Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
AJP

New user, started my first batch!!!!

Recommended Posts

I have been wanting to get into brewing for some time and with the recent deal on Woot for Mr Beer and they are on clearance at Bed Bath & Beyond I purchased 2 kits. I also got a few refills Whispering Wheat Weizenbier w/Golden Wheat, Mountain Raspberry, and Lady Liberty Lager.

I got my first batch going last night, I did the basic West Coast Pale Ale that comes with the kit as kind of a starter. I did a bunch of reading here and watched all the video that drew from crytopbrewology did and gave it a go.

Currently my LBK is in the closet at 65 degrees and I see a bit of Krausen at the top, now to wait 2 weeks, that is the hard part.

Also you guys weren't kidding when you said to stir the booster, it took forever to dissolve.

I figure my next batch will most likely be the Mountain Raspberry for my wife as she loves fruity beer. I also found that if you go to your local recycling place you can get all the glass bottles you ever wanted for free. Mine had no issues with me digging through the glass bin to look for amber 12oz pry top bottles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suggest you get in the habit of leaving in the LBK for 3 weeks, makes for a better beer. Not so much a concern with the standard recipes, but I find it easier (and one less thing to think about) to just let them all go for 3 weeks. Welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

welcome,
i ferment all my batches for 3 weeks.
good luck on your fruit beers.
i hear they can be problematic.
as far as the booster, i turn the fire on, let it warm up, slowly pour/sprinkle and stir like crazy, its not bad.
the more you do the better you will get.


brew-on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AJP wrote:

Ok so 3 weeks not 2? What about the 2-2-2?


I do 3 weeks in the LBK
2 weeks carbing
2-6 (sometimes even longer) weeks conditioning (will depend on the specific beer)
1 week in fridge

Helps to have a few 12 or 16 oz bottles as testers to determine when tour beer starts tasting good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i like to KeepItSimple.
3-6 for light beers
3-8+ for big beers

or 3-2-4
or 3-2-6+

i donot have to take hydro samples.

its your beer.
sounds like you have some more reading to do. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AJP wrote:

Ok so 3 weeks not 2? What about the 2-2-2?

This is the routine I have gotten myself in to. You can do what you want but I'm going to tell you that since I started this routine all my beers have noticeably improved.

First, it doesn't matter if it's a light (color) beer or a dark beer. It sits in the LBK for two weeks, six days and then I take a hydro reading and record the result. Then, on the next day I take another hydro reading. If there is no change the keg goes into the fridge for a three day cold crash.

On the third day of the cold crash I take the keg out of the fridge and transfer the beer to another LBK and I batch prime while it's transferring.

Once the beer has been transferred I bottle it. Then those bottles go into my cellar for six weeks. (That's actually getting to be a little longer in most cases as my pipeline is being filled at one end faster than I can remove - aka "drink" - the beers from the other end. Darn the luck. ;)) Then they are brought up a few at a time and put back into the fridge for a minimum of three days before I drink them.

I know what you're saying, "That's more than nine weeks before I can enjoy my beer!" I know it's tough. I've got porters and Seasonals and pilsners sitting down in that cellar that I really want to dig in to but I can't because they're not ready. But if you get a couple of fermenters going it won't be that long before you get your own pipeline built up so you can be enjoying home brews as often as you wish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

welcome to the borg AJP :cheers:

3 weeks in the lbk, should be the norm when you get into the all malt recipes. for the basic WCPA, 2 weeks in the lbk is fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I generally only ferment for two weeks, unless the gravity isn't dropping enough (or I go out of town or something). Three weeks isn't a problem by any means and I've gone four weeks on occasion. But my "standard" is two weeks.

I also have a good pipeline, so I tend to condition at room temp (basement room, so low 60s) for 3-6 months before putting in the fridge for a week or two.

I used to think that a couple of days in the fridge was enough, but after leaving one in the fridge for a week, I decided that most batches benefit from more time in the fridge.

But now I mostly keg my batches. I don't really condition at all when I keg. I just give it a week or two on CO2 in the fridge to fully carbonate, then tap when it's that keg's turn in the rotation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some Beers I let go for 3 weeks... hwever I do not do all my brews that way... A hydrometr is a valuable tool when brewing...
As you progress you will find what works for you...
I am currenty fermenting my first Cider and it will ferment for 4 weeks...
Yo could get in on th upcoming Collaboration brew to expand your brewing and get to know another "Borg" member as you both brew a beer together..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Pipeline" that was the term I could not figure out on my own earlier tryign to explain it to someone. Now it is part of my homebrew vocabulary hahah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as fermenting/conditioning timelines, you'll find what suits your beers and your particular situation. Personally, I think of it as Fermenter Time + Bottle Time, rather than ferment/carb/condition.

I generally do three weeks in the fermenter, then at least four weeks in the bottle before trying any. So you could look at my timeline as 3-2-2, if you wish.

My point, though, is that most beers will benefit from longer time in the bottle. You'll realize this once you've got a pipeline established and you have a variety of drinkable beers available. Not every bottle is going to go in the fridge right away, and the difference between the first tasting and the last is a real eye-opener.

This is just one reason why I prefer to use 12-oz bottles rather than 2 liter PETs. I can put two bottles in the fridge as soon as the minimum conditioning period is past, just because I'm eager to try it. But the other bottles are still conditioning in the closet, and some of them I don't get to for another month or more. It can make the difference between a good beer and a great beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FedoraDave wrote:

This is just one reason why I prefer to use 12-oz bottles rather than 2 liter PETs. I can put two bottles in the fridge as soon as the minimum conditioning period is past, just because I'm eager to try it. But the other bottles are still conditioning in the closet, and some of them I don't get to for another month or more. It can make the difference between a good beer and a great beer.

remember Dave, they have 1/2 liter PETs now.. i just had to say it because i love them. i can still have 2 beers a night with those ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Instead of adding another thread I thought I would add my newbie questions into this thread.

1. I see a large amount of what I would suspect is yeast at the bottom of the keg I'm assuming this is normal?

2. I have some of the booster left over can I use that for bottling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

broth223 wrote:

Instead of adding another thread I thought I would add my newbie questions into this thread.

1. I see a large amount of what I would suspect is yeast at the bottom of the keg I'm assuming this is normal?

2. I have some of the booster left over can I use that for bottling?

The stuff on the bottom is called TRUB. It is normal. Link

I don't know about the booster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

broth223 wrote:

Instead of adding another thread I thought I would add my newbie questions into this thread.

1. I see a large amount of what I would suspect is yeast at the bottom of the keg I'm assuming this is normal?

2. I have some of the booster left over can I use that for bottling?

Here's a good thread for item #2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...