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Boxerbrewing38

malt question

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I have gotten a hook up through a friend who works at a local brewery with hops and malts so i figured i would make the jump from throwing some adjuncts into a kit and start making the kits with added hops and malt. I was wondering if any of you guys doing anything different than steep your malt and then add it later or do you boil it right along with your hops just looking for some pointers so this beer doesn't become a total bust.

CHEERS

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Are you talking whole grain base malt or liquid extract? You never want to boil any brewing grain, whether it's base malt or color/flavor malt. Base malt needs to be steeped, some grains like crystal malts can be steeped. Make sure you know exactly what you're getting so you know how to work with it.

Cheers!

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Victory malt can be steeped. I'd use maybe 1/4 lb to 1/2 lb for 30 min in 150 - 170°F water.

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OK, if I remember correctly I think victory is supposed to be mashed, but I've both mashed it and steeped it just fine. You could do a steep with 0.25# as a start (just remember this is in addition to, and not a replacement for, any other malts you're using). It will add a bit of color to the brew and a bit of flavor as well. Have you steeped grains before?

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oly wrote:

Victory malt needs to be mashed.

Palmer, Jamil, and others say it can be steeped... Though Beersmith and some others say it must be mashed. I've steeped it before, because Jamil has it in extract recipes in 'Brewing Classic Styles.'

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Hmmm. Just saw Swenocha's post and did a quick search. This is from the online version of How To Brew:

Kilned Malts (need to be mashed)

These malts are commonly produced by increasing the curing temperatures used for base malt production, but can also be produced by toasting finished base malts for a period of time in an oven. Suggested times and temperatures for producing these types of malts at home are given in Chapter 20 - Experiment!

Biscuit Malt 25 L This fully toasted, lightly roasted malt is used to give the beer a bread and biscuits flavor. It is typically used as 10% of the total grain bill. Gives a deep amber color to the beer.

Victory Malt 25 L This roasted malt is similar in flavor to Biscuit but gives a more nutty taste to the beer. Victory adds orange highlights to the beer color.

Munich Malt 10 L This malt has an amber color and gives a very malty flavor. This malt has enough diastatic power to convert itself but is usually used in conjunction with a base malt for mashing. This malt is used for Oktoberfest-type beers and many others, including pale ales.

Vienna Malt 4 L This malt is lighter and sweeter than Munich malt and is a principal ingredient of Bock beers. Retains enough enzymatic power to convert itself but is often used with a base malt in the mash.

Dextrin Malt 3 L Also known as American Carapils, this malt is used sparingly and contributes little color but enhances the mouthfeel and perceived body of the beer. A common amount for a five gallon batch is 1/2 lb. Dextrin malt has no diastatic power. It must be mashed; if steeped it will contribute a lot of unconverted starch and cause starch haze.

But I notice he has listed carapils here, which is definitely something that can be steeped, and he says that in the actual book. Checking now. Will update.

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On the link to HowToBrew above, Palmer has it in the list of steepable grains in the steep chapter...

Ahh... Here's a description I found...

Victory is roasted/toasted and the starches it contains are not already converted to sugar. If you want to gain OG points from the malt then you need to mash it. If you just want the color and toasted flavor it imparts then you can steep it.

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swenocha wrote:

On the link to HowToBrew above, Palmer has it in the list of steepable grains in the steep chapter...

But he also lists it with two row, vienna, etc., which no one would consider steeping grains. He doesn't mention it at all in the same section of the book that corresponds to the quote I provided. I read the Homebrew talk link, which mentioned you can get flavor from it by steeping if you aren't concerned with getting it's extractable sugars, and I saw another link which mentioned that it has no diastatic power, so it won't convert by itself in any event. Interesting. Haven't looked at the Jamil link yet.

edit: whoops, the HBT link was the Jamil link. Pulling Brewing Classic Styles off the shelf now.

edit: Funny. He has a malt chart with a column in it that says "Needs to be mashed, but may be steeped". Sounds a bit contradictory, but there you are. He also says almost the same thing as the HBT link that it must be mashed to extract soluble sugars, but can be steeped for flavor. Dang it, I hate being wrong. :think:

The others in that column are Vienna, Munich, Aromatic, Biscuit, Melanoidin, Special Roast, Brown malt and German beechwood smoked Rauch malt. I'd be curious to know if the unconverted starches in the beer from steeping those malts results in a hazy beer.

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Technically you aren't wrong... You don't get the bang for your buck if you don't mash. But you can impart some flavors by steeping. Interesting... Back when I steeped, I generally included biscuit or Victory in most steeps, as well as vienna or munich. The beer with munich didn't turn out well at all, but I don't know if I can blame the malt. It may have been a factor, though...

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swenocha wrote:

Technically you aren't wrong... You don't get the bang for your buck if you don't mash. But you can impart some flavors by steeping. Interesting... Back when I steeped, I generally included biscuit or Victory in most steeps, as well as vienna or munich. The beer with munich didn't turn out well at all, but I don't know if I can blame the malt. It may have been a factor, though...

Did it affect the clarity of your beer, or did the starch settle into the trub?

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thanks guys for all the advice and no i haven't steeped anything before its gonna be a first try for me. i appreciate all the help thought
CHEERS

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oly wrote:

swenocha wrote:

Technically you aren't wrong... You don't get the bang for your buck if you don't mash. But you can impart some flavors by steeping. Interesting... Back when I steeped, I generally included biscuit or Victory in most steeps, as well as vienna or munich. The beer with munich didn't turn out well at all, but I don't know if I can blame the malt. It may have been a factor, though...

Did it affect the clarity of your beer, or did the starch settle into the trub?

I've never noted any problems outside of the munich beer (which was following a recipe from Clonebrews). It had problems all around (very fruity up front), but it may well have been cloudy as well. I didn't note that, but memory is telling me that may have been so...

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so tom is the big day im gonna try and do the small mash in brewpot and just try and regulate the temp from the stove somehow strain it out and then boil it. when i boil the water with out the malt is that then when i add my sugars and malt extract like your typical kit.


PS. after reading these posts i realize that i know nothing about beer compared to some of you guys lol. I obviuosly need to kick up the obsession and start reading and downloading artcles like crazy. Thanks everyone for the help

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Boxerbrewing38 wrote:

so tom is the big day im gonna try and do the small mash in brewpot and just try and regulate the temp from the stove somehow strain it out and then boil it. when i boil the water with out the malt is that then when i add my sugars and malt extract like your typical kit.


PS. after reading these posts i realize that i know nothing about beer compared to some of you guys lol. I obviuosly need to kick up the obsession and start reading and downloading artcles like crazy. Thanks everyone for the help

Did you get anything to mash with the victory? Sounds like you're really just steeping, and temp control with a steep is not as critical as with a mash (just keep it below 170). I also would not throw the grains in naked then try to strain. For BIAB you would normally use a 5 gal paint strainer bag, but for just a small steep you can use a muslin or nylon sack.

Cheers!

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no i was just going to use the extra standard refill kit i have laying around and just put some extra malt and extra hops i got.

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Good luck, post the full recipe if you want any more input.

Cheers!

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well guys the beer is brewed and i def like doing the steeping process makes you feel more involved and you can get more creative i felt. So here is what i used

1/2 lb of victory malt
1oz hallertau pellet hops
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon (every beer i brew gets this i love the taste is gives to my beers)
1 standard blonde ale kit


i have a feeling i will be building myself a mash tun

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