Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
onefatgerman

What happens if you've areated your beer?

Recommended Posts

Instead of just tipping bottles to mix the sugar during the bottling process. I gave each bottle a good shake :ohmy:. Did I just mess my first batch up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

Welcome to the Borg!

Set them down, walk away, don't touch for 4 weeks.

Answer to your question, from: http://morebeer.com/content/homebrew-off-flavors

Oxidation
Tastes/Smells Like:
Stale or old, wet cardboard, sherry, papery, pineapple, decaying vegetables, Increased
bitterness, harshness
Possible Causes:
Oxidation occurs when oxygen negatively reacts with the molecules in the wort or beer.
An excessive level of oxygen being introduced to the beer, especially while wort is still
warm or after fermentation is complete, can create cardboard of sherry-like flavors.
Too much headspace in bottles can lead to oxidation as well. On the other hand,
aeration of wort before pitching yeast is necessary for yeast and good fermentation.
How to Avoid:
Oxidation is almost always a result of unnecessary splashing of fermented beer. When
transferring beer from one vessel to the next, prevent splashing by transferring beer
with tubing rather than pouring straight in. Keep the end of the transfer tubing
beneath the liquid line and avoid getting air pockets in the transfer tubing. Also, keep
exposure of wort to outside air at a minimum. Hot side aeration refers to wort becoming oxidized while it is hot. Warm liquid is
more inclined to absorb oxygen and therefore, it is recommended that when wort
is over 80ºF, splashing be avoided. During and directly after the boil splashing is not
much of a concern, as oxygen can’t really dissolve into liquid that hot. Cool wort as
quickly as possible and do not aerate wort until it is under 80ºF.
When bottling, only leave about ½” of headspace. The use of “oxygen absorbing”
bottle caps may help keep oxygen out of the bottle. When kegging, purge kegs with
Co2 to flush oxygen out of the headspace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

.lamron tuo emac ginhtyreve dna hctab tsirf ym ot gniht emas eht did I


:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Brew on. You're doin' fine.

Got a mirror? ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen this problem on the Forum many times. The old pros keep giving the same answer ...so I'll explain it to you.

You're totally screwed! Bottle them up and send them to me for disposal. ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the borg blomberg. I think I did the same thing on my first batch, it came out fine as yours will too. Don't really need to shake them, you can just turn them back and forth a few times, the yeast will find the sugar. Good Luck and Happy Brewing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the same thing as well. Came out fine. Welcome to the borg blomberg and brasscompass (hell of a first post brasscompass #218421 - I like!)

:charlie:

Tin Man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just bottled my first batch tonight. Instead of flipping the bottles over a few times i just held it on its side and kinda rolled the beer around to get all the sugar. Did it very slowly, mind you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just have to report back about this. I tried one at the 1 week mark and it was so good, I've already drank that entire batch. By drinking them so fresh I saw how the got even better day. My second batch I probably will wait for though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For future reference you dont need to do any swirling or shaking of the bottles. I simply add the sugar, cap the bottle then invert the bottle for a couple of seconds. That allows some of the sugar to suspend in the beer. The yeast is hungry and knows what to do from that point on. I have made nearly 30 batches that way and never had a problem yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boe1971 wrote:

For future reference you dont need to do any swirling or shaking of the bottles. I simply add the sugar, cap the bottle then invert the bottle for a couple of seconds. That allows some of the sugar to suspend in the beer. The yeast is hungry and knows what to do from that point on. I have made nearly 30 batches that way and never had a problem yet.

To this end, I prime, bottle and leave them be. No inverting, shaking, rolling, twirling or nothing. They all carb up fine as quick as they should. The yeast will find your sugar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SenorPepe wrote:

Boe1971 wrote:

For future reference you dont need to do any swirling or shaking of the bottles. I simply add the sugar, cap the bottle then invert the bottle for a couple of seconds. That allows some of the sugar to suspend in the beer. The yeast is hungry and knows what to do from that point on. I have made nearly 30 batches that way and never had a problem yet.

To this end, I prime, bottle and leave them be. No inverting, shaking, rolling, twirling or nothing. They all carb up fine as quick as they should. The yeast will find your sugar.


I never really thought about till the last time I bottled. Then I got got to wondering, "Do I really need to mix this up". Thanks for answering that question Pepe! I didn't even have to Google. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WolfMagus wrote:

SenorPepe wrote:

Boe1971 wrote:

For future reference you dont need to do any swirling or shaking of the bottles. I simply add the sugar, cap the bottle then invert the bottle for a couple of seconds. That allows some of the sugar to suspend in the beer. The yeast is hungry and knows what to do from that point on. I have made nearly 30 batches that way and never had a problem yet.

To this end, I prime, bottle and leave them be. No inverting, shaking, rolling, twirling or nothing. They all carb up fine as quick as they should. The yeast will find your sugar.


I never really thought about till the last time I bottled. Then I got got to wondering, "Do I really need to mix this up". Thanks for answering that question Pepe! I didn't even have to Google. :)

To clarify, I don't think it's harmful to very gently agitate the bottles (or invert, or whatever) if it makes you feel better. I just don't think it's necessary. Since I moved to batch priming it's a bit of a moot point for me, but I never really agitated when I bottle primed either. Just the gentle sloshing of the beer going in and the bottles being moved from one place to another seemed like plenty to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...