Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
conorek1

Liquid Yeast

Recommended Posts

Can the liquid yeast handle the warmer temperatures while it is being shipped? They tell you to refrigerate as soon as you get it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the german ale yeast shipped 1 month ago and my beer fermented well. (I did fridge it asap) I had no problems. Hope this helps ya sir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the most part, very generally speaking, yes.

The dry yeasts from Fermentis and Danstar are more robust against high heat for a few days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its not the best conditions but I have had no problems with it...
some suppliers offer a cold pack for an extra buck when ordering liquid yeast...
my last liquid I bought at a LHBS and he gave me a cold pack with the yeast...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

conorek1 wrote:

I'm in jersey where its been averaging 90's.

I lived in Florida for three years and had liquid yeasts shipped to my house... sometimes they even sat in a box on the front porch in Florida's July/August heat... never had a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

I contacted customer service a couple of days ago regarding the ice pack issue. They said they have not had any issues at all. There only recommendation was to refrigerate right away. If ordering a smack pack I would "smack" before I got my brew going just in case. I have used a smack pack only once, and I smacked first. I am not sure how to check other type liquid for viability before adding to the brew, but I am sure that someone will clue us all in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dferron wrote:

I am not sure how to check other type liquid for viability before adding to the brew, but I am sure that someone will clue us all in.

Make a starter. If it "starts" then it's viable!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read where anything that 'stresses' yeast isn't good because they'll produce off flavors, stalled fermentations, etc. If I can't transport liquid yeast without fear of freezing or excessive heat I buy dry yeast.

I haven't read where making a starter, which just makes more copies of those injured cells, will bring them back to health and work like the original strain did. There's also a limit on how many times the stressed cell count can be multiplied using a starter. If only a small percentage of cells survived you may still not get a high enough cell count to properly pitch your yeast after making a starter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Screwy, you have valid points, but the only way I know of for a homebrewer to test if a yeast is "viable" is to try to have it ferment something, be that the liquid in a smack pack (which is what inflates the pack) or in a starter (which makes krausen hopefully!). If the cells were too damaged to viably ferment your wort then they won't do a good job on the starter either. If the starter doesn't form a healthy krausen then just dump it.

You would a lab to test the yeast cells to see if they mutated. Or just do it the old fashioned way and ferment something with known and questionalble ones to see if you like the results from the questionalbe ones better or worse then the origional ones. (not all mutations are bad, otherwise we woudln't have so many varieties of yeast).

BTW, I have heard of people actually pitching just the yeast scraped off a microscope slide and actually getting drinkable beer as an end result. I'd not reccomend this of course, but yeast can be tougher then folks think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

texasbrewer0069 wrote:

Its not the best conditions but I have had no problems with it...
some suppliers offer a cold pack for an extra buck when ordering liquid yeast...
my last liquid I bought at a LHBS and he gave me a cold pack with the yeast...

i spent the extra buck for a cold pack once and by the time my package arrived the "cold pack" was a "hot pack". never again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dferron wrote:

I contacted customer service a couple of days ago regarding the ice pack issue. They said they have not had any issues at all. There only recommendation was to refrigerate right away. If ordering a smack pack I would "smack" before I got my brew going just in case. I have used a smack pack only once, and I smacked first. I am not sure how to check other type liquid for viability before adding to the brew, but I am sure that someone will clue us all in.

Color is a good indicator. Healthy yeast is a nice light creamy color. If it looks like peanut butter you can give it a try (and definitely use a starter), but don't have high expectations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In short yeast like to be treated fairly and with respect, like most of us do.

We brewers are most comfortable when the temperature's around 68-72F more or less. Put any of us in a steaming hot UPS truck for days and chances are, for those of us who survive the trip, we will be pretty cranky too.

We brewers don't need a microscope or a yeast laboratory in our homes to know that poorly stored yeast aren't going to be up to the task of producing really good beer. That level of yeast research has already been done for us by the Chris Whites and Jamil Zainasheffs of the world and proven by years of documented brewing experience.

'All we are saying, is give yeast a chance'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ordered the American ale liquid yeast for my Sticky Wicket and it looks like its already been activated, I put it in the fridge anyway, hoping it will go down a bit but don't know if I'll use it or not :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...