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Imperial Pilsner Mr. Beer Seasonal - Brewed!

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imperialpilsner.jpg

REFILL INCLUDES:
1 Can Imperial Pilsner HME
1 Packet Saflager W-34/70 Dry Lager Yeast
1 Packet No-Rinse Cleanser

ADDED:
0.5# CaraPils Grains - steep


My modified instructions:
1. Fill keg with cold water to the 4-quart mark on the back.
2. Place unopened can in hot tap water (warm liquid pours more easily).
3. Using a sanitized measuring cup, place 2 quarts of water into a clean 5-quart pot.
4. Bring water to 160*F, turn off heat and add grains (steep for 30min)
5. Remove grains and bring steep water to a boil and remove from heat. Stir HME into pot.
6. Pour wort into keg. Bring the volume of the keg to the 8.5-quart mark by adding more cold water. Stir vigorously to mix well.
7. Sprinkle yeast pack into keg (Temp between 66-70*F) and ALLOW TO SIT FOR 30 MINUTES. Stir vigorously again, then screw on lid.
8. Place keg out of direct sunlight, in a location with a consistent temperature (between 62°- 70°F) for 24 hours for lager yeast to activate.
9. After 24 hours place keg in cooling device and maintain 48-50*F temp for 16-21 days
10. Raise temp of devive to 62*F for 3 days for the D-rest.
11. After D-rest lower temp to 48-50*F for 7-10 days then bottle

Cold condition in bottle for 8-12 weeks

OG = 1.060 @ 68*F

Taste was good but darker than I expected, maybe due to being an Imperial Pilsner. As normal the seasonal had tons more hops in the can and was a pain to get cleaned out compared to the normal HME's (but that is why they are better).

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Looks like a good plan. CaraPils good idea, why did you go with 1/2 lb instead of say 1/4 lb? Just wondering. I think I will do that too atleast on one of the batches.

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Mine doesn't arrive until Monday and I don't think I can even brew it until next week. :( Might do it Mardi Gras day since I'm not going anywhere.
Never thought of adding to it and never used any seasonal before. I'm going to my LHBS tomorrow and I may even ask what he suggests to add to it. This sounds like a good idea.

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I'm excited, this is my Thursday brewing adventure along with something else. Nice add with the CaraPils!

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I haven't used any MB ingredients in a long time, but I bought a can of this since I can do proper lager fermentations now. Anyone think this would benefit from boiling some Saaz hops? Don't know if thatd be a good idea since they say they used Motueka, and Green Bullet in the HME. I've never tried either of those hop varieties.

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The sample I took tasted pretty hoppy for a Pils, so might be over kill adding more

--- edit ---
I guess I should of done only 1/4# but 1/2# is about max for a Mr. beer size batch so not too much over-kill

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Great, cool seeing someone already brewing this.

Always wanted to know why a sanitized measuring cup, place 2 quarts of water into a clean 5-quart pot.

Why would we need a sanitized cup when the water being used is boiled, never understood that.

Anyways, excited to get my kit this week but might be another week before I get to it. Can't wait to see how yours tastes in the end!

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I should be receiving mine on Tuesday. Should I follow the instructions to a tee? Should I do a D-rest? Do I need to transfer to a secondary for this one? Should I lager at colder temps than listed?

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Well 12 hours in and the LBK has a Krausen that is almost 1" high, I am tempted to put in cooler now. But I will wait until morning.

Took off pretty fast for lager yeast temp is at 65*F in my basement (LBK brew-o-meter temp)

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Trollby wrote:

Well 12 hours in and the LBK has a Krausen that is almost 1" high, I am tempted to put in cooler now. But I will wait until morning.

Took off pretty fast for lager yeast temp is at 65*F in my basement (LBK brew-o-meter temp)

Cool beans Trollby... I get mine tomorrow...

I'm gonna try one with the SafLager W-34/70, one with Wyeast Liquid Pilsner Urquell yeast and one with Wyeast 2007 ( the infamous St. Louis strain). ;)

Should be interesting...

:)

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BigPapaG wrote:

Trollby wrote:

Well 12 hours in and the LBK has a Krausen that is almost 1" high, I am tempted to put in cooler now. But I will wait until morning.

Took off pretty fast for lager yeast temp is at 65*F in my basement (LBK brew-o-meter temp)

Cool beans Trollby... I get mine tomorrow...

I'm gonna try one with the SafLager W-34/70, one with Wyeast Liquid Pilsner Urquell yeast and one with Wyeast 2007 ( the infamous St. Louis strain). ;)

Should be interesting...

:)


Are you gonna use the whole smack pack? I was thinking of doing the same.

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losman26 wrote:


Are you gonna use the whole smack pack? I was thinking of doing the same.

According to Mr.Malty, you would actually need almost 2 smack-packs per LBK. With lager yeast, it is recommended to pitch double the number of cells vs. ale yeast. Having said that, you will probably be ok with one smack-pack. Dry yeast has twice the cells of a smack-pack, so one pack of 34/70 will give you optimal pitching rates.

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russki wrote:

losman26 wrote:


Are you gonna use the whole smack pack? I was thinking of doing the same.

According to Mr.Malty, you would actually need almost 2 smack-packs per LBK. With lager yeast, it is recommended to pitch double the number of cells vs. ale yeast. Having said that, you will probably be ok with one smack-pack. Dry yeast has twice the cells of a smack-pack, so one pack of 34/70 will give you optimal pitching rates.


I think I will try one batch with a smack pack doing a starter with a stir plate.

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russki wrote:

losman26 wrote:


Are you gonna use the whole smack pack? I was thinking of doing the same.

According to Mr.Malty, you would actually need almost 2 smack-packs per LBK. With lager yeast, it is recommended to pitch double the number of cells vs. ale yeast. Having said that, you will probably be ok with one smack-pack. Dry yeast has twice the cells of a smack-pack, so one pack of 34/70 will give you optimal pitching rates.

I believe that W-34/70 pack (11.5g) is designed for 5 gallons lager. So a Smack pack of Lager yeast is fine for 2.5 Gallons per pack. Only need two Smack packs for doing 5 gallon batches (What my LHBS said)

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Trollby wrote:

russki wrote:

losman26 wrote:


Are you gonna use the whole smack pack? I was thinking of doing the same.

According to Mr.Malty, you would actually need almost 2 smack-packs per LBK. With lager yeast, it is recommended to pitch double the number of cells vs. ale yeast. Having said that, you will probably be ok with one smack-pack. Dry yeast has twice the cells of a smack-pack, so one pack of 34/70 will give you optimal pitching rates.

I believe that W-34/70 pack (11.5g) is designed for 5 gallons lager. So a Smack pack of Lager yeast is fine for 2.5 Gallons per pack. Only need two Smack packs for doing 5 gallon batches (What my LHBS said)

The reality is that most homebrewers underpitch, especially with lagers. That is not to say your beer won't turn out just fine with half the optimal amount, it's just that the yeast will have a longer lag time while they are building the proper population. Since you need double the cells for a healthy lager fermentation vs. ale of same gravity, that means 2 Salflager packs for 5 gallons, or 4 smack packs. I would personally believe Jamil vs. LHBS...

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russki wrote:


The reality is that most homebrewers underpitch, especially with lagers. That is not to say your beer won't turn out just fine with half the optimal amount, it's just that the yeast will have a longer lag time while they are building the proper population. Since you need double the cells for a healthy lager fermentation vs. ale of same gravity, that means 2 Salflager packs for 5 gallons, or 4 smack packs. I would personally believe Jamil vs. LHBS...

Wyeast recommends 2 packs for 5 gallons or 1 pack if you make a starter

So I would think the yeast maker recommendation is also worth following.

http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_lagerbrewing.cfm

--- edit ---
For 5 gallon batch:
Gravity = 1.061-1.076 (15-19P°)

Pitch temp = >65

Fermentation temp =
Amount of Yeast per 5 gallon = 12.00 million (1 smack = 6 mil)

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Trollby wrote:

russki wrote:


The reality is that most homebrewers underpitch, especially with lagers. That is not to say your beer won't turn out just fine with half the optimal amount, it's just that the yeast will have a longer lag time while they are building the proper population. Since you need double the cells for a healthy lager fermentation vs. ale of same gravity, that means 2 Salflager packs for 5 gallons, or 4 smack packs. I would personally believe Jamil vs. LHBS...

Wyeast recommends 2 packs for 5 gallons or 1 pack if you make a starter

So I would think the yeast maker recommendation is also worth following.

http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_lagerbrewing.cfm

--- edit ---
For 5 gallon batch:
Gravity = 1.061-1.076 (15-19P°)

Pitch temp = >65

Fermentation temp =
Amount of Yeast per 5 gallon = 12.00 million (1 smack = 6 mil)

Trollby, I'm not trying to knock your methods - 1 smack-pack per LBK will definitely accomplish the mission. All I'm saying is what Jamil Zainasheff says about proper pitching rates.

There are multiple ways to accomplish the same result - and if your process works, there's no reason to change it.

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Hey there, first time poster,long time reader. I just recently started brewing and unfortunately have been bitten by the "Brewbug" and I am now totally addicted. Guess it could be worse. I am having trouble figuring out how I want to approach my first lager, I will be receiving the new spring seasonal tomorrow. I wont be able to brew till next week. I'm thinking the garage is the way to go. Has anyone brewed in their garage with good results? The temps outside in Amarillo this time of year are in the 50's and lows are in the high 30s. I guess I could just go test the garage temp every couple of hours.

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You want to try and keep the temps steady, swings will give off flavors and could cause the yeast to get stuck fermenting.

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Trollby, thanks for all the good info. I plan on doing this next week and should have the Johnson temp controller by then to set my fridge for lager temps.
Your original post sounds like you've already tasted this. Was that at brew time or have you already had this refill long enough to have tried it?

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Well I do have a fridge in the garage,and I dont mind buying a johnson temperature controller,problem is I keep my bottled beer in this fridge also 50F is a little warm for my taste. Do you think this yeast would still work at 45F. Also is too warm for cold conditioning?

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So how much sugar would one prime their bottles with for this? I used the Screwy Brewer calculater and I'm getting 1.49 tsp for a liter bottle. Is this sounding about right?

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Well the temp your going to condition makes a differenace too.
But at 62*F using corn sugar = 1.49 tsp per ltr for 2.5 CO2

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losman26 wrote:

BigPapaG wrote:

Trollby wrote:

Well 12 hours in and the LBK has a Krausen that is almost 1" high, I am tempted to put in cooler now. But I will wait until morning.

Took off pretty fast for lager yeast temp is at 65*F in my basement (LBK brew-o-meter temp)

Cool beans Trollby... I get mine tomorrow...

I'm gonna try one with the SafLager W-34/70, one with Wyeast Liquid Pilsner Urquell yeast and one with Wyeast 2007 ( the infamous St. Louis strain). ;)

Should be interesting...

:)


Are you gonna use the whole smack pack? I was thinking of doing the same.

I will probably use two smack packs per LBK.

They each contain approximately 100 Billion cells each according to Wyeast...

I normally use two for a five gallon of ale, and one for an LBK.

Lagers require almost twice as many cells as ales due to the lower fermentation temperature and longer fermentation time.

I figure a wort gravity of about 1.060 as a baseline, and 52*F which will be my fermentation temp, and if you use the Screwy Brewer calculator set for Lagers, it indicates 177 Billion cells for 2.13 gallons... And that is consistant with what I've read previously about Lagers...

So I bought two each of the liquid strains...

For the dry yeast, I'm hoping but not sure that one 11.5g packet of the SafLager W-34/70 will be adequate... (by adequate, I mean my adequate, npt necessarily yours :) ) So I may pick another up and add about half the second packet for a total of one and a half packets of the dry yeast...

EDIT: Found this tidbit of info that seems to have some merit so I think I will just use one 11.5g packet of the dry yeast W-34/70 and see how it turns out... According to this review, they recommend two packets for 5 gallons so one should suffice for an LBK sized batch.

http://www.brewersfriend.com/2009/12/06/yest-review-saflager-w-3470-dry/

For the record, I use one and a half US-05's for five gallons of IPA when I'm expecting around 7% ABV... Seems like a lot, but it is still not near the 'danger zone for overpitching'...

Note that you could certainly use less and many do... But when I absolutely don't want to stress the yeast I tend to lean toward pitching more rather than less.

:)

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BigPapaG wrote:


For the dry yeast, I'm hoping but not sure that one 11.5g packet of the SafLager W-34/70 will be adequate... (by adequate, I mean my adequate, npt necessarily yours :) ) So I may pick another up and add about half the second packet for a total of one and a half packets of the dry yeast...

EDIT: Found this tidbit of info that seems to have some merit so I think I will just use one 11.5g packet of the dry yeast W-34/70 and see how it turns out... According to this review, they recommend two packets for 5 gallons so one should suffice for an LBK sized batch.

http://www.brewersfriend.com/2009/12/06/yest-review-saflager-w-3470-dry/


One pack of 34/70 is absolutely perfect for an LBK-sized batch. I pitched a pack into my Pilsner, and had active fermentation within 8 hours @60F, I had to dial the temps down sooner than I thought.

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My plan is just about spot-on with Trollby's with the following differences:
1)1/4 lb Carapils
2) After bottling I'll leave at room temp for 2 weeks before cold conditioning

With any luck, I'm whipping this up this coming weekend.

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Kealia wrote:

My plan is just about spot-on with Trollby's with the following differences:
1)1/4 lb Carapils
2) After bottling I'll leave at room temp for 2 weeks before cold conditioning

With any luck, I'm whipping this up this coming weekend.


I think I'm going to carbon copy you down to brewing it this weekend. I'm hoping to have my thermo control for the mini fridge by this weekend but if not, I'll start with the ice chest to keep it in the low to mid 50's.
Actually, at it's highest setting, this fridge seems to keep a temp of 56. Just don't hear it kick on that much so I'm not sure how high and low the temp changes go.

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Beer-lord wrote:

Kealia wrote:

My plan is just about spot-on with Trollby's with the following differences:
1)1/4 lb Carapils
2) After bottling I'll leave at room temp for 2 weeks before cold conditioning

With any luck, I'm whipping this up this coming weekend.


I think I'm going to carbon copy you down to brewing it this weekend. I'm hoping to have my thermo control for the mini fridge by this weekend but if not, I'll start with the ice chest to keep it in the low to mid 50's.
Actually, at it's highest setting, this fridge seems to keep a temp of 56. Just don't hear it kick on that much so I'm not sure how high and low the temp changes go.

I am going to copy this as well this weekend. The only difference is I am going to steep 1/4 lb Carafoam as my LHBS doesn't carry Carapils. I need to do it this weekend and ferment in the basement as temp. in the basement is perfect this time of year.

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WOW!

This morning when I was switching bottles in the cooler "SULFUR" smell very strong

Yesterday was very malty smell, today open cooler and LBK @ 48*F strong sulfur, first time that strong, wounder if it is the recipe.

All the past lagers was mild but still had some malt smell to it, this one is more dominate.

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Looks like I may be fermenting a bit cooler. My mini fridge without the Johnson Controller holds at about 45 at the highest setting. If I figure 3-5 degrees higher for the temp inside the keg due to fermentation I should be spot on the lower range of the yeast (although I've read elsewhere where people have used it down to 40 with good results).

I plan on taking my time with this one so extra time to ferment won't matter at all.

I'll be prepared for a heavy sulfur smell :X

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Same here, mine's been at 45 since I got the controller though I think I ordered the wrong one. This one works fine and was cheaper....got this one
http://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Controls-A19AAT-2C-Temperature-Controller/dp/B0002EAL58/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1329367830&sr=8-2
But, this one has a touchpad and looks like it's better and more expensive.
http://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Controls-Digital-Thermostat-Control/dp/B00368D6JA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1329367830&sr=8-1
Mine is doing what it's supposed to be so far.

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Trollby wrote:

WOW!

This morning when I was switching bottles in the cooler "SULFUR" smell very strong

Yesterday was very malty smell, today open cooler and LBK @ 48*F strong sulfur, first time that strong, wounder if it is the recipe.

All the past lagers was mild but still had some malt smell to it, this one is more dominate.


When does sulfur smell come about?

:blink:

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This is going into the fermenter today and then right into the garage. After the two weeks I plan on doing the Carapils route as I have ordered another can of the pilsner....that will go three weeks I think.

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ZiggyZag wrote:

Trollby wrote:

WOW!

This morning when I was switching bottles in the cooler "SULFUR" smell very strong

Yesterday was very malty smell, today open cooler and LBK @ 48*F strong sulfur, first time that strong, wounder if it is the recipe.

All the past lagers was mild but still had some malt smell to it, this one is more dominate.


When does sulfur smell come about?

:blink:

For my Lagers I notice it normally about 3-5 days into the fermentation but never this strong of a smell

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Looking back at the OP, I see that there are actually two more variances that I'll have:
- Rehydrating the yeast first
- Pitching closer to actual fermentation temps

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I brewed mine up today with an OG 1.061. What's the ideal temp for fermenting, 50 F? Or should I go lower? I plan on leaving it at room temp 68F until I see visible signs of fermentation, then move it to my wine fridge. Is it better to leave at room temp for the beginning?

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losman26 wrote:

I brewed mine up today with an OG 1.061. What's the ideal temp for fermenting, 50 F? Or should I go lower? I plan on leaving it at room temp 68F until I see visible signs of fermentation, then move it to my wine fridge. Is it better to leave at room temp for the beginning?

the maker says 12C = 53.6*F I like mine slightly lower (48-50*F)

Reading the brew forums many state if jumps starts the Lager yeast better to go 24 hours at warmer temps. I did not do this on several other lagers but done it the last two, it does seem to get it going better. Have not tried the 1st one since still conditioning.

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Trollby wrote:

losman26 wrote:

I brewed mine up today with an OG 1.061. What's the ideal temp for fermenting, 50 F? Or should I go lower? I plan on leaving it at room temp 68F until I see visible signs of fermentation, then move it to my wine fridge. Is it better to leave at room temp for the beginning?

the maker says 12C = 53.6*F I like mine slightly lower (48-50*F)

Reading the brew forums many state if jumps starts the Lager yeast better to go 24 hours at warmer temps. I did not do this on several other lagers but done it the last two, it does seem to get it going better. Have not tried the 1st one since still conditioning.


Do you mean 24 hours after pitching the yeast, or 24 hours after visible signs of fermentation?

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Max of 24 hours AFTER pitch yeast.

I have read that when you get good sign fermentation is under way cool to lager temp, but do not wait longer than 24 hours.

Technically 12 hours after I pitched I had very active signs of fermentation, I put my LBK in the cooler when I got up next morning about 18-20 hours after I pitched the yeast.

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Trollby wrote:

Max of 24 hours AFTER pitch yeast.

I have read that when you get good sign fermentation is under way cool to lager temp, but do not wait longer than 24 hours.

Technically 12 hours after I pitched I had very active signs of fermentation, I put my LBK in the cooler when I got up next morning about 18-20 hours after I pitched the yeast.


I take it you're gonna do a D-rest? At what point with this yeast would you do it? I hear some people say when it's at 70% of your projected FG, others say when you hit FG. I'm not all that familiar with this yeast.

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I just do mine about 16 days and do 3 days at 62*F figure it is ether done or pretty close by that point

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More information to help you make a decision (if it's not too late):

Pitching warmer than fermenting temps will indeed help jump start your fermentation by reducing lag time, but it also raises the probability of a the production of things like diacytel and other undesired compounds/flavors.

Granted, if you have a good d-rest you can counteract this, but pitching within the fermentation temp reduces the chances of diacytel in the first place, making the d-rest less necessary.

I don't like to push things, so I pitch within the fermentation temp and then will still do a d-rest. Knowing that lager yeast works slower, I'll wait two weeks to pull a gravity sample, and then raise the temp at that point.

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Is anyone going to transfer this to a secondary? Or is it better to leave it as is, after the D-rest?

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I don't plan on doing a secondary. I'll pretty much follow Trollby's run. Plan on doing this in the next 3 days or so. Just making sure my fridge and controller will keep a good, steady temp of 48 degrees.

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So is the so called "lagering phase" done after bottling with this batch, or will you bring the temp to the LBK down after the d-rest?

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For now, my plans are to allow fermentation to start at about 60-66 degrees and let it sit for 24 hours to ensure a good start. Then I'll move it to the mini fridge for as close to 48 degrees as I can keep it....probably for about 2 1/2 weeks then a temp rise to 62-62 for 2 days (maybe a bit more) then back to 48 degree for another week. Then to bottle where I'll try to keep them at 50 for 2 weeks.
This is the part where I'm most unsure. How long and what temps do I keep the bottled beer. After 2 weeks, I was thinking of dropping down to 42 for 1 more week, then trying one to possibly decide how I should continue.
I've used lager yeasts before (years ago) but never got below 60 nor waited longer than 4 weeks so this new to me. However, I'll already have a good supply of beer so my patience won't get tried. With any luck, I'll have some to drink in time for the spring grass cutting and yard work I'll be doing.

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After the D-rest I plan on 2 weeks in the fridge at around 38 before bottling (in the primary).

Then, carbing at room temp.
Then back into the fridge for at least a month before testing.

Not saying it's right or wrong - just my plan.

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Kealia wrote:

After the D-rest I plan on 2 weeks in the fridge at around 38 before bottling (in the primary).

Then, carbing at room temp.
Then back into the fridge for at least a month before testing.

Not saying it's right or wrong - just my plan.

Interesting...so 2 weeks at 48 - then 2 days of D-Rest then 2 weeks in the fridge at 38 degrees. Then bottling and carbing for 2 weeks at room temp. Then back in the fridge for 30 days. Do I have it right from all the messages? Have you done this before with other lagers? This is my first so I am trying to make it right.

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I brewed my imperial pilsner last night and put it in my mini fridge (49*) right away. Now im reading this thread and it looks like i should have waited to cool it until i saw definate signs of fermentation. should i pull it out and let it warm up or is it to late? It will still work right ill just have a long lag time?

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kdubbleu wrote:

I brewed my imperial pilsner last night and put it in my mini fridge (49*) right away. Now im reading this thread and it looks like i should have waited to cool it until i saw definate signs of fermentation. should i pull it out and let it warm up or is it to late? It will still work right ill just have a long lag time?

I have done 4 lagers that way and all turned out great, I have started trying things I have read about to make lager from different places and the wait to chill is one way, chilling right away is another both are fine. Only thing is that it may start off slower and take longer to reach FG.

But true lagering is months not weeks, 90% here do like me and only run their lagers 3-4 weeks before bottling. We condition in the bottles not in a secondary

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Scottbrew wrote:


Interesting...so 2 weeks at 48 - then 2 days of D-Rest then 2 weeks in the fridge at 38 degrees. Then bottling and carbing for 2 weeks at room temp. Then back in the fridge for 30 days. Do I have it right from all the messages? Have you done this before with other lagers? This is my first so I am trying to make it right.

Yes I have and it works for me - but everybody has their own method, really. There is no absolute. As long as you control your fermenting temps and do a D-rest just to be safe, the rest is variable. I know it's your first lager but don't worry too much. You'll be hard pressed to do anything wrong.

kdubbleu wrote:

I brewed my imperial pilsner last night and put it in my mini fridge (49*) right away. Now im reading this thread and it looks like i should have waited to cool it until i saw definate signs of fermentation. should i pull it out and let it warm up or is it to late? It will still work right ill just have a long lag time?

Just leave it. With enough yeast, it's OK to pitch cold (or at fermenting temps). If Jamil and Palmer are OK with it, I am too.
By the time it warmed up it would probably be taking off anyway. What yeast really don't like is a lot of temp swings so just let it ride and you'll be fine.

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Ok cool as long as i get beer ill be happy. This is my first attempt at a lager, but i knew going into this it was going to be a long process so i am prepared to wait.

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Kealia wrote:

Scottbrew wrote:


Interesting...so 2 weeks at 48 - then 2 days of D-Rest then 2 weeks in the fridge at 38 degrees. Then bottling and carbing for 2 weeks at room temp. Then back in the fridge for 30 days. Do I have it right from all the messages? Have you done this before with other lagers? This is my first so I am trying to make it right.

Yes I have and it works for me - but everybody has their own method, really. There is no absolute. As long as you control your fermenting temps and do a D-rest just to be safe, the rest is variable. I know it's your first lager but don't worry too much. You'll be hard pressed to do anything wrong.

kdubbleu wrote:

I brewed my imperial pilsner last night and put it in my mini fridge (49*) right away. Now im reading this thread and it looks like i should have waited to cool it until i saw definate signs of fermentation. should i pull it out and let it warm up or is it to late? It will still work right ill just have a long lag time?

Just leave it. With enough yeast, it's OK to pitch cold (or at fermenting temps). If Jamil and Palmer are OK with it, I am too.
By the time it warmed up it would probably be taking off anyway. What yeast really don't like is a lot of temp swings so just let it ride and you'll be fine.

Cool beans!!! I am brewing tomorrow using your timeline. I am sure it will turn out fine.

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Cold conditioning is anything below "room-temp" or below 60*F

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02/18/2012
The Sulfer smell is down and can smell the malt again, was 2 days of very strong.

Glad it is mellowed out.

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So mine is in the garage and churning away nicely after being placed there Thursday. I think I may have to cold crash cause there's a lot of good stuff going on. Can someone run me through the process for this as I have never coldcrashed before.

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Since i put my LBK in the fridge right away how long should it take for me to see active fermentation?

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kdubbleu wrote:

Since i put my LBK in the fridge right away how long should it take for me to see active fermentation?


I placed mine on my cold room right after I pitched the yeast & left for work, when I checked on it 15 hrs later it had a good inch of krausen in it.

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kdubbleu wrote:

Since i put my LBK in the fridge right away how long should it take for me to see active fermentation?

What temp was the wort when you pitched yeast?

The past I pitched 66-70*F and went right to cooler, acouple took off in 24 hours athers took 2 days before I noticed activity

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Just started 2 runs of Imperial Pils today. Steeped the grain and put everything together while the rain poured down. Took OG readings and even though I thought that I had done the same for both batchs I got 2 different OGs, 1 was 1.064 at 70 and the other was 1.062 at 68. I threw 1/2 oz of Norther Brewer in one keg and 1 oz of cascade in the other keg. They are sitting in the cooler at 68 until tomorrow, then I will drop the controller to 54 for the next 2 or 3 weeks before the d-rest and then I will proceed from there depending on the appearance, smell and taste.

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OK VERY COOL. Im thrity hours in and just opened the mini fridge and was hit by the smell of sulfar. I put a flashlight up to the LBK and saw at least an inch of krausen. looks better then any of the other brews i have made. I guess now its time to sit and wait. I am very excited to see this. looks and smells like all is going well.

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Slight change of plans for me.
I've been reading through my past notes on batches and realized that 90% of the time that I use dry yeast, I end up with either an under-attenuated beer or a stuck fermentation (way under...).

That being the case I swung by my LHBS this morning and picked up a vial of WLP800. Made the starter a while ago and will pitch it in the next hour.

Tomorrow, assuming all looks good, I'll whip this batch up and dump in the starter - then go directly into the fridge.

The plus to this is that I can then wash the yeast and have some lager yeast on hand for a future brew. I find myself with some LME left over from a recent 5G batch so I might do a Franken-Lager soon.

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WHEW!! I brewed the Imperial Pilsner this morning, pitched yeast @ about 8:45am (AZ time) It is 6:46pm (AZ time) AND it is bubbling away like crazy already!!! I had it in my ale fermentation fridge @ 62*-64* and just moved it to the mini fridge @ 49*. I steeped 1/2lb carapils & used a couple packs of Mr B yeast in the boil as a yeast nutrient.

I also brewed up a double batch of modified Fire In The Hole. I used 8 packs of Mr B yeast in that batch and it too is going crazy already! :woohoo:

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Just got my Pilsner brewed. Used 1/4 lb of carapils. I thought about adding some saaz hops but decided to just leave this alone and follow instructions.
SG was 1.061 and it tasted pretty good. I did notice a number of chunks in the malt that I've not seen before but I assume it was hops and it appeared to have dissolved.
Gonna leave this alone for 24 hours then put in my fridge at 48-50 for 2 weeks.

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everybody states fermenting at 48 degrees, Im currently at 54 degrees and planned on staying there. Will this be okay? I will D-rest in two plus weeks and then thought I might go to a slimline in the fridge for a week before carbing. I plan fitting my slimline with an airlock if possible. My reasoning for the secondary is to get the LBK back in action sooner. another Imperial maybe with some steeped grains ( any suggestion on grain type)

thnx
Troy

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meenacta wrote:

everybody states fermenting at 48 degrees, Im currently at 54 degrees and planned on staying there. Will this be okay? I will D-rest in two plus weeks and then thought I might go to a slimline in the fridge for a week before carbing. I plan fitting my slimline with an airlock if possible. My reasoning for the secondary is to get the LBK back in action sooner. another Imperial maybe with some steeped grains ( any suggestion on grain type)

thnx
Troy

W-34/70 range is 48-59*F with perfect temp (per makers) is 53.6*F so your fine.

I picked carapils since only adds body no flavor

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Brewed the first batch tonight. Was going to do straight up, but had a little extra time and steeped 1/4 lb CaraPils. Looks like alot of hops, smelled good, (they all do), didn't taste or hyd. sample. In the keg in the cooler with ice bottles.

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Like everybody else, mine is chugging away at about 52 degrees.
Nice creamy krasuen which I didn't expect to get. No sulfur smell yet...not that I'm complaining.

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All is looking good. I stopped screwing with the temp controller (since the JC is on my keg fridge) and left it alone and I've settled in at 47/48 for the past 5 days or so. On the low end of the yeast's range but I'm not concerned at all.

I'll still plan on a d-rest at the end to help finish things off. No sulfur smell at all. I wonder if that only comes from pitching warm (I didn't).

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Kealia wrote:

All is looking good. I stopped screwing with the temp controller (since the JC is on my keg fridge) and left it alone and I've settled in at 47/48 for the past 5 days or so. On the low end of the yeast's range but I'm not concerned at all.

I'll still plan on a d-rest at the end to help finish things off. No sulfur smell at all. I wonder if that only comes from pitching warm (I didn't).

Are you putting the LBK in the fridge after the d-rest or are you going directly to bottling? By the way, mine had no sulfur smell either and I an currently around 55 give or take. Hard to tell because its sitting on the basement floor.

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I plan on going back to the fridge at 38 - 42 for 2 weeks after the D-rest. Then I'll bottle and carb for 2-3 weeks at room temp before tossing them back into the fridge for a while.

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Started my D-rest today.

I guess I been keeping it colder in the cooler than I thought, the brew-o-meter form my LHBS read 45*F for the keg this morning


--- edit ---
I just got back into town from a Homicide trial in northern WI, my wife has been changing the bottles for me.

Must be since both kegs are close to done fermenting the heat from the LBK is nominal and wife does not check like I do, just swap bottles

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What temperature and how long do you plan to D-rest it?
I'm still up in the air about how long but I have at least another week before D-rest. I was thinking 3 days as it will likely take a full day to go from 48 to 60 in the LBK.

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My basement is running 64*F right now were I have the LBK, I am planning on putting it back in the cooler Saturday.

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03/03/12
D-rest complete the LBK Brew-o-meter read 64*F, back in the cooler to chill back to 48*F for the next week.

Bottle next weekend

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Checked mine today to see how it was going. Two weeks in and I'm at 1.024 (from OG of 1.062). Not worried at all, things seem to be moving just fine.

I forgot for a while that I used WLP800 instead of the dry yeast that came with it and I was at the very bottom of it's stated temp range at 50 for the first week, but I did ramp up to about 53/54 this past week.

I have the sample/satellite fermenter next to the primary now and I'l; check it again in another week or so. Most of the reviews on this strain say 3 weeks in primary anyway so I'm moving right along.

I don't plan on drinking this until May anyway so I have nothing but time to let it do it's thing.

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Put mine on d-rest yesterday after 2 weeks in the basement. Gravity checks in at 1.018 and it smells great. Plan on going 3 days at 64 and then in the fridge for 2 weeks and then in the bottle. Moving right along.

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My 2 batches have been working for 16 days now at 55 degrees. Took a FG reading and got 1.019(OG 1.064) on one and 1.018(OG 1.062) on the other so I guess we are on schedule. I plan to start d-rest Sunday and run it at 68 thru Wednesday, back to 55 for 10 days then into the bottles for at least 2 months or so.

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D-resting started Saturday afternoon removed from the cooler to about a 62 degree basement. Last night finally noticed some small gobules of trub floating about, may have taken two days for LBK to warm up to ambient temp. Question how long should I continue this Drest ? until activity subsides or is there a maximum time before returning the LBK to the low 50"s

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D-rest is normally 2-4 days then back to 48-59*F

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I have already reached FG after 3 weeks @ 50-53 deg. I pitched @ 66 deg. and lowered temps to fermentation temps within 24 hours in hopes not to have to do a D-rest. This is my first lager. I read on Fermentis' web page that you shouldn't have to do a D-rest if you get to ferm temps quickly? I would like to carb/bottle and leave at ferm temps. FG is already at 1.013 at 51 deg.... What do y'all think? :dry:

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I'm a week or so into brewing this, am i missing something with this
D-rest you speak of what is it?? When should I do it?

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If you plan on room temp bottle conditioning you donot have to do a D-rest since the first week to two weeks is same as d-rest.

D-rest should be done near the end of fermentation or after fermentation. This is done by raising the temp above 62*F for a min of 3 days to allow the yeast to clean up.

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19 days in and I'm at 1.022.
Pulled out of the fridge today to raise to 65 in hopes of getting a few more points out of it. That's a bit high for FG so I'm hoping to not have another stuck fermentation. I know the few lagers I've done in the past were slow, too so I'm going to be patient.

I'll go for 3-5 days at this higher temp and then back into the fridge for 2 weeks at ~42 to clear/lager before bottling. The yeast have plenty of time to get their act together.

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Trollby wrote:

If you plan on room temp bottle conditioning you donot have to do a D-rest since the first week to two weeks is same as d-rest.

I was going to but I am afraid that already being at 1.013 FG and after tasting it seems crisp, clear, and somewhat carbonated already; I might ruin or cause problems holding it at warm temps. I am thinking I will just follow my original thoughts(since they were guided by Fermentis direction re. Lager yeasts). Hopefully I don't ruin a good beer!

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03/11/2012

FG = 1.016 @ 50*F
ABV = 6.1%

Bottled with 61g Booster for about 2.8 C02, a little more than I wanted but i glooped the booster and got 61g (was going to do 55g for about 2.5 C02).

I got 22 - 12oz bottles

Taste was very good, had a very front grapefruit flavor.

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Did straight up.
Just pitched 11.5 W34/70 at 68*. filed to bottom Q

OG 1.058

Now comes th fun part, Temp Control...
gonna keep at 50-54* then Rest it.

Thanks for all the tips T and Imperial Crue!


:charlie:

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I have had my imperial Pilsner fermenting for 3 1/2 weeks. Did a D-rest on 2/25 for 4 days, and have had it at 46F since then, and gravity is at 1.010. When should I go ahead and bottle?

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Either bottle or move to a secondary.

I would not go past 5 weeks in the Primary

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Trollby wrote:

Either bottle or move to a secondary.

I would not go past 5 weeks in the Primary


Bottle, then carb at room temp for 2 weeks, then move to fridge for cold lagering?

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losman26 wrote:

Trollby wrote:

Either bottle or move to a secondary.

I would not go past 5 weeks in the Primary


Bottle, then carb at room temp for 2 weeks, then move to fridge for cold lagering?

Sounds like a plan

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Thanks for the fast reply Trollby! You're the best. One more question. How much priming sugar did you use for this one? Do you think I should use my auto-siphon to transfer to the other LBK?

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I've had this in the keg for a little over a week, and in an effort to keep the temperature low, the LBK is sitting on the basement slab, instead of on the bench. I'm hoping the slab acts as a temperature sink and keeps it below 60 degrees, although I have no reasonable way to gauge temperature, as the temp strip on the LBK only goes down to 60. My other brews are hovering just above 60, though, so I figure it should be fine.

I'm planning on going to this weekend (which will be two weeks), checking the gravity, and if I'm near FG, I'll bring it upstairs for a couple of days for a D-rest, then back down for at least another week.

Feedback? I'd appreciate it.

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Anyone bottle theirs yet? If so, what C02 volume did you use? The priming calculator has some premium pilsner's to be pretty highly carbed.

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losman26 wrote:

Thanks for the fast reply Trollby! You're the best. One more question. How much priming sugar did you use for this one? Do you think I should use my auto-siphon to transfer to the other LBK?

I had my LBK tipped back for the entire time and the yeast cake on the bottom was firm. I used the spigot and came almost 99% out with the only trub on the first 3oz glass I draw off anyways.

The beer was very clear and very tasty


FedoraDave wrote:

I've had this in the keg for a little over a week, and in an effort to keep the temperature low, the LBK is sitting on the basement slab, instead of on the bench. I'm hoping the slab acts as a temperature sink and keeps it below 60 degrees, although I have no reasonable way to gauge temperature, as the temp strip on the LBK only goes down to 60. My other brews are hovering just above 60, though, so I figure it should be fine.

I'm planning on going to this weekend (which will be two weeks), checking the gravity, and if I'm near FG, I'll bring it upstairs for a couple of days for a D-rest, then back down for at least another week.

Feedback? I'd appreciate it.

Sounds like a plan, as long as you are near FG d-rest is fine since very little fermentation is left and the D-rest may finish it off as it cleans up. Then back to the slab for chilling for a week or two more or bottling your choice

Beer-lord wrote:

Anyone bottle theirs yet? If so, what C02 volume did you use? The priming calculator has some premium pilsner's to be pretty highly carbed.

I was shooting for 2.5 or so and when pouring the booster in the hot water it gloobed and I got more than I wanted so I am looking at around 2.8 C02 so little high but not "Over-carb" high

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