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stealthyelf

Black Lager

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Though technically not a lager as designed, I did Mr. B's Snow Drift Dark Lager recipe as my third brew way back at the beginning of my adventure and remember really liking it. I will note that it got better with age. It really hit its stride after 3 months in the bottle.


Snow Drift Dark Lager-Archived
MAKES APPROX. 2 GALLONS OF BEER IN ABOUT 3 WEEKS TIME.
OG: 1.046 (approx.) -- FG: 1.012 (approx.)

Need something good to drink on a cold winter night? This well balanced, rich and creamy brew will keep you warm and leave you feeling content. So curl up with a loved one and have one for dessert.

RECIPE:
1 Can High Country Canadian Draft HME
1 Can Creamy Brown UME
1 Packet Dry Brewing Yeast (under lid of HME)
1 Packet Argentine Cascade Pellet Hops

It's archived b/c Mr. B doesn't sell ArgCasc hops any more. I think Hallertau or Goldings would be a fantastic substitution. It appears that the hop guide I just looked up agrees with me:


These Argentinian-grown Cascades are not like American Cascade - they have a very mellow and sweet character that reminds us of lemon grass, with herbal, peppery, and spicy undertones. A versatile hop to use for ales and lagers - strangely, with its sweet/spicy aroma this hop would make a good substitute for Hallertau-type and Goldings-type hops, but not a good substitute for American Cascade!

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Could switch up yeast on this also to make a lager too

--- edit ---

Cascade (Argentina)

Alpha 3-5%

Sub hops = Any noble hops

Different than US grown Cascades with more of a spicy flavor and lemony aroma.

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True dat...

Oh, and because I liked this one a bunch, here's the label I did for that brew when I served it at a party...

4392636171_0e6f5195bb_z.jpg

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Noble Hops

Hallertau or Hallertauer–The original German lager hop; named after Hallertau or Holledau region in central Bavaria. Due to susceptibility to crop disease, it was largely replaced by Hersbrucker in the 1970s and 1980s. (Alpha acid 3.5–5.5% / beta acid 3–4%)

Saaz–Noble hop used extensively in Bohemia to flavor pale Czech lagers such as Pilsner Urquell. Soft aroma and bitterness. (Alpha acid 3–4.5% /Beta acid 3–4.5%)

Spalt–Traditional German noble hop from the Spalter region south of Nuremberg. With a delicate, spicy aroma. (Alpha acid 4–5% / beta acid 4–5%)

Tettnang–Comes from Tettnang, a small town in southern Baden-Württemberg in Germany. The region produces significant quantities of hops, and ships them to breweries throughout the world. Noble German dual-use hop used in European pale lagers, sometimes with Hallertau. Soft bitterness. (Alpha acid 3.5–5.5% / beta acid 3.5–5.5%)

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swenocha wrote:

True dat...

Oh, and because I liked this one a bunch, here's the label I did for that brew when I served it at a party...

4392636171_0e6f5195bb_z.jpg


Nice label.

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First, welcome stealthyelf... Although I didn't use an actual MB recipe, I recently brewed the HCCD (High Country...) with the Creamy Brown (basically the Snow Drift, without the extra hops) and it was a favorite at recent Christmas gatherings. Was very dark rich color, but not quite as dark as, say, Guinness Black Lager. Point being, if you are really looking for something that "black" this might not quite be it (but it would taste great!). Not sure how to darken it without turning it into a porter or stout, but I'm sure others here will know...

Again, Welcome, and Happy New Year!!

:charlie:

Tin Man

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Tin Man wrote:

Although I didn't use an actual MB recipe, I recently brewed the HCCD (High Country...) with the Creamy Brown (basically the Snow Drift, without the extra hops) and it was a favorite at recent Christmas gatherings. Was very dark rich color, but not quite as dark as, say, Guinness Black Lager.


Technically you did the Dubbel Trouble recipe... ;)

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Tin Man wrote:

Not sure how to darken it without turning it into a porter or stout, but I'm sure others here will know...

Tin Man


sinamar__32758_std.jpg
linky


;)

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Here is a link to my Shwarzbier recipe that took gold in the 2011 FOAM CUP Homebrew competition. Recipe is on the second page, last post by me. It was a qualifier for the Master's Championship of Amateur Brewing competition. I will be entering the same batch into that competition. It turned out pretty good.

Black Prinz and Midnight Wheat Malt are both good for adding color without adding astringency.

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swenocha wrote:

Tin Man wrote:

Not sure how to darken it without turning it into a porter or stout, but I'm sure others here will know...

Tin Man


sinamar__32758_std.jpg
linky


;)

Wow, that was fast. I knew someone would know how to do that. And about "Dubble Trouble," interesting. With various sales and coupons I bought a ridiculous amount of MB HMEs and UMEs (currenty almost 30 HMEs including seasonals and almost 20 UMEs), so I can play mix and match with whatever sounds interesting. I think I'm going to spend a little time skimming actual recipes again... Havn't looked in a while. Love this obsession! Love this forum!

:charlie:

Tin Man

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swenocha wrote:

Tin Man wrote:

Not sure how to darken it without turning it into a porter or stout, but I'm sure others here will know...

Tin Man


sinamar__32758_std.jpg
linky


;)

Beats the hell out of the shoe polish I was going to suggest. :huh: I didn't know such a thing existed, but having seen it, I'm not surprised it exists.

The other way to darken it would be to steep 1/2 pound of something like Crystal 60. You may not be ready for that yet, but it's an option for the future.

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FedoraDave wrote:

swenocha wrote:

Tin Man wrote:

Not sure how to darken it without turning it into a porter or stout, but I'm sure others here will know...

Tin Man


sinamar__32758_std.jpg
linky


;)

Beats the hell out of the shoe polish I was going to suggest. :huh: I didn't know such a thing existed, but having seen it, I'm not surprised it exists.

The other way to darken it would be to steep 1/2 pound of something like Crystal 60. You may not be ready for that yet, but it's an option for the future.

You need to get ahold of Black Prinz or Midnight Wheat. It is pretty much what Briess made it for. Good in Bmack IPA' as well.

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