Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Violator

No dumb questions just easy answers

Recommended Posts

I had a grade school teacher tell me that once and sure makes asking questions alot easier. So here it goes. I brewed my first ever batch of Mr. Beer today. The standard West Coast Pale Ale that comes with the kit. While following the instructions and watching the how to videos is it possible to mix your wort too vigorously? I used a whisk instead of a spoon to stir everything and it seemed to whip up alot of foam. When I put the yeast in it just sat on top of the foam and didn't seem to do much. Is this a problem? My other question is about temperature during fermentation. I live in a fairly cold climate and we try to keep our thermostat at 66 degrees. The reason being is that we heat with fuel oil and it gets a bit spendy to keep the house much warmer. Any dark closets or out of the way areas might not get that warm. The thermometer on the side of the LBK is about 64 degrees. Should I let it ferment longer or will it be ok in 2 weeks or so? See all easy answers for you guys. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Violator wrote:

I had a grade school teacher tell me that once and sure makes asking questions alot easier. So here it goes. I brewed my first ever batch of Mr. Beer today. The standard West Coast Pale Ale that comes with the kit. While following the instructions and watching the how to videos is it possible to mix your wort too vigorously? I used a whisk instead of a spoon to stir everything and it seemed to whip up alot of foam. When I put the yeast in it just sat on top of the foam and didn't seem to do much. Is this a problem? My other question is about temperature during fermentation. I live in a fairly cold climate and we try to keep our thermostat at 66 degrees. The reason being is that we heat with fuel oil and it gets a bit spendy to keep the house much warmer. Any dark closets or out of the way areas might not get that warm. The thermometer on the side of the LBK is about 64 degrees. Should I let it ferment longer or will it be ok in 2 weeks or so? See all easy answers for you guys. Thanks!

I think the yeast sitting on top should be OK, its just hydrating and gravity should settle it eventually. It would be better to hydrate the dry yeast before putting it in the keg. You just use some clean water in a sanitized cup/glass/jar whatever, cover it up let it soak while you are brewing.

The temp sounds perfect to me for an ale, 66 is good. I would let it ferment for 2-3 weeks to make sure that yeast has time to do its thing . I personally do 3 weeks for all my brews now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the help. I'm sure there isn't much I can do wrong or have a question about that won't get answered right away. I'm really going to try and take my time and follow a set schedule for my first brew. The better it turns out the easier it will be to get the wife on board and order more supplies and equipment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Violator,

I have had that happen occassionally (lots of foam while whisking, but pre yeast-pitching). Did you remember to whisk (aerate) it again after the yeast sat there for 5-10 min? If so, you'll be fine. If not, pro'ly still fine, but the yeast may have to work harder (longer). Usually if I get a lot of foam before even adding the yeast I'll try to use the whisk or sanitized spoon or something to create a little opening in the bubbles so the pitched yeast will make direct contact with the liquid so it can rehydrate easier. Then wait 5 to 10, then whisk again. You can also rehydrate before putting in the keg, as d3EP suggested. You should be fine! Keep reading. Keep posting. Keep brewing.

:charlie:

Tin Man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did give it another good whisking after waiting 5 minutes after pitching the yeast. I'm fairly positive that everything is mixed together very well. I just checked the temperature on the LBK and it seems to have warmed up a few degrees and is between 67-68 degrees. I'm guessing the fermintation proccess will create some of it's own heat. So now I feel much better about this and can get some sleep now. Just got home from working 3rd shift. Good morning to some and good night to the rest of you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

My pre-pitch whisking is done hard to foam it up then I wait for it to settle and lightly whisk again giving lighter foam and pitch yeast (then cover).

I wait 25-30 min then whisk again and foam it up good again before closing it up for the next 3 weeks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeast need oxygen in the early (reproductive) stages of the process in order to synthesize unsaturated fatty acids and sterols to create new cells. If they don't have enough oxygen for that, you may end up with too few yeast cells for a vigorous fermentation and the yeast may be stressed, leading to off flavors. In my opinion, you're much better off getting a good layer of foam, which means you've got plenty of oxygen, so you'll have healthy yeast.

Although the Mr Beer instructions say to ferment between 68 and 72, the yeast can actually ferment as low as 59. It will take longer at the low end, and it may have trouble finishing the job, but the mid 60s are just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

everything has been covered, so.....welcome to the borg Violator :cheers:

oh yea, forgot, get a notebook and use it while brewing, write done everything you did while brewing. additions to the wort, temp OG, what yeast was pitched, etc. you will eventually make better beers because of this and any questions you might have, ask them here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...