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SmokingTony

Why is it soooo much better after it warms up???

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Someone please tell me! Is it like the way a red wine needs to breathe? Is it like the way the spring sun comes to save us from winter? What is the science behind it, and why is it so awesome?

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Guest System Admin

I honestly don't know the answer to that, and I'd love to hear it from those who just might know. But I have to say, it is interesting that you say that, because I always heard that in Europe they drink their beers at room temp. I've always wondered about that but never pursued it. I really do want to hear more about this.

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Different beers are better at different temperatures. Not all beers taste better warmer.

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bpgreen wrote:

Different beers are better at different temperatures. Not all beers taste better warmer.

+1

For me, I prefer traditional Lagers, Pilsners and most IPA's colder... But not too cold such that the flavor ets 'frozen out'...

For many ales, particularly the maltier ones,I enjoy the flavors and aromas that release aa the beer warms to room temp...

:P

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Yeah, I like most lagers and pilsners very cold, but I was referring to ales and I was hoping to get some sort of Alton Brown type response as to why the aromas and flavors develop as the temperature rises and why this effect is not desirable with pilsners and other certain lagers.

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Bottom line is really cold beer numbs your taste buds. The more your taste buds wake up the more you can taste the flavor of the beer. I do know there are different recommended temperatures for different styles. But I don't think you are going to really pick up the full flavor from any of them much under 46 degrees F.

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Gymrat wrote:

Bottom line is really cold beer numbs your taste buds. The more your taste buds wake up the more you can taste the flavor of the beer. I do know there are different recommended temperatures for different styles. But I don't think you are going to really pick up the full flavor from any of them much under 46 degrees F.

+1

Why do you think they tell you to wait until the mountains turn blue? ;)

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good stuff, there is really so much some people dont know about beer.including me. thats why i read these forums.

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The Mountains turn blue because they know not to many people like to drink warm water...

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+1 on the taste buds. Many have been conditioned to think colder is better, more refreshing. Marketing has drilled it into our heads. There are recommended temps for each style beer, start with those temps, and experiment for what works for you. It's a matter of balance too. I personally don't like cask beers, as they are served around here anyway) at room temps. I do get a sample of them though when they offer a certain beer both as a cask and a colder kegged beer. Big difference. I do appreciate the flavors they have, just can't down a pint of "warmer" beer.
Another taste bud note... the nose contains more taste buds than your tongue. Don't snort your beer, but breath it in for added appreciation.

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craigger64 wrote:

Gymrat wrote:

Bottom line is really cold beer numbs your taste buds. The more your taste buds wake up the more you can taste the flavor of the beer. I do know there are different recommended temperatures for different styles. But I don't think you are going to really pick up the full flavor from any of them much under 46 degrees F.

+1

Why do you think they tell you to wait until the mountains turn blue? ;)


To lessen the lack of flavor (non) taste :woohoo:

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Another benefit of the cold is keeping the carbonation in check, allowing a better pour...I'm one who will pour into a cold glass, and then let it sit just a bit(Ales).
For me there seems to be point though where it gets a bit too warm, where I don't like it, but I'm usually through a 16 Oz glass in 3-4 drinks(early that is) :P

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My general rules of thumb:
- lagers served colder than ales
- the more carbonation, the lower the temperature
- higher the fg, warmer the temperature
- the more body in a beer, the warmer the temperature
- the higher the abv, the warmer the beer
- I do not use a frosted glass or mug

There are some exceptions to these rules, but in a general sense, that's what I go with.

BOM is right on. Tastebuds are inhibited by cold temperatures. BMC has drilled it into our head that colder is better simply because they have something to hide. They want your tastebuds numb... I'll let you conclude as to the reasons why. That being said, even with non-BMC, I'm inclined to serve a pale lager cold.

Here is a nice article on the subject, and their recommendations:

Very cold (0-4C/32-39F): Any beer you don’t actually want to taste. Pale Lager, Malt Liquor, Canadian-style Golden Ale and Cream Ale, Low Alcohol, Canadian, American or Scandinavian-style Cider.

Cold (4-7C/39-45F): Hefeweizen, Kristalweizen, Kölsch, Premium Lager, Pilsner, Classic German Pilsner, Fruit Beer, brewpub-style Golden Ale, European Strong Lager, Berliner Weisse, Belgian White, American Dark Lager, sweetened Fruit Lambics and Gueuzes, Duvel-types

Cool (8-12C/45-54F): American Pale Ale, Amber Ale, California Common, Dunkelweizen, Sweet Stout, Stout, Dry Stout, Porter, English-style Golden Ale, unsweetened Fruit Lambics and Gueuzes, Faro, Belgian Ale, Bohemian Pilsner, Dunkel, Dortmunder/Helles, Vienna, Schwarzbier, Smoked, Altbier, Tripel, Irish Ale, French or Spanish-style Cider

Cellar (12-14C/54-57F): Bitter, Premium Bitter, Brown Ale, India Pale Ale, English Pale Ale, English Strong Ale, Old Ale, Saison, Unblended Lambic, Flemish Sour Ale, Bière de Garde, Baltic Porter, Abbey Dubbel, Belgian Strong Ale, Weizen Bock, Bock, Foreign Stout, Zwickel/Keller/Landbier, Scottish Ale, Scotch Ale, American Strong Ale, Mild, English-style Cider

Warm (14-16C/57-61F): Barley Wine, Abt/Quadrupel, Imperial Stout, Imperial/Double IPA, Doppelbock, Eisbock, Mead

Hot (70C/158F): Quelque Chose, Liefmans Glühkriek, dark, spiced winter ales like Daleside Morocco Ale.

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mnstarzz13 wrote:

I think it has to do with the integrated cumulonimbus and the ever popular continuum transfunctioner.

what happens when you get it up to 88 mph?

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Elsteve-o wrote:

mnstarzz13 wrote:

I think it has to do with the integrated cumulonimbus and the ever popular continuum transfunctioner.

what happens when you get it up to 88 mph?


Haha the continuum transfunctioner is from dude wheres my car. Your thinking of the flux capacitor, lol. i love those movies...

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Brew-tality wrote:

Elsteve-o wrote:

mnstarzz13 wrote:

I think it has to do with the integrated cumulonimbus and the ever popular continuum transfunctioner.

what happens when you get it up to 88 mph?


Haha the continuum transfunctioner is from dude wheres my car. Your thinking of the flux capacitor, lol. i love those movies...

I havent seen either movie in 5 years

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Guest System Admin

I'm starting to have flash backs to MGD in the black cans....bad idea in the sun!

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mtsoxfan wrote:


Another taste bud note... the nose contains more taste buds than your tongue. Don't snort your beer, but breath it in for added appreciation.

This is why so often a beer on tap will taste "better" then the same beer drunk from a bottle. When you drink tap beer you're drinking it from a glass, so your nose is more involved, unlike when you drink it from a bottle. Your nose is VERY involved in the flavor of things.

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being originally from europe well Scotland i grew up with warm beer.

Now cold beer i do like but warm beer has a more fuller taste to the beer.
Good example if you can get it try a couple bottles of fraoch chilled and room temp huge difference.
But i guess the taste buds with cold and warm does make sense never would have thunk it.

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Brew-tality wrote:

Elsteve-o wrote:

mnstarzz13 wrote:

I think it has to do with the integrated cumulonimbus and the ever popular continuum transfunctioner.

what happens when you get it up to 88 mph?


Haha the continuum transfunctioner is from dude wheres my car. Your thinking of the flux capacitor, lol. i love those movies...

What happens when you do all that and then turn it up to 11?

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SmokingTony wrote:

Yeah, I like most lagers and pilsners very cold, but I was referring to ales and I was hoping to get some sort of Alton Brown type response as to why the aromas and flavors develop as the temperature rises and why this effect is not desirable with pilsners and other certain lagers.

I'm sort of making educated guesses here with my answers, but I don't think I'm too far wrong. Of course, if there's empirical evidence someone can find to prove me wrong, well, I'll learn something, and that's always good. But here's my hypothesis, so see if this makes sense.

We know brewing is a centuries-old craft. Mechanical refrigeration and temperature control, however, is a relatively new occurrance. Therefore, the brewers had to adapt to brewing under the natural conditions which prevailed in their particular region.

So where do darker ales, such as reds, browns, porters and stouts predominate? My answer is usually the British Isles. Sometimes the weather conditions can be pretty harsh in spots, but for the most part, we don't associate this region with really cold weather. They cellared their beer, as they cellared everything that benefitted from cooler storage temps, but their cellars wouldn't get much below 45 or 50 degrees, if that. Result? They developed beers that were best at that temperature.

Now, lagers were developed where? Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland. What do they have in Eastern Europe? Why, they have snow-covered mountains! Nature's refrigerator! So while they could certainly develop ales that worked well at warmer temperatures, they could also develop those lovely pilsners and other lagers that are pale, crisp, refreshing, and benefit from being served at lower temps.

Yes, a brown ale or a porter should be tasted at between 50 and 55 degrees, to let the layering of the malt flavors come to the fore. And you notice those beers aren't as heavily hopped. Many lagers have more hop characteristic than malt intrigue, because (I believe) warmth inhibits hop flavor and enhances malt flavor, but cold inhibits malt flavor and lets the hops come forward more.

In a nutshell, beers were developed that worked best at whatever natural temperature conditions prevailed for a certain region. Now, with mechanical temperature control, not only can someone living in Haiti brew a lager, but new and exciting types of beers, both ales and lagers, can be developed and perfected.

But I believe the answer to your original question is simply man wanting the best beer he could make, and adapting his brewing and storage to take advantage of the conditions in which he found himself.

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FedoraDave wrote:

Brew-tality wrote:

Elsteve-o wrote:

mnstarzz13 wrote:

I think it has to do with the integrated cumulonimbus and the ever popular continuum transfunctioner.

what happens when you get it up to 88 mph?


Haha the continuum transfunctioner is from dude wheres my car. Your thinking of the flux capacitor, lol. i love those movies...

What happens when you do all that and then turn it up to 11?

a midget will destroy stonehedge :lol:

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Elsteve-o wrote:

FedoraDave wrote:

Brew-tality wrote:

Elsteve-o wrote:

mnstarzz13 wrote:

I think it has to do with the integrated cumulonimbus and the ever popular continuum transfunctioner.

what happens when you get it up to 88 mph?


Haha the continuum transfunctioner is from dude wheres my car. Your thinking of the flux capacitor, lol. i love those movies...

What happens when you do all that and then turn it up to 11?

a midget will destroy stonehedge :lol:

and then a leprechaun will drink all your beer and almost tell you the full meaning of "42". But don't trust the little buggar. They lie a lot when they drink. :dry:

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