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rmoore4556

Need assistance with a new recipe!

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Found this online and decided to give it a go:

All Grain Version

Beer Style: American Pale Ale
Batch Size: 5.5 gallons
Original Gravity: 1.051
Final Gravity: 1.011
Bitterness: 39 IBU
Boiling Time: 60 minutes
Color: 5 SRM
Alcohol: 5.24% ABV

Ingredients

8 lbs. 2-Row Pale Malt
2 lbs. Vienna Malt
0.5 lb. Crystal 10L Malt
1.0 oz. Cascade (6.6%) boil for 60 min.
0.5 oz. Cascade (6.6%) boil for 30 min.
0.25 oz. Cascade (6.6%) boil for 15 min.
0.25 oz. Cascade (6.6%) boil for 5 min.
Danstar Nottingham Ale Yeast.

Directions: Mash all grains for 60 minutes at 152 degrees. Drain the runnings into the boil kettle, recirculating the first quart or so back into the mash. Sparge with 175F degree water and boil for 60 minutes adding hops at the schedule above. Chill to 70 to 75 degrees before pitching yeast.

Fermentation
Use 1 Package of Nottingham Dry Yeast and ferment for 10 Days at 68 Degrees.

Extract Version: Steep Crystal Malt for 30 minutes at 155F. Replace Pale Malt and Vienna Malt with 6.5lb Extra Pale Liquid Malt Extract and 1.5lb Munich Liquid Malt Extract and boil according to directions above.

Now, I have never done all-grain, so when I went to my LHBS the guy gave me a somewhat modified version of the ingredients.

Here it is:
5 lbs Pilsen Light LME
1 lbs Munich LME
1 lbs 2-Row Pale Malt
2 lbs Vienna Malt
0.5 lbs Crystal 10L Malt
1.0 oz. Cascade (6.6%) boil for 60 min.
0.5 oz. Cascade (6.6%) boil for 30 min.
0.25 oz. Cascade (6.6%) boil for 15 min.
0.25 oz. Cascade (6.6%) boil for 5 min.
Plus, Safale 05 instead of nottingham (Which I prefer anyways)

My need for clarification comes in at the directions. LHBS guy told me to follow the all-grain directions and to just omit the "Drain the runnings into the boil kettle, recirculating the first quart or so back into the mash." I had a hard time remembering his directions so I want to make sure. I'll basically just be steeping grains for an hour, then adding LME and boiling for an hour (w/hops). How's this sound?

Thanks!

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texasbrewer0069 wrote:

You need to mash your grains not steep... very simple just follow the instructions as laid out by AG recipe...

What's the difference b/w mash and steep? Don't both entail throwing grains in a sack and into hot water for a period of time? In this instance 60 minutes @ 152*

EDIT: I understand the sugars vs. just flavor/appearance difference of mash vs steep (respectively). The actualy technical process is what I'm concerned with

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You're on the right track. Since you are doing a mash, use around 1.5-2 qts water per pound of grain just to ensure you have a good solution for enzyme activity. I'm a little confused as to why he has you using the Vienna malt in addition the Munich malt extract. It will be richer than the recipe intended, so you may want to bump up your hops a bit. If it was me, I'd use an ounce of hops for every addition, but I likes me hops.

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oly wrote:

... It will be richer than the recipe intended, so you may want to bump up your hops a bit. If it was me, I'd use an ounce of hops for every addition, but I likes me hops.

He mentioned that. Gave me Cascade that were 7.4% rather than 6.6%..? Still only 2 ounces though.

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Steeping is not as temp critical. .
Mashing is normally for a longer time span to get conversion ...
Hold grains as close to 152-154 for 1 hour...
Then mashout at 168 for 10 minutes...
You can either pour 168° water through grains or do the dunk method in a separate pot. .
You will be doing a Partial mash brew... this is a step closer to all grain..
If you are not already signed up for collaboration brew. .
Now would be a great time to do so...

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Thanks for the clarification on that! What's collaboration brew?

EDIT: The recipe also says 5.5 gallons...not 5. Does this still apply?

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That gives you 34 IBU's (Tinseth), which is really right in the target range for an APA. I don't think you're going to get a lot of hop flavor with only two quarter ounce additions at the end of your boil though. Some, but it will probably be subtle. Let us know how it turns out. B)

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rmoore4556 wrote:

EDIT: The recipe also says 5.5 gallons...not 5. Does this still apply?

I ran it on QBrew for 5.5 gallons.

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rmoore4556 wrote:

Thanks for the clarification on that! What's collaboration brew?

EDIT: The recipe also says 5.5 gallons...not 5. Does this still apply?


Collaboration brew is where you work with another brewer and make the same beer...
Oly was my collaboration partner and taught me alot...

5.5 gallon fermentation will net 5 gallons of brew ...
You will have more trub than in LBK...

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texasbrewer0069 wrote:

rmoore4556 wrote:

Thanks for the clarification on that! What's collaboration brew?


Collaboration brew is where you work with another brewer and make the same beer...
Oly was my collaboration partner and taught me alot...
And we even made a halfway decent beer. :chug:

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oly wrote:

texasbrewer0069 wrote:

rmoore4556 wrote:

Thanks for the clarification on that! What's collaboration brew?


Collaboration brew is where you work with another brewer and make the same beer...
Oly was my collaboration partner and taught me alot...
And we even made a halfway decent beer. :chug:

Halfway Hell ... to date its my Best so far and planning to redo it as my next brew!!!

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Just got done brewing. I'm worried about the wort. Its in an ice bath right now and (what I can only believe are hops) there is an accumulation of sediment towards the top, slightly submerged. Its so dense that it looks like seaweed. Or, more accurately, a sponge (The real kind, not the manufactured ones). This is my sixth batch (third 5 gal) and I've never seen it before. Have I just been overlooking it or is this odd? It occured right when the temp started to significantly drop.
Thanks

Also, first time using WhirFloc...last 15 min of boil

EDIT: Wort seems slightly less dense as well

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