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Dug of War

Bottled first batch TONIGHT!

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This is my first homebrew and i pretty excited to try it!! :gulp: Just have one question. Would it be alright to to try a bottle after one week or is it best to let it carbonate longer?

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More details -- what are you brewing? When did your start it? What stage is it in now?

I STRONGLY suggest you wait. What you're going to get at 7 days is going to be far less than what you get at day 14 or day 21.

Let it fully carbonate and then get some of it cold and have a good time.

-----------------

Dug of War~

A warm welcome. Enjoy and keep at it.

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Sure, you could try a bottle after one week.

But you'll be sorry you did.

There's a reason that 2 weeks fermenting, 2 weeks carbonating and 2 weeks conditioning is the recommended minimum. After only one week in the bottle, you'll have nearly flat, green beer.

Don't do that to yourself. You deserve better. Just sit tight and wait the full amount of time.

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FedoraDave wrote:

Sure, you could try a bottle after one week.

But you'll be sorry you did.

There's a reason that 2 weeks fermenting, 2 weeks carbonating and 2 weeks conditioning is the recommended minimum. After only one week in the bottle, you'll have nearly flat, green beer.

Don't do that to yourself. You deserve better. Just sit tight and wait the full amount of time.

As a very green brewer, I hate to argue with "The Hat". But, I'm going to anyway! :P

I tried my first bottle after 6 days bottled. And I am not one little bit sorry that I did. The first few drinks were utter euphoria. I made beer! It tasted like nectar from the gods! And then, as I drank more of it, I started to understand what the veterans mean by "green beer". There was just a little "something" there that wasn't quite right. It wasn't horrible, it just wasn't quite "right"

So, I waited three more days and tried another. It was getting better! Only one bottle made it longer than 2 weeks carb'ing. And none of them were cold conditioned for more than 24 hours. The last few tasted very good. And none, not even the first one, were flat.

My point is that I think every new brewer should taste his/her beer early and often. (not too often...give it at least a couple days between bottles) How else are we going to learn the nuances of beer making?

As was pointed out to me in another post, you veterans always encourage the newbies to wait, wait, wait because you don't want someone quitting because they tried their beer green, thought they couldn't make good beer, and quit. I agree.

But, you can go too far the other way, too. When you say there is no way to make good beer in less than 6+ weeks, that may have a similar effect on the new brewer.

This is getting way too long, so I'll wrap it up. Go ahead and try your beer young. But always leave at least a few for longer than you'd like to. It will be better.

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If this is your first batch, try one at 2 weeks (at least give it time to carb). Then, depending on how often you drink, try another in 3 days (or better yet, every week) until they are gone.

Then you can decide if waiting is the right thing to do. It's hard, until you taste for yourself, to tell what time does for beer.

Once you do that, you'll never need to ask again.

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Everyone is going to tell you not to do it because the beer wont taste so great, and that is true. It takes a good 3 to 4 weeks in the bottle to have a good beer. However, I would bet that 99% of the brewers on this site have done it. I have, and i still sneak a bottle in early now and then. I say go ahead and give it a try, it's only one bottle. Just don't expect a great tasting beer. Also, if you taste one after a week, then wait to try the others until 4 weeks in the bottle you will see for yourself the huge difference a little time and patience bring to the table.

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Boe1971 wrote:

It takes a good 3 to 4 weeks in the bottle to have a good beer.

Change weeks to months and I'll agree.

It will take a while to get to that point, and it won't happen when you're using the liter bottles, but get a capper and an additional fermenter (or 2 or 3 or . . .) and build a pipeline.

I like to give my beers 4 months at room temperature and a week or two in the fridge.

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center. You will be assimilated. Resistance is Quite Futile: WE have Beer.

Read the Simple Guide Line and Malt to Adjunct ratio.

As far as drinking it now or later...it's your beer, your taste buds. Consider this, if a majority of the people here suggest you wait, there must be a valid reason. Otherwise, we'd say to get a straw and drink it right from the keg after you pop the yeast in.
Welcome to the obsession, get from this what you will.

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As another relatively new brewer (I started in July this year), I'll agree with just about everything said above. Conditioning improves the taste dramatically; however, part of the learning process is knowing what happens if you 'break the cycle' so to speak. So I say go ahead, just don't let the first bottle disappoint you if you don't like it.

I'll also say that starting a pipeline is a wonderful idea. Now I just need to get the better half to let me purchase another LBK (difficult since Xmas and B-day upcoming).

Cheers! B)

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Welcome! Most of my brews are basic ales, so at 2-2-2 they're fair game, but due to the pipeline, they go longer. The heavier, more complicated hme brews, or brews with adjuncts like corn ... I condition longer. The seasonals I always go around 2-2-4.

If that first one was the standard wcpa, chill it down at 2-2-2, and get something going in the fermenter now. Try a deluxe or premium.
But, the borg is right ... conditioning longer always helps ... to a point. Unless it's a real hoppy beer like an ipa, where the hops are the main feature ... I like those fresh .. the hop character degrades with time.

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If you drink it now it's not gonna be a whole lot better than the taste test I assume you did before bottling.

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Welcome aboard!

We can say to wait and wait and wait, but I know I was just so overly excited about the thought of brewing my own beer that I had to try it after a week. I then waited a full month before touching another one and WOW :woohoo: what a difference!

Sure it tastes much better as time goes on, but there's a big difference between us telling you that and you tasting just how much if a difference letting it mature makes :chug:

:evil: So give in to temptation LOL :evil:

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Guest System Admin

Yea-yea-yea.... better late than never...

Welcome to the Borg!

All good suggestions. It's your brew, do what makes you happy! Just don't be disappointed if it is not everything you expect, you will get better with time and age. I drank my first one early and it was... ok... but now I have a huge pipeline and condition the majority of them from 8 to 12 months. If you think your young brews are good, just wait until you try one that has some age to them. But, most of mine are high OG and high ABV, takes longer.

welcome2-20110924.gif

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From a fellow new brewer, wait at least 3 weeks in the bottle before trying but then only try 1. I tried my first batch after 3 weeks in the bottle last week and it was pretty good. Because this weekend is my birthday, I put the rest of my first batch in the fridge and have tried another. It was so much better, that I have moved half of that back out of the fridge to let condition even longer. I will now try one (I bottled liters) for the next 4 weeks to see just how much better it gets!

My first batch was the basic WCPA and my third was the deluxe WCPA with UME. Being rather inquisitive (and the WCPA with UME was in 12 oz. bottles), I tried the one with UME 2 weeks early (only one bottle). The one with UME tastes better after 2 weeks in the bottle than the one w/booster after 4 weeks in the bottle.

I'm thinking if I ever go with a booster again, I'll let it carbonate and condition for at least 6 weeks. You've definitely got beer but with age can become a good or great beer!

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Slothful_Lifestyle wrote:

I'm thinking if I ever go with a booster again, I'll let it carbonate and condition for at least 6 weeks. You've definitely got beer but with age can become a good or great beer!

Don't hesitate to use booster, I use it. Just remember when using it to follow the adjunct levels, 2/3 to 1/3. 2/3s of the ABV should come from malt, and 1/3 max should come from adjuncts (booster, suger, etc). I usually brew pretty strong with malt, so I rarely go over 1/4 with adjunts. Conditioning for longer periods if you can wait is usually worth it, most times.

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FrozenInTime wrote:

Slothful_Lifestyle wrote:

I'm thinking if I ever go with a booster again, I'll let it carbonate and condition for at least 6 weeks. You've definitely got beer but with age can become a good or great beer!

Don't hesitate to use booster, I use it. Just remember when using it to follow the adjunct levels, 2/3 to 1/3. 2/3s of the ABV should come from malt, and 1/3 max should come from adjuncts (booster, suger, etc). I usually brew pretty strong with malt, so I rarely go over 1/4 with adjunts. Conditioning for longer periods if you can wait is usually worth it, most times.

Very new to the obsession, so I've only gone MRB recipes so far. I can imagine using booster in the future but only if I'm using at least an HME and a UME or 2 HME's. I'm looking forward to the day that I'll be able to expand my abilities.

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yankeedag wrote:

concur your fear and go forth! Steep some grain and go insaine

Haha. I have a few more "basic" brews planned, but that hasn't stopped me from reading up on all grain (and BIAB) and planning ahead :lol:.

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This is fascinating to read. It's like a mini-seminar on the various philosophies of life.

On the one hand, you've got people saying, "Doing X will yield the best results". Often this is followed by their own experiences, i.e. "I didn't wait, and I learned the hard way." The unspoken coda to that thought is, "Learn from my FAIL."

On the other hand, you've got people saying, "You can only learn to be patient by first being impatient and tasting the bitter fruits thereof, so go for it." I guess learning from experience cements the lesson that much more, but I'm just the kind of person who, when he sees a "WET PAINT" sign, has no desire to touch it and risk getting paint on myself just to see if it's true. It was put there for a reason, and I take it at face value.

A third voice is the people who say, in essence, "You're going to do it anyway; it's human nature, so go ahead." The Pandora's Box approach, I suppose.

This isn't just a homebrewing forum. It's a life and human nature forum.

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Personally, I think it's good to at least know what a green beer tastes like. Since my pipeline is depleted now though, I often find myself opening beers before their time, then really regretting it when I taste the huge difference after 2 or three months conditioning. When your beer matures into something really special, you will wish you had more of it.

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