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KanMan

Conditioning Question

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A few other posts touched on it, but I have a general condfitioning question. I know lagers are cold conditioned and ales are either hot or cold conditioned, my WCPA is a few weeks away from conditiong. So does it really not matter whether I condition it in the fridge or not? What are the pros and cons of cold or hot conditioning an ale?

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did you make it with an Ale yeast or a Lager yeast. The Fromunder yeast is ALE. If you "cold" condition the ALE yeast, it will just go to sleep and do nothing.

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condition your beer made with ale yeast at room temp (65-75 ish) for at least 4 weeks in the bottle. Then place 1 in fridge for 1-7 days before trying.

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I'm assuming Ale yeast, it was the packet that came under the lid of the WCPA HME. It's carbonating now, so basically just leave it there for an additional few weeks to condition it? When I make my lager next, I should condition that in the fridge though, right?

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I cant speak for lagers much but would assume you'd want to condition at the lower tems you'll be be fermenting at.

FYI-the the yeast under the lid is know around these parts as "fromunda" cuz its fromunda the lid - get it? ;)

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KanMan wrote:

I'm assuming Ale yeast, it was the packet that came under the lid of the WCPA HME. It's carbonating now, so basically just leave it there for an additional few weeks to condition it? When I make my lager next, I should condition that in the fridge though, right?

Yeah, that's the Fromunder yeast. It's an Ale yeast. Leave you beer in the keg for about 3 weeks at 65~70*F. Then, bottle the beer using priming sugar. Leave in the bottles at least a month at room temp. Then start popping a few in the fridge for a few days and see how they're conditioning out. ;)

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haha, that makes sense...I tried my best to get the lingo down before I started posting on here but I guess I missed a few

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KanMan wrote:

I'm assuming Ale yeast, it was the packet that came under the lid of the WCPA HME. It's carbonating now, so basically just leave it there for an additional few weeks to condition it? When I make my lager next, I should condition that in the fridge though, right?


Even though Mr Beer calls some of their mixes Lagers they are really Ales. :huh: I'm guessing your next beer is Vienna Lager using fromunder yeast. Therefore, you should not condition in your fridge.
To make a real lager, you must use lager yeast & ferment at much colder temps. Then after bottling, cold conditioning is OK, but not necessary.
Ales top ferment, while lagers are bottom fermentors. :cheers:

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It's easy for a new brewer to get mixed up with all the new terms. Cold crashing, lagering, conditioning it's a lot to take in at once.

For Ales I ferment them then bottle them and 'condition' them at 65-75F until I'm ready to drink them. Sometimes I might 'cold crash' the fermentor at 36F and bottle the beer cold, but sometimes I don't.

For Lagers I ferment them and then 'cold condition' them for 3-4 weeks before I bottle them cold and then once bottled I 'condition' them at 65-75F until I'm ready to drink them.

Either way Ale or Lager I let them naturally carbonate during the 'conditioning' time.

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So just to recap: leave in LBK for 3 weeks (I. Leave all my brew 3 weeks in LBK), then carb a few weeks, then condition a few weeks (both done at room temp 65-75F), then pop in fridge a few days or so (mostly to promote settling and better packs the sediment at bottom of the bottle)....taste and go from there......the more conditioning, the possibly better the brew will come out......

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Conditioning beer in the bottle for a month or so is good, but after a 1-2 months I think putting the beer in the fridge better. Cellar temps are perfect for conditioning, but leaving your beer at room temp for months on end will speed up off flavors and oxidation in my experience. I keg most of my beers and force carb, but my beers age great in my keezer. I guess it depends on the alcohol content and style, but putting the beers in the fridge won't stop the flavors from enhancing or changing. For bottle conditioned you definitely need them to carb at room temp, but commercial beers that are bottle conditioned are refrigerated after a few weeks. Just my opinion...which isn't worth much.=)

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yankeedag wrote:

did you make it with an Ale yeast or a Lager yeast. The Fromunder yeast is ALE. If you "cold" condition the ALE yeast, it will just go to sleep and do nothing.

I'm going to partially disagree. The yeast cleanup that an ale yeast does will on;y occur at temperatures above about 60 (and faster in the mid 60s). But cold conditioning has benefits, as well (assuming the warm conditioning is over). To demonstrate this, brew two identical batches two weeks apart. Let the first batch condition at room temperature for a month, then stick a few bottles in the fridge. Let the second batch condition for a month and stick a few bottles in the fridge for two days.

The difference between the two is that Batch 1 spent more time in the fridge.

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Stoutmeister wrote:

Conditioning beer in the bottle for a month or so is good, but after a 1-2 months I think putting the beer in the fridge better. Cellar temps are perfect for conditioning, but leaving your beer at room temp for months on end will speed up off flavors and oxidation in my experience. I keg most of my beers and force carb, but my beers age great in my keezer. I guess it depends on the alcohol content and style, but putting the beers in the fridge won't stop the flavors from enhancing or changing. For bottle conditioned you definitely need them to carb at room temp, but commercial beers that are bottle conditioned are refrigerated after a few weeks. Just my opinion...which isn't worth much.=)

You're comparing crab apples and horse chestnuts. Ask Orr if you don't understand the reference.

When I bottle, I leave them at room temperature for 4+ months. When I force carbonate, It's usually a week or two from fermenter to glass.

And the commercial beers to which you refer are filtered and pasteurized before being force carbonated.

Not all commercial beers use this method. There are unfiltered beers that have been pasteurized. There are beers that are carbonated using the yeast from fermentation. There are also beers that are fermented, then pasteurized and filtered, then given a different yeast for bottle carbonating.

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My ref. in this case was where he said he put them in the fridge to cold condition...at that temp, I doubt anything is going on.

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My Novacaine Barley Wine was brewed in March 2011 and we'll be drinking them in November and December just like last year. I store them in the basement to condition where it's 60-75F year round. So I guess I'm disagreeing with the idea 'they should be put in the refrigerator' if storing for an extended time.

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