing friend when brewing a dubbel does an all malt wort that starts at a specific gravity lower then his intened OG, and does a boiled candi sugar addition after 3-4 days of active primary feremntation to bring up the OG to the equivelant of the intended value. For a tripel he does the same thing but with 2 candi sugar additions, second addition 3-4 days after the first one. Many Belgian yeasts like this, they will attenuate better with the sugar additions then if you threw a 1.07-1.08+ OG at them to start with. His beers are always awesome if you like Belgians. Just be aware that if you do this you *will* get blowouts as the yeast tend to go crazy.

But again you can just brew them straight up at intended OG, or you could do many more smaller sugar additions and still hit the style guidelines. Some yeasts will do much better with sugar additions then without them, the more the merrier really up until they get alcahol poisoning - and may even get stuck if you try to brew with too high of an OG at the beginning. So you can get very different results for the same beer by doing sugar additions vs. not.

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