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jhyoung09

Yest?

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Ok, iknow this has probably been on here before, and if it has point me to it, cuz im not finding it. I want to try using some liquid yest, the problem is idk what to use, i know some r good for lagering, because of the lower temps, but idk which to get, how does the yeast affect the flavors of the beer? Still pretty much a noob.

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Welcome to MB and the Forum!

I don't know how the yeast affects the flavor, the science of it that is. But I do know that each strain has its own set of characteristics or profile. I would recommend that you only use a LHBS for liquid yeast because of potential for degradation from shipping temps.

Here are a couple of links for yeast profiles:

Lager Profiles

Ale Profiles

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The LHBS usually will have yeast info taped to the fridge or floating around somewhere in the shop.

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dferron wrote:

Welcome to MB and the Forum!

I don't know how the yeast affects the flavor, the science of it that is. But I do know that each strain has its own set of characteristics or profile. I would recommend that you only use a LHBS for liquid yeast because of potential for degradation from shipping temps.

Here are a couple of links for yeast profiles:

Lager Profiles

Ale Profiles

I've had good experiences with the liquid yeasts I've been ordering on-line, though I do request a cold pack with each during warmer periods.

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What type of beer are you trying to make? That will determine the yeast you want to use. You can talk to someone at your Local home Brew Shop (LHBS) and see what they recommend.

Also - why the need to use liquid yeast? Are you having a problem with dried yeasts? I have to admit - I have only used liquid yeast twice - and havent gotten to the point of sampling those in comparison to the other batches I have done with MrB yeast and then other dried yeasts. Maybe they will make that big a difference that I will be a total convert (and then start harvesting yeast at the end of batches).

If you don't have a local home brew shop handy - I imagine you could order online with necessary precautions 9requesting ice, having it sent to where someone can get it/sign for it) but that is something I would probably drive for if possible.

Definitely check the links above - MrMalty (Jamil) did a book on yeast with Chris White from White Labs I believe - can't really beat taht for knowledge. I am looking to discover as I taste later batches what effect the yeast may have had on my beers - so far, still only really up to batch 4 - soon I will hit the ones where I started branching out :) Batch 14 went into an LBK tonight - not bad considering I got my first LBK in October :)

Good Luck
Cheers
jeff

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It's more of a wanting to try new things, and see if it will make better beeer. And my house pretty much gets kept like between 66 and 69 degrees, and i know thats right on the cusp of the ideal fermenting temps, but do u think it really matters?

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jhyoung09 wrote:

It's more of a wanting to try new things, and see if it will make better beeer. And my house pretty much gets kept like between 66 and 69 degrees, and i know thats right on the cusp of the ideal fermenting temps, but do u think it really matters?


Does temperature matter? Absolutely. It's one of the most important things. Your temperatures are just about perfect.

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I mean i knew it mattered, lol. i meant is their temp ranges like the minimum and stuff or am i still good.

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jhyoung09 wrote:

I mean i knew it mattered, lol. i meant is their temp ranges like the minimum and stuff or am i still good.


The temperature range is just that--a range. The smaller number is the low end of the range (the coolest recommended temp) and the larger bummer is the top end of the range (the warmest recommended temp).

Generally speaking, being near the low end of the range will give a cleaner fermentation (less contribution to the flavor from the yeast). Brewing warmer will get more contribution from the yeast (esters and phenols). Some styles of beer benefit from these flavors, but in others, they're considered off flavors.

With some yeasts, if your temperatures drop below the lower end of the range, fermentation may pause, while in other cases, it may continue, but at a slower pace. Brewing too warm will likely lead to faster fermentation and potential off flavors.

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If you drink a lot of Belgian Wheats - there are certain yeasts that are specific/favored for those styles. I can't recommend any in particular as I haven't made those types yet but on wyeast or white labs or mr malty sites I am sure you can find the recommended yeasts for them - or any beer style you are going to make.

Most of my stuff so far has been in the Ale/ IPA vein, so I have bought a couple of liquid and a bunch of dried yeasts for those, and a German yeast as well if i recall correctly.

I am just now getting to the point where i am putting samples of my batches from when I expanded my yeasts to non MrB so hopefully I will have more evidence of how they can affect things soon. Guess I better get to drinking :)

Cheers
jeff

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