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jcubz

Yeast problem

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Ok so Im brewing my second batch and I think that I killed the yeast by accident. I live in a small town and dont want to waste this beer. can I add plain kitchen yeast? like quick yeast? if not why? and also any suggestions?

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"kitchen yeast" won't work. Explain more about what you may have done. Brewing yeast is pretty tough stuff.

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jcubz wrote:

Ok so Im brewing my second batch and I think that I killed the yeast by accident. I live in a small town and dont want to waste this beer. can I add plain kitchen yeast? like quick yeast? if not why? and also any suggestions?


1} Why you think you killed your yeast buddies? Too hot temp when you pitched? If it was on the cold side they will wake up and go to work.
2} I would not use a kitchen yeast. Just my opinion.

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If you haven't pitched the yeast yet, you can rehydrate it by boiling half cup of water, let it cool to 85-90 F. Sprinkle the yeast, wait 15 minutes, stir. Add a small amount of sugar. If it starts to bubble within 15-20 minutes, you're ok and can add it to the wort and it will ferment.

If it doesn't start to bubble, the yeast is dead.

In a pinch, bread yeast (not the quick rising/bread machine kind) can be used to ferment beer. It wouldn't be my first choice, but bread yeast is somewhat similar to an English ale yeast.

If it's not easy for you to get good yeast, I'd suggest stocking up on some yeast from an online brew store. If you order from Mr beer, just add some yeast to each order.

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Thanks for the advice. Sorry I was at work.

I think the temp was too high when I pitched the yeast. I'm going to try the bread yeast i think...

Thanks. When I go to the big city ill stock up big time.

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mtsoxfan wrote:

I'm not sure that bread yeast will work in the temperatures you want to ferment beer at.


Bread yeast is the same species as ale yeast. That's not to say that it's particularly well suited for it, but it will work.

I've used it before as an experiment. It wouldn't be my first choice, but if the choice is bread yeast or dump the batch, the bread yeast would be my choice.

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Pick up a couple more extract kits and use those yeasts as backup. Then replace the missing yeast with ones from LHBS or online later on.

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How do you know the yeast isn't doing it's thing while you are at work? When you get home - look THROUGH the LBK (don't open it if at all possible). Is anything happening at the top? If no, you may have missed it or it may not have started yet. Is there any trub forming on bottom? If so - at least some of them survived.

Is there anyplace you can get yeast nearby? If this yeast was completely scorched I don't know how much time you have to get more yeast on there - I would think as long as it isn't opened no bad guy yeast can get in there - so maybe throw it in the fridge (if there is not activity) until you can get some yeast?

Good luck
jeff

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Manowarfan1 wrote:

How do you know the yeast isn't doing it's thing while you are at work? When you get home - look THROUGH the LBK (don't open it if at all possible). Is anything happening at the top? If no, you may have missed it or it may not have started yet. Is there any trub forming on bottom? If so - at least some of them survived.


Good luck
jeff

I was gonna take this tack but as I read it he already pitched baker's yeast. I would have definitely waited longer, but hey, beer!

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It should be interesting to hear of the results. My initial thought was the baker's yeast likes temps in the 90's to do it's thing, so fermenting a beer at 60 could take some extended time. Bakers yeast normally produces more co2 then brewers yeast, but the temp factor may alter that. Let us know....

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