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Commercial Brew discussion

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I don't see one, but I think this might be a good topic. And maybe even a topic worth pinning.

The discussion of the Borg's feelings regarding Commercial Brews. I'm not talking about -- Budweiser sucks, Michelob rules - kind of discussion. What I'm talking about is more WHY this hobby rather than drinking the mass-produced store-bought stuff.

===============

I'll start:

While I don't really have the disgust that others might against Budweiser...when you look at it, it's what I call a "lazy" brew. By that, I mean every grocery store and gas station with a fridge has Budweiser. It's the same. It's routine. Maybe not 100%, but 95% of the time, you buy a Budweiser in at a Von's grocery store in California and you're going to get the same thing as a Budweiser bought at a Kroger in St. Louis or a Giant in Virginia or a Safeway in Texarkana. Nobody put love into that beer for me. Budweiser (or bigger commercial issues like that) are going to mass produce hundred of thousands of bottles of beer everyday. And 95% of the are the same.

Frankly, I like a lawnmower brew like a Molson Ice. A nice lager with a crispness. And I'll drink those with pride. But 10 beers in, I'm no longer feeling special. Inebriated...maybe. But special - no.

Homebrewing allows me to put a little love into what I brew. It allows me to tailor a beer to my tastebuds. Homebrewing allows me to (when I give some away to friends/family) put my stamp on it. It allows me to put 6-8 weeks of love and attention into that gift. I'm not saying that what I serve is going to win blue ribbons. But This is gonna be the only 8 or 16 bottles of this beer available. Not 2 billion bottles of the same thing flavored-water.

==================

I'm interested to hear other people's thoughts on this subject.

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Why I home brew:
1) I have been fascinated with it since 1978. When Carter made it legal a guy I hung out with began home brewing immediately. He made the best beer I ever tasted. Of course this was in the day the only beers available were Bud, Blue Ribbon, Hamms, Schlitz, Miller etc. Light beers had not been invented yet. Pretty much everything tasted the same. Back then friends in the service would go on and on about German beers.

2) I can taylor make a beer just for my own taste buds.

3) It gives me a chance to exercise creativity. It gives me a chance to learn and experiment.

4) I will admit it. I find it gratifying to get the compliments from my friends who try my beers.

5) Once the initial equipment is purchased it is much cheaper than buying beer. I get premium craft beers for an average of 40 cents a bottle. I enjoy the process of making it so I don't consider that work.

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I'm not an "either or" type of guy when it comes to this topic. I still enjoy many commercial brews. I prefer a good craft brew, but my palate has enough room for just about everyone. It really depends on a number of factors. What am I doing at the time? What's available? Who am I with?

I find it very hard to turn down a beer offered to me by anyone. I don't do the, "Oh. All you have is Coors Light? No thanks then." thing. I primarily drink beer for flavor, but to me there is a real camaraderie about sharing beer with friends, regardless of the brand/style.

Do I prefer homebrew and craft over the macros? Yes.

Will I drink an ice cold Shlitz (60's recipe) or Old Style on a hot day at a baseball game? Absofrickenlutely.

If someone offers me a BMC at their house/party/whatever will I drink it? With pleasure.

I do have my favorites, but I have found very few beers that are completely undrinkable. In fact, I can enjoy many of them because of the company I keep.

Cheers!

:chug:

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GWCR~

Very good answer. It is about the company it's shared with. And more-importantly your enjoyment of it.


Gymrat wrote:

Why I home brew:3) It gives me a chance to exercise creativity. It gives me a chance to learn and experiment.

Gymrat~

I really think this is a great distinction between Commercial and what we do as brewers. If you grab a commercial brew...the most work you put into that was driving to the store. Brewing your own allows us to express our creative genes...so-to-speak. I find that to be a very neat part of this hobby. There are probably 100 or so different types of grains. Various flavors, colors, etc etc. My Pale Ale may be light year's different than your pale ale. And with a cretain manipulation of grains, extracts, hops, yeast or temps I could do something night and day different with the same ingredients. That creative expression part is neat in my book.

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I usually tune out the people who try to sound smarter then you by voicing how awful Bud Light is and blah blah blah, every beer has it's place.

I love watered down beer like bud when I'm mowing the lawn, on the boat in 100 degree weather. I can drink a lot of it and it's refreshing, deal with it. But you're probably not going to catch me drinking it at home or the bar etc.

Every beer has it's place (in meh belly)

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[ol]
[li]I live in Utah. Most beer is limited to 3.2% ABW (4% ABV). Anything above that is only available at state owned liquor stores, where selection is limited and beers are sold by the bottle for $3 and up.[/li]
[li]I like being able to craft my own recipes and learning how different changes affect the beer.[/li]
[li]I'm a cheapskate. I can make a batch of beer for less than I can buy one. If I use a standard refill, it's similar to the 3.2 beer I can buy in the grocery store, but costs less (especially if I buy on clearance after the holiday). If I make something from scratch, I can make a 5 gallon batch for $10-$15 (I buy most of my ingredients in bulk, so LME costs me $1.80/lb, hops about 50c/oz, grains from 50c-$1). So a "strong" beer costs me less than a dollar (versus $3+ at the state store).[/li]
[/ol]

I'm sure there are other reasons, but those come to mind.

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I am going to challenge some of your assertions here as I interpret them. My interpretation may not be quite what you meant to say, so don't take anything here as being critical, just an alternate viewpoint.

First, there isn't anything simple or lazy about brewing a beer in the style of a Budweiser (or other light lager), and being able to do so in a way that it does taste the same in San Francisco as it does in Boston. These are some of the very hardest of beers for homebrewers to replicate. Because of their simple malt bills and light hopping, the tiniest of flaws are magnified. It is a testament to the skill and art of these brewers that they are able to achieve what some might describe as flaws. Second, there is a very good reason that those beers are so popular: they are what the vast majority of beer drinkers want to drink. The BMC's of the world are doing their utmost to please their customers.

That said, I may be completely misinterpreting your post, so please don't take my comments as an attack upon your opinion. Fact is, I much prefer the richer, more varied flavors and styles that are increasingly available to us from microbreweries, and that we are able to brew ourselves. FWIW, one of the most knowledgable brewers on this board enjoys Budweiser as his favorite beer. We are experiencing something of a beer Renaissance thanks to the efforts of a few pioneers that were intent upon re-introducing styles that Americans had long forgotten after Prohibition. Certainly, a large part of the popularity of the BMC's has to do with a lack of exposure to other styles for such a long time; and the fact that the market share of microbrews is constantly (if slowly) growing seems to me to support that. The more people who are exposed to an Anchor Steam, Sierra Nevada or Sam Adams, the greater the market share those beers (and the hundred of microbreweries they inspired) enjoy.

I certainly enjoy the freedom of expression that homebrewing provides, but I find myself really trying to discipline myself to replicate known styles and do it well now, after puttering around for a couple of years. There's a reason why there are certain styles, instead of a great mishmash of unquantifiable beer out there. I'm finding that brewing to style and doing it well is quite a bit more challenging than just throwing a beer together, even if it is a good beer.

Anyway, that's my long winded two cents. :chug:

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Oly--I think you misunderstood what he meant by his lazy comment. I don't think he meant that it's lazy to try to brew a BMC type beer, just that it's easy to grab one off the shelf at the store and stick it in the cart. You don't have to spend any effort deciding what to get or what it's going to taste like because you can get it anywhere and it will taste the same. As you pointed out, that's actually difficult to achieve, especially when the beer is so light in color, flavor and body (it's easier to hide a small mistake in something that is dark, full bodied and highly flavorful).

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bpgreen wrote:

Oly--I think you misunderstood what he meant by his lazy comment. I don't think he meant that it's lazy to try to brew a BMC type beer, just that it's easy to grab one off the shelf at the store and stick it in the cart. You don't have to spend any effort deciding what to get or what it's going to taste like because you can get it anywhere and it will taste the same. As you pointed out, that's actually difficult to achieve, especially when the beer is so light in color, flavor and body (it's easier to hide a small mistake in something that is dark, full bodied and highly flavorful).

I think you're probably right about that. That's why I tried to qualify my reply, but I seem to have a gift myself for putting things is a way that is easy to take in a way I didn't intend (as you've seen from me yourself). Hope I wasn't off-putting.

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USMCMatt wrote:

I usually tune out the people who try to sound smarter then you by voicing how awful Bud Light is and blah blah blah, every beer has it's place.

I love watered down beer like bud when I'm mowing the lawn, on the boat in 100 degree weather. I can drink a lot of it and it's refreshing, deal with it. But you're probably not going to catch me drinking it at home or the bar etc.

Every beer has it's place (in meh belly)


Zactly, as far as commercial beers go I'm a miller highlife guy, I will continue to drink it for the same reasons you described.

I enjoy fuller flavored craft beers when I'm relaxing such as with a meal, after work or watching a game on tv, so my home breed will replace this.

I'm a self reliant kind of guy so I mostly wanted to try home brewing so I would have another skill set to barter with when the zombie apocalypse comes :woohoo: I eventually want to get to the point where I can make a batch of beer where I grew everything in it except perhaps the yeast. The best pots of chilli I've ever had were the ones where everything in it I either grew or killed myself, except for the chilli powder I'd imagine beer would be the same way.

Besides its butt loads of fun.

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Gymrat wrote:

Why I home brew:
1) I have been fascinated with it since 1978. When Carter made it legal

I think this was the only thing Carter did that I like. :laugh:

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All great posts so far, especially GWCR, well said!

Love homebrew and craft but I will happily accept bud with a smile when offered, that being the only available beer. However, I would NEVER order a BMC with other options present.

About the difficulty of Budweiser, etc.. creating the same beer wherever you go.. Its NOT that difficult. It's called mass production. Many companies do the same with any products. The scale and process makes it easy. Now if you try replicating and repeating something with a 2 or 5 gallon homebrew kit, THAT is difficult. So I see why some are impressed by BMC uniform blandness, but it's a whole other process. I mean, its a quality in their beer that's worth noting, but not all that impressive IMO.

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Gluek wrote:

About the difficulty of Budweiser, etc.. creating the same beer wherever you go.. Its NOT that difficult. It's called mass production. Many companies do the same with any products. The scale and process makes it easy. Now if you try replicating and repeating something with a 2 or 5 gallon homebrew kit, THAT is difficult. So I see why some are impressed by BMC uniform blandness, but it's a whole other process. I mean, its a quality in their beer that's worth noting, but not all that impressive IMO.

I think your misunderstanding the point made by OLY, he's saying that if you try to recreate one of those mass produced beers it's going to be very difficult if not impossible. Very few home brewers have the equipment neccessary to produce an exact clone. Not to mention that most breweries use their exclusive strain of yeast that is not availible to the public (This is yet another reason they microfilter their brew!) and without that yeast the taste will never quite be the same. That's not even mentioning the exclusive water and other additions that are made that are proprietary.

With that said I see nothing wrong with people exercising their right to have a BMC. Everyone on this board that turned 21 before the turn of the century was drinking a BMC brew if they wanted beer here in the states. Yes you could get a Heni or a Guiness or one of the other "imports" but they were usually only found at bars and not in the convience stores and you paid a premium for them. Most of us grew up with BMC as our only choice and without knowing better we enjoyed them.

I feel most people that exclusively drink one of the BMC brands do so because they don't like change and they don't know any better. I was born and raised in Iowa and I have several relatives that have never traveled outside of the state! I'm talking grown adults 50+ years old. They say that everything they need and want is within a few miles so why travel farther? They have been eating at the same restaurant, shopping at the same grocery store, getting gas at the same gas station, etc. for all their lives. They see no reason and have no desire to change. If I was to offer them a Stones Bastard Ale (after they stopped laughing and joking about the name) they would politely decline and ask if I had any Budwieser, because that's what their used to.

I guess I rambled a bit, but I'm pretty much with everyone else here. I've never met a beer that I would turn down and I don't think I ever will!!!! ;)

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Thanks guys...this is good discussion fodder.

In regard to Oly's post...here's what I mean by lazy...I wasn't specifically tasting about the skill in making something like that because I do agree with you that if you're going to brew 2,000,000 bottles of something exactly the same, you have to be precise. And that takes skill.

But what I mean is exactly along those same lines. it's mass-produced. If you're going to make 2 million bottles of anything without a spec of difference between any of those bottles...it's harder for me to identify the love put into each one. It may be possible, but I doubt that there is attention to every bottle. There is probably a machine putting a set amount of priming sugar. There is a machine calculating the grain ratio and mixing the ingredients and then mass producing it. I'm sure the details and specifications are attuned to an exact degree...but once it's input, by and large it's a computer system of sorts thrust into "making" my beer.

The "lazy" comment may be a poor-choice of words. But it's the only word I can think of to differentiate the care and attention dedicate to a small handful of beers versus 2 billion identical bottles. I'm not picking apart skill. I agree with your thought there. Just the mass-production part...which, I FEEL by it's very nature becomes more mechanical and less "human".

============

This past fall, Newcastle had a special release called WEREWOLF. I tried it at a beer-fest and I enjoyed it so much. But it was hard to find. It wasn't available at every grocery store and pharmacy I go into. And now it's out-of-season so I can't find it period. But I really, really want it. It takes effort and it makes my appreciation of that beer even moreso.

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I definitely get you there. It's good to feel the love with a well crafted micro.

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Hello fellow brewers!

Just thought I'd pipe in with my thoughts on commercial brews. I like them. Some of my favorites are Guiness, Spaten, and Pilsner Urquell. As far as the U.S. commercial brews go, I'd rather not spend my hard earned greenbacks on them.

I do routinely brew similar American Lager & Pilsner styles, incorporating the adjucts rice or corn, except I double or triple the hops from the style guidelines. Classic American styles are not my favorite, but they have a place, and if you're a hop head like me it's possible to make a watered down guzzeler even your homebrew club buddies will appreciate as a fine lawnmower beer.

Cheers!

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Yeah, I may have had a beer or two before I was 21...guilty as charged.

I've never been able to drink Budweiser. I never liked it from a keg, bottle or otherwise. Something about it is just "off" to me. I started drinking Keystone light in college (to get drunk). I used to drink MGD as well as Coors Light.

In my early 20's I had my first micro-brew: Pete's Wicked Ale and was hooked from that point on. I LOVED it. I couldn't wait for winter for Pete's Wicked Winter Ale to come out and I bought a couple of sixers when it did.

I used to drink 1 beer a week for quite a while and then went through a period where I didn't drink at all. Not a conscious choice to NOT drink, I just realized (more so now) that I just didn't find anything that I REALLY liked.

Once I found home brewing I found that I could brew beer exactly (ok, close!) to how I wanted it. Malty in some cases, strong hop aroma and flavor in others, but never overly bitter. Since I've started brewing I drink more because I REALLY like what I've made.

I also have learned to expand my horizons in tasting other styles and I find that I am more willing to taste a wider variety of beers since I started brewing. I've always appreciated a good craft beer and likely always will (assuming it's a style I like).

If I'm out to dinner or elsewhere I won't spend the money on a BMC because I just don't feel the NEED to drink SOMETHING. If I'm at a party or friend's house, etc. I'll accept most things they have if I feel like having a beer but I'll still turn up my nose at a few like Bud. Not because I think I'm *above* drinking one - just because I don't like it. There are still some BMCs that I will drink in that instance (Coors Light, MGD, Corona) but I won't buy one if I'm out and about.

Damn, am I still on topic? :huh:

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bpgreen wrote:

Long time no see, Sweetluu. Welcome back.

Good to see you're still here. :chug:

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Last night I met my kids for dinner at a local bar and restaurant that serves really great food and craft beer on tap. My oldest orders a can of PBR!!? I didn't say a word because number one he was paying for it and number two it's what he really likes. We all had a good time, ate some really good food and went home happy.

Before I started brewing my own beer I drank Budweiser, Bass Ale and a few other commercial beers and thought nothing of it. Now during those dry spells when my pipeline runs out of 'beer ready to drink' I'll pick up a 30 of PBR in a pinch or a case of SNPA if I need some extra beer bottles.

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I like commercial beer. I was drinking beer a few years before I turned 21, quite heavily at times. I really like Guinness, but I'll drink pretty much anything you can find in your average grocery store beer section. I just enjoy beer, period. When I was about 15 I visited family in Germany and had a beer called Zirndorfer. I'm 26 now and in that time I have not found a beer I enjoyed more than that beer. My uncle still brings me a few bottles every time they come to visit. I've never had a home brewed beer before though. Can't wait to try my first one...

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I think the main reason I like to homebrew is because I like to make things myself. I bought a house in forclosure and rehabed it back into shape. I am also a bit of a car nut and have built many hot rods low-riders and one off cars that are cool for a while. I think there is a sense of pride when you have something that you made whith your own hands. My wife gets mad at me because I dislike going to restaurants because I feel as though I can make my own food. It is kind of the same thing with beer for me. I want to be able to make my own things with my own hands. And yes I still take my wife out to eat at least once a month :P

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I like homebrew for the same reason I like home cooking, & making my own coffee, etc. Tastes great, & I'm proud of it. That being said, I do enjoy drinking commercial beer, mostly local ales from the NW. My wife says I became a beer snob around twenty years ago, when I stopped buying BMC products, and began buying locally made microbrews... I grew up in a city with a large Anheuser Busch brewery(east coast), so we drank Budweiser & Busch, way back in the twentieth century.

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I absoluty love craft beer. With that being said I can drink just about anything even today. My tastes buds have grown up a lot but I have still been known to drink Natural Light if the object of that night or drinking is to get drunk.

I do not think I will ever be able to become a "beer snob".

Peace Love and Johnny Cash

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Dustin wrote:

I absoluty love craft beer. With that being said I can drink just about anything even today. My tastes buds have grown up a lot but I have still been known to drink Natural Light if the object of that night or drinking is to get drunk.

I do not think I will ever be able to become a "beer snob".

Peace Love and Johnny Cash

If the object is to get drunk I find something with some alcohol content to it :gulp: Your not going to find much of an ABV in a Natural Light.

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personally Screwy, SNPA is a craft beer in my book. however, before i even knew they existed, i drank MGD only. i will say it has a nice kick in the teeth, and i am a hop head. i wont drink bud or coors at all (beer snob, i dont think so). but others can do as they please. i wont condem. but i wont drink them at all.

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I've definitely become more of a beer snob but a group of friends who happen to like good beer like I do, help perpetuate it.
In my youth I drank the cheapest beer I could get but that was for a buzz. I enjoy beer now for the awesome taste.
My son's in a fraternity and they buy literally pallets of Natty Light.

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First off, awesome topic idea!

I feel like I can bring a different perspective than a lot of the posters on here. I'm 22 years old, have been attending a large, public, state university, and have lived in Texas all my life. This combination of traits has given me two competing experiences in the last few years of my life:

1) Lots and lots of "drink to get drunk" beer for beer pong, shotgunning, and other common college activities, and
2) The recent availability of really good craft beers at my neighborhood grocery store.

I am also a very adventurous person when it comes to food and drink, and so I was sampling every category of beer from ciders to stouts to DIPAS when most of my peers still thought Sam Adams was a "beer snob" brewery. This curiosity has pretty naturally extended into the homebrew scene (very recently in my case), as I like to understand the 'why?' behind things and to tinker with processes myself.

Now having said that, there is one thing that I think the BCM (I'm assuming this is short for Bud-Coors-Miller, if not please feel free to correct me) companies do extremely well is produce consistency. Someone brought up the example of buying a case of Bud Light in two different geographic regions and having them taste the same. This, to me, is the true value of macro-breweries - knowing EXACTLY what you're going to get, every time. That's why a significant percent of my beer expenses go toward buying Bud Light. It's cheap, consistent, and perfect for certain situations (cooling off in 100 degree weather, chugging in beer pong, etc).

The difference between a "beer snob" and someone who is knowledgeable and worldly when it comes to beer is understanding that all types of beer have their place. I'll drink a bud light at a house party or if I'm offered one, but I'll drink something like Stone Ruination or Young's Double Choc. Stout if I'm just relaxing or at the pub.*

My $0.02!

------------

* There are two exceptions to this - PBR is delicious for how cheap it is and so I'll sometimes actually choose it, and Shiner Bock is a Texas favorite and I'm loyal to that brewery. ;)

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I find the macros to be rather bland. A few weeks ago, at bowling, I started off with a Miller Genuine Draft. Okay, it wasn't bad, but as I said to my brother, "It tastes like High School." It's the kind of beer (along with Bud and Coors) that I drank when I was learning to drink beer.

Before I started brewing, I drank mostly Samuel Adams, because it had body and flavor that I didn't find in BMC.

Since brewing, I still buy commercial beers now and then, especially Boston Brewery's Special Edition beers, because I know the quality is going to be good. Or perhaps a Pilsner Urquell if I'm in the mood for a high quality pils. Or Bass Ale, if it strikes me. Because I'm all about the flavor of certain styles. For me, the BMCs are more or less generic beers, designed, brewed, and marketed for the lowest common denominator. That's not the type of beer I want.

As far as why I brew, I'm making good beer. It exercises and satisfies my creativity. It's something I know I can call mine. It's my therapy.

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Well, I guess you can call me a snob but...

Ever since I started drinking I couldn't stand macros. Not because I knew of anything better but because my body just plain rejected the taste. I finally started drinking beer when I worked and a brewery/restaurant called Ham's (mmmmmm Charley's Barley). Their beer wasn't the best thing I have had now but at the time it opened me to a whole new world of alcoholic beverages.

I remember the early college days when my friends would try to get me to drink 40's of high life or cans of natty...that stuff really looks and tastes like piss, and thats being generious.

I have no problem with other people drinking whatever they want. I will never complain about others drinking "bad" beer but thats stuff will never enter my stomache again.

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Although I do not consider myself a beer snob, I have been labeled one by friends and family. Why? Because at family gatherings, I usually bring my own beer (either something I brewed or any number of craft beers)to drink instead of drinking what is normally offered, BMC beers. Even before craft beers came along, I was never been a fan of the BMC beers because they never really tasted great to me but I will drink them.
I brew because I love to. I can drink something I created and to me too, its great therapy.
I have been to a few different breweries like, Budweiser in St Louis, Miller Brewing in Milwaukee and Yeungling in PA because I enjoy seeing the process. I appreciate what they do, in the quantities they do it in and the consistency the keep.
I like craft beers like, Sam Adams, Sierra Nevada, Dogfishhead and the like more I think because I know they started out as homebrewers and I can taste the love that they put into their beers.

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I too have been labeled a beer snob by my oldest brother because I no longer drink Miller Lite like he does. It started when I toured the Leinenkugel's brewery in Chippewa Falls, Wi. Yes, I know they are owned by Miller and SAB, but it was a step in the right direction. I then started homebrewing and trying new styles from New Glarus, Sierra Nevada, and others. I guess my point is I consider myself not a beer snob, but a beer enthusiast. All beers have there place. In my refridgerator right now is some Leinie's Original right next to the Sierra Nevada Torpedo IPA, and several other craft beers. I drink based on what sounds good to me at the time. Hell, even a Miller Lite will still do the job in a pinch. Would I prefer a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale? Most of the time yes, but that's not always an option. I don't judge anyone because they drink BMC, I think they may be missing out on some things, but they can drink whatever the hell they want to. I am stealing this quote from someone on this forum, although I can't remember who it was, but I believe it was his grandfather that said "Beer is like sex, even the worst I ever had was still pretty damn good".

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Hey all! I am very new to home brewing and am young, I'm only 22 years old but being a recently honorably discharged Marine I spent the last four years in the Infantry drinking a beer pretty much every day I had free time stateside while I wasn't deployed, and it was always something local or SNPA. I grew up in a household where my dad drank Budweiser, Corona, MGD, and when he really wanted something nice, Dos Equis! Haha Being little he would let us have a sip to kill the curiosity and would rather have us sample his then somewhere at a party or who knows where else. Very early on I hated the taste and still do! The national brands just don't cut it flavor wise and since I didn't know of anything better I didn't drink. One day on Camp Pendleton, a fellow Marine introduced me to SNPA and I was hooked! I had never tasted beer so delicious, crisp, with the amazing aroma of that first Pale Ale. I just simply hadnt met a beer that had that much flavor or dedication put into it. I then went on a buying spree of every local brew I could find out in town or down in San Diego on tap at local brew restaurants.
I'm now back home in Utah and luckily have Squatters and Uinta Brewing Companies to keep me happy while I wait for my first batches to finish up. I joke around about drinking water (Budweiser) with my brother since he prefers it but I don't hate! Lol I will stick to my local brewery Pale Ales and IPAs while everyone else drinks as they please!

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GioGomez2010 wrote:

Hey all! I am very new to home brewing and am young, I'm only 22 years old but being a recently honorably discharged Marine I spent the last four years in the Infantry drinking a beer pretty much every day I had free time stateside while I wasn't deployed, and it was always something local or SNPA. I grew up in a household where my dad drank Budweiser, Corona, MGD, and when he really wanted something nice, Dos Equis! Haha Being little he would let us have a sip to kill the curiosity and would rather have us sample his then somewhere at a party or who knows where else. Very early on I hated the taste and still do! The national brands just don't cut it flavor wise and since I didn't know of anything better I didn't drink. One day on Camp Pendleton, a fellow Marine introduced me to SNPA and I was hooked! I had never tasted beer so delicious, crisp, with the amazing aroma of that first Pale Ale. I just simply hadnt met a beer that had that much flavor or dedication put into it. I then went on a buying spree of every local brew I could find out in town or down in San Diego on tap at local brew restaurants.
I'm now back home in Utah and luckily have Squatters and Uinta Brewing Companies to keep me happy while I wait for my first batches to finish up. I joke around about drinking water (Budweiser) with my brother since he prefers it but I don't hate! Lol I will stick to my local brewery Pale Ales and IPAs while everyone else drinks as they please!

So many GREAT craft brews outta SD!

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GioGomez2010 wrote:

Hey all! I am very new to home brewing and am young, I'm only 22 years old but being a recently honorably discharged Marine I spent the last four years in the Infantry drinking a beer pretty much every day I had free time stateside while I wasn't deployed, and it was always something local or SNPA. I grew up in a household where my dad drank Budweiser, Corona, MGD, and when he really wanted something nice, Dos Equis! Haha Being little he would let us have a sip to kill the curiosity and would rather have us sample his then somewhere at a party or who knows where else. Very early on I hated the taste and still do! The national brands just don't cut it flavor wise and since I didn't know of anything better I didn't drink. One day on Camp Pendleton, a fellow Marine introduced me to SNPA and I was hooked! I had never tasted beer so delicious, crisp, with the amazing aroma of that first Pale Ale. I just simply hadnt met a beer that had that much flavor or dedication put into it. I then went on a buying spree of every local brew I could find out in town or down in San Diego on tap at local brew restaurants.
I'm now back home in Utah and luckily have Squatters and Uinta Brewing Companies to keep me happy while I wait for my first batches to finish up. I joke around about drinking water (Budweiser) with my brother since he prefers it but I don't hate! Lol I will stick to my local brewery Pale Ales and IPAs while everyone else drinks as they please!


Where in Utah? If you're in or near SLC, check out the beer nut on state street (I think it's about 1200 S). They're very helpful and have good prices (especially on bulk LME).

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I agree that all beers have a place. In my opinion, there are very few light beers I will drink, and it's because they have no flavor. Bud is my palette cleanser after a few craft beers, or when working in the sun
I'm loving that there are so many craft beers out there. Do I like them all, heck no. But I really enjoy the fact that I have a much better selection than when I was 15. B)

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I've hear about them but have yet to stop by. Im located in Provo and am planning on stopping in next week haha Thanks for the info though I was wondering if they were helpful and a good place to go to.

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