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Screwy Brewer

Spent Grain Recipes - Don't Just Throw Them Out

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Since the very first time I brewed an all grain recipe I felt kind of bad just throwing away all the spent grains after I cleaned out my 5 gallon mash tun. Immediately I thought 'what do all those commercial brewers do with their spent grains worldwide?' It was around that time I spotted for the first time YankeeDags post about his now famous dog biscuit recipe. After reading another post today by YD I thought we should start a thread dedicated to spent grain recipes this way they'll be easier to locate when we need them.


Since the veterinarian told us our new Rottweiler puppy will be huge, I figured he will really appreciate some nice homemade dog biscuits and I wouldn't feel so bad throwing away all that grain everytime I brew.

I'll kick things off by asking a very basic question though. When I'm done brewing an all grain batch I don't have any time left for baking. What's the best way for storing the spent grains before baking with them and for how long can they be stored?

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Great topic Screwy this will be used by alot of people.

First off, make sure there are NO hops in the grain. Hops and dogs do not go together.

I would also like to know how to and long they can be stored.
I brewed on Friday and had about 1lb of grain. Unable to make biscuits I stored it in the fridge and have been adding some into the food bowls each time I feed the crew. They seem to like it this way also. After 4 days in the fridge no problem noted with the grain.

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These are great traets for sure. One correction though. Kealia deserves the credit for these ;)

http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=12&id=114188

I read that the freezer is best as they will go sour and even froze i think 2 weeks is best.

I dont have enough time to make biscuits each time and would never use all the grain so I give left overs to my bro to use as chicken feed. they love 'em too!

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i put mine in a roaster pan in the fridge,I was hoping to get to make some biscuts the next day.
But i didnt get to it for about a week and a half.They still smelled great and were a big hit in the house.
The "kids" wouldnt leave the counter where they were kept

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True! I did NOT come up with the original idea for the dawg biskies. I am guilty of talking about them more is all. I do think you'd have to freeze/refridgerate the grains as they will go off pretty quick if left out at room temp. My brew day also includes biskie making time. My 3 hairy hounds wouldn't let me away with out making them.

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This is the one Kealia provided in my link above

Here's the "recipe" if anybody wants to give the people bars a try:
> two cups spent grain
> one cup flour
> one cup peanut butter
> 1/2 cup sugar
> 3 tablespoons of honey
> one egg
> pinch of salt
> 1/2 cup each of various ingredients like almond slivers, raisins, coconut flakes, etc.

Roll out to about 1/4 inch thick and cut into bars.
Bake at 225 for 1 hour, then flip.
Bake another hour.

The goal is to dry them out enough to make them keep, but not so much that they crack your teeth when you bite them.

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I've spread them on cookie sheets and left them in the oven on warm for a few hours to dry them, then run them through the mill at its finest setting a time or two. That makes something almost the consistency of flour and you can use it as a flour substitute to a point. Depending on what you're making, you may not be able to use a very high percentage of the grains, but I always toss some into the mix when I make pancakes and I'll sometimes toss them in with a stew or casserole. I've also made granola with them, but haven't settled on what I consider a good granola recipe. My advice would be to just find a good granola recipe and add some spent grains to it.

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I put away two plastic contains filled with the spent grains from my Witbier mash yesterday. They're a mixture of wheat, oats and barley which should make for some interesting biscuits.

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Monkeyman wrote:

Awesome dog! I've had two rotties they're great dogs, is this your first rot?

Monkeyman he's our first and he is awesome.

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Screwy Brewer wrote:

Monkeyman wrote:

Awesome dog! I've had two rotties they're great dogs, is this your first rot?

Monkeyman he's our first and he is awesome.

They're great dogs. I would suggest a basic obedience class and daily exercise. Rots are a working breed and thrive on work/exercise. If you hike, get a pack for the dog to haul your stuff. A gentle leader is a great tool for training on the leash. Oh yeah, and crate train. Good luck!

If you know all this, than just ignore :silly:

This was my last, zoey:
zoey4.jpg

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mnstarzz13 wrote:

This is the one Kealia provided in my link above

Here's the "recipe" if anybody wants to give the people bars a try:
> two cups spent grain
> one cup flour
> one cup peanut butter
> 1/2 cup sugar
> 3 tablespoons of honey
> one egg
> pinch of salt
> 1/2 cup each of various ingredients like almond slivers, raisins, coconut flakes, etc.

Roll out to about 1/4 inch thick and cut into bars.
Bake at 225 for 1 hour, then flip.
Bake another hour.

The goal is to dry them out enough to make them keep, but not so much that they crack your teeth when you bite them.

Thanks for digging this up. I've done this many times now and throw in whatever I have on hand - chocolate chips, walnuts, raisins, etc. and they always come out great.

I haven't played with the bread yet, but might someday.

I find that about 7 days in the max in the fridge before they start to smell but I've kept them in a freezer bag for months before using them with no issues.

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Kealia wrote:

I've kept them in a freezer bag for months before using them with no issues.

thanks for correcting me ;)

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I'ma try those People Bars. They'd be good for me to carry in my truck for a snack while I'm driving from one service to another.

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Kealia wrote:

mnstarzz13 wrote:

This is the one Kealia provided in my link above

Here's the "recipe" if anybody wants to give the people bars a try:
> two cups spent grain
> one cup flour
> one cup peanut butter
> 1/2 cup sugar
> 3 tablespoons of honey
> one egg
> pinch of salt
> 1/2 cup each of various ingredients like almond slivers, raisins, coconut flakes, etc.

Roll out to about 1/4 inch thick and cut into bars.
Bake at 225 for 1 hour, then flip.
Bake another hour.

The goal is to dry them out enough to make them keep, but not so much that they crack your teeth when you bite them.

Thanks for digging this up. I've done this many times now and throw in whatever I have on hand - chocolate chips, walnuts, raisins, etc. and they always come out great.

I haven't played with the bread yet, but might someday.

I find that about 7 days in the max in the fridge before they start to smell but I've kept them in a freezer bag for months before using them with no issues.

It occurs to me that sealing them in a vacuum bag before freezing would increase their shelf life, as well.

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mnstarzz13 wrote:

Kealia wrote:

I've kept them in a freezer bag for months before using them with no issues.

thanks for correcting me ;)

Was he talking about them smelling after 7 days in the refrigerator after they were baked? Or did he mean the grains smelled after 7 days before baking? It's good information to know after baking up a batch, just how long they'll keep.

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I am sure he meant spent grains, unbaked will last 7days refridgerated but frozen, they would last a couple months. In related news, they last a mere handful of hours in a car in July.....so says my brother :S

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Screwy, the grains in the raw won't last long. But, once they're cooked, they'll last a good while in the freezer or fridge. They kept for 2 weeks just in the cupboard until the mold started in on them. So I keep mine in the freezer/fridge.

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Yeah, I meant the uncooked grains will smell after about a week in the fridge.

Once cooked, I've had the bars in a lock 'n' lock for weeks or months in the fridge (when they get forgotten about) before being eaten.

I haven't made a batch in a while so I think I'll be due when the Christmas break comes along at work.

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I just "throw" my spent grains into the bushes outside my apartment.Just want to see what "happens" when you do something like this.So far...just some "weird" looking grass type stuff...

498_556_thickbox-20111202-5.jpg

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Ok, I just put my very first tray of biscuits in the oven about 5 minutes ago. I mixed all the ingredients together by hand using a large gravy spoon and then sprayed some flour and oil mixture on the bottom and sides of an aluminum baking pan. I think it's called Baker's Dream, the directions say to use it to prevent cookies and muffins, etc. from sticking to the pan.

I tried to use the back of the spoon to spread the dough out as evenly as possible while trying to keep it about a 1/4 thick. So I guess a rolling pin is the next item I need to have handy the next time I bake them.

Of course I had to taste the dough before I started baking and to my surprise I soon remembered that there were rice hulls mixed in with the barley, wheat and oats. I had used the spent grains from my Screwy Witz Wheat recipe I brewed earlier in the week. I've never seen a baking recipe that called for rice hulls before.

What do you guys think, will these be safe to eat for a person or a puppy?

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I've made a few batches of these biskys now, and have tried rolling them, and cutting them with cookie cutters, hand shaping bones... Etc...

Here's what I've found to be easiest...

I put a sheet of baking parchment paper on a cookie sheet... I hand roll the 'dough' into 1-1.5 " balls and lay them on the tray, generally 12-15 per sheet.

Then take a flat bottom glass and press each ball into a 1/4-3/8" thick disk...
( A little of that bakers dream stuff, or no stick spray, or canola oil keeps them from sticking to the bottom of the glass if needed... Most times it's not as there is enough oil in the peanut butter )

30 minutes at 350*F to cook and another 30-45 at 225*F to dry and they're done...

Fast and easy, no cookie sheet to scrub and the puppy could care less if they look like bones or not!

:laugh:

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I just sprinkle flour on the working counter, roll it out, cut them out, lay them on the cookie sheet (no wax paper, no greasing the pan) bake, tada.

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I baked the biscuits at 225F for an hour and then flipped them over and baked them for another hour at 225F. Once they came out of the oven and cooled off I covered the cookie sheet with some tin foil. I remember someone saying to bake them until they're not too hard to break a tooth. When I checked them this morning they are still really moist, should I have baked them longer?

I put them back into the oven now at 350F and will check them in 30 minutes to see how they're doing.

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just pop them in the oven at 200*f for a few hours to dry them out. The 350 will possibly burn them. Once cooked, dry it like you would Jerky.

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Thanks again YD, that did the trick. I've been eating them all day and they are delicious, can't wait to start feeding them to the pup. My next batch will have some raisins and coconut in them too.

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...or almonds and chocolate chips.
...or flax seed and walnuts.
...or.....

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Screwy Brewer wrote:

Thanks again YD, that did the trick. I've been eating them all day and they are delicious, can't wait to start feeding them to the pup. My next batch will have some raisins and coconut in them too.

screwy eats dog food and likes it! :P

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Well the pup are every last crumb of those tasty granola bars, 'er dog biscuits, I'll be baking up another batch today. They also make nice gifts to give out to folks who have dogs or just like eating delicious snacks too.

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Got another batch baking right now, this time I added some raisins and coconut too. These bars are a huge hit around here now.

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Screwy Brewer wrote:

Got another batch baking right now, this time I added some raisins and coconut too. These bars are a huge hit around here now.

If you added raisins, they're not good for dogs. Dogs ahould never be fed grapes or raisins.

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Geezzz, Thanks BP seriously I had no idea. You've saved me from myself and I can't thank you enough! I'll be sure not to feed them to the dogs. Thank you again.

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more beer here wrote:

I just "throw" my spent grains into the bushes outside my apartment.Just want to see what "happens" when you do something like this.So far...just some "weird" looking grass type stuff...

LOL :laugh: You're neighbors with dogs are probably wondering why they're cleaning up so many icky messes. I tried throwing my spent grain in the garden. The dogs went nuts for it even when it was sour. It was not pretty.

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Screwy Brewer wrote:

Geezzz, Thanks BP seriously I had no idea. You've saved me from myself and I can't thank you enough! I'll be sure not to feed them to the dogs. Thank you again.

A few otger no-nos are chocoate, onions and pistachios. I has a list somewhere, but I really don't feed the dog from the table, so I tend to forget.

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I started feeling like a drug dealer. I've passed out a few biskies, and sold some. The dawgz love the stuff, and the owners are starting to ask for more. Their dawgs want another fix. Now I gotta find a "box" for the biskies, and package them. Crikes! zip lock sammich bags aren't good enough.

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bpgreen wrote:

Screwy Brewer wrote:

Geezzz, Thanks BP seriously I had no idea. You've saved me from myself and I can't thank you enough! I'll be sure not to feed them to the dogs. Thank you again.

A few otger no-nos are chocoate, onions and pistachios. I has a list somewhere, but I really don't feed the dog from the table, so I tend to forget.

Also garlic, grapes, avacados and Xylitol (like Orbit gum and many others!)

Here's one list, there are others...


Beverages
Alcohol, coffee and tea can produce serious unwanted symptoms in dogs, risking kidney damage and problems with the central nervous system and cardiac system.

Fruits
Avocados, grapes, raisins and fruit pits can be problematic for dogs by causing breathing difficulties, fluid accumulation in the chest, heart and stomach, pancreatitis and kidney failure. Fruit pits contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs and can be fatal.

Vegetables
Onions, wild mushrooms, tomatoes and tomato plants can cause simple weakness in a dog, or more serious illnesses such as hemolytic anemia and death.

Ingredients
All forms of chocolate and xylitol (a sweetener) can cause serious health problems, including death.

Miscellaneous Foods
Macadamia nuts, salt and nutmeg can have a mild effect of weakness or more serious symptoms such as tremors, seizures and death in dogs.

Considerations
There are dangers in feeding molded, spoiled and fatty foods to dogs.

Warning
If food poisoning is suspected in a dog, make an appointment with a veterinarian promptly for an evaluation.

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Interesting about the tomatoes. One of our dogs used to raid the garden for them regularly until we figured out it was him and roped it off. It gave him a rash, but that was it. It was actually quite a bit milder than the rash our first dachshund got from eating mice, shrews and chipmunks.

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Holy crap I had no idea all this stuff was poisonous to dogs. Do they generally go for stuff that's bad for them? I never really fed my dog from the table either but he got into loads of stuff, including chocolate at least once. I'm sure he must have gotten a hold of some grapes or onions if he had so desired. Sounds scary.

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oly wrote:

It was actually quite a bit milder than the rash our first dachshund got from eating mice, shrews and chipmunks.

why arent they on the list? :blink:

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Just made a double batch this time I added chocolate chips, raisins and coconut. I can't keep up with the demand it seems everyone who's tried them raves about them and wants to get more.

Besides tasting great eating all those grains are supposed to be really good for you too so I'll be wrapping up a bunch to give out as gifts this year.

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