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Imperial Pilsner Mr. Beer Seasonal - Brewed!

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4 day diacytel rest complete and it dropped another 5 points in the process to 1.017 which could be my terminal gravity.

It's going into cool storage to drop to about 55 again for a few days before I bring it down to true lager temps for at least 2 weeks - and as many as 4. I haven't decided yet if I'm going to lager in the keg for a while or bottle and lager in the bottles. I'll figure it out in the next two weeks.

If I'm at terminal gravity then I'm at 5.9% ABV which I have no issues with. It means I got ~72% apparent attenuation.

We'll see if I pick up a another 2 points over the next week or so. All in all, moving along just fine in my opinion.

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Alright, so I have had my IMP PILS in the bottles for a week now. These warm temps are killing me.70 degrees in march really? I put 1.5 tsp corn sugar in each 1L and .75 in each 1/2L. they seem slow to firm. This is my first lager... when I do my next I will def have a mini fidge; My wife thinks I'm nuts. Been shooting for 53deg cosistent through fermentation and bottle condition. Been closer to 55 lately. But the bottles dont seem to be getting for hard yet.
Am I just thinking this beer should act like an ale or should I be concerned? The sediment in the bottle is as much as I've ever seen in a MB recipe if not more.

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I'm bottling mine tonite. I could wait another few days but it's been long enough. I plan on putting the bottles back in the same fridge it's been lagering in instead of a warm house.
Any suggestions for what temperature I should set the fridge for to lager these bottles? And, if I condition the bottles at a low temp, should I prime normally or adjust the amount of priming sugar with the fridge temp? I'm not at all familiar with lagers and have no idea what to do.

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kget wrote:

Alright, so I have had my IMP PILS in the bottles for a week now. These warm temps are killing me.70 degrees in march really? I put 1.5 tsp corn sugar in each 1L and .75 in each 1/2L. they seem slow to firm. This is my first lager... when I do my next I will def have a mini fidge; My wife thinks I'm nuts. Been shooting for 53deg cosistent through fermentation and bottle condition. Been closer to 55 lately. But the bottles dont seem to be getting for hard yet.
Am I just thinking this beer should act like an ale or should I be concerned? The sediment in the bottle is as much as I've ever seen in a MB recipe if not more.

I just brewed my seasonal on Thursday night, but it was my understanding that the carbonation was to happen with 2 weeks at room temperature? Then back to cold conditioning in the 50s? That could be why your bottles aren't firming up...

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I have a question and hope you can help. I'm a newbie at brewing. I got the German hefeweizen which comes with a package of liquid wyeast. The package says to pour into a 5 gallon. But Mr beer is saying use the whole package. Mr beer is only 2 gallons. Do I need to use a little less than have of the yeast or all of it. Also the directions say's to break the inner package. I never felt anything inside the package but liquid. I still smacked it and have been waiting for it to swell but its not swelling. Do you have any suggestions for. Thanks for all your help.

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I have a question and hope you can help. I'm a newbie at brewing. I got the German hefeweizen which comes with a package of liquid wyeast. The package says to pour into a 5 gallon. But Mr beer is saying use the whole package. Mr beer is only 2 gallons. Do I need to use a little less than have of the yeast or all of it. Also the directions say's to break the inner package. I never felt anything inside the package but liquid. I still smacked it and have been waiting for it to swell but its not swelling. Do you have any suggestions for. Thanks for all your help.

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I have a question and hope you can help. I'm a newbie at brewing. I got the German hefeweizen which comes with a package of liquid wyeast. The package says to pour into a 5 gallon. But Mr beer is saying use the whole package. Mr beer is only 2 gallons. Do I need to use a little less than have of the yeast or all of it. Also the directions say's to break the inner package. I never felt anything inside the package but liquid. I still smacked it and have been waiting for it to swell but its not swelling. Do you have any suggestions for. Thanks for all your help.

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manosteel9423 wrote:


I just brewed my seasonal on Thursday night, but it was my understanding that the carbonation was to happen with 2 weeks at room temperature? Then back to cold conditioning in the 50s? That could be why your bottles aren't firming up...

I do remember reading that somewhere in all the Pilsner discussion. So, if this is the case, then you should prime based on the room temperature and not the cold conditioning temperatures?????
That would make sense.

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You want to prime based on the highest temperature achieved during fermentation.

You CAN carb at fermenting temps but it is going to be slow. Most will recommend that you carb for 2 weeks at room temp and then go back to lagering - which is what I do, too.

You will NOT pick up any off flavors by carbing at room temp. Your flavor profile was pretty much set during fermentation and the little amount that goes on with carbing isn't going to change that.

So - carb at room temp for 2 weeks after priming, then go back top the fridge to lager for however long you like. I plan on 4 weeks minimum of lagering before cracking a bottle as I intended this to be a spring drinker.

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Steven1979 wrote:

I have a question and hope you can help. I'm a newbie at brewing. I got the German hefeweizen which comes with a package of liquid wyeast. The package says to pour into a 5 gallon. But Mr beer is saying use the whole package. Mr beer is only 2 gallons. Do I need to use a little less than have of the yeast or all of it. Also the directions say's to break the inner package. I never felt anything inside the package but liquid. I still smacked it and have been waiting for it to swell but its not swelling. Do you have any suggestions for. Thanks for all your help.

S79,
Welcome abooard!
when you have a question that is off topic, just start another thread, as we try to kepp the flow going for simplicity sake.
Your question will be answered 99% of the time.
Brew on Bro!
:)

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Got the Pils bottled tonite. FG was higher than I thought but hasn't changed...1.015. I probably could have lagered another 3-4 days but it's done.
Tasted ok in the test tube. Nothing that I'm crazy about since I"m not a pils fan but it'll be great now that it's warm and after a workout or with all the boiled crawfish we eat this time of year.

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I'll probably do this one tomorrow as the Pens play Philly at 1230. I'll have friends over to grill and eat and it should be pretty quick. Just gonna do it as is with some - .5/.75 lbs - of Carapils.

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Just a question for some of the guys who have brewed this one a while back. I brewed this recipe a few days ago and followed the standard instructions. I did not leave the LBK at room temperature for a couple of days to kickstart the yeast like some had suggested and I had virtually no lag at all. Within 12 hours I had a fantastic, thick krausen that lasted for a couple of days. However, when I checked it today, the krausen was completely gone and the beer has cleared up ridiculously well for a beer that is only a few days old.

Is this normal for a lager? I've only brewed ales to this point and have never had a krausen disappear so quickly. In fact, I brewed an IPA two days before this one and it still has a thick krausen on it.

Not overly concerned about any of this, just curious...

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Lager is a low yeast, I had it when I did not 24 hour jump start have almost nothing notable but smell and trub on bottom

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Thanks Trollby! I've learned in my 3 months in this hobby not to panic about anything so I wasn't really concerned, just curious. I found it interesting that I got such an active krausen so quickly only to have it completely dissipate within a couple of days.

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Trollby wrote:

Lager is a low yeast, I had it when I did not 24 hour jump start have almost nothing notable but smell and trub on bottom

Curious also...
10 days in,
First Lager yeast, 4 in. White Trub at bottom, due to lager bottom ferm?
slight sweet/sulphur smell after 4-5 days, still a bit there. not a bad smell. I wondered how it would be afteyour EARLY posts on this thread.
Fairly clear in the middle of keg , though.

that bottomm trub is wild!

:ohmy:

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Kealia wrote:

You want to prime based on the highest temperature achieved during fermentation.

You CAN carb at fermenting temps but it is going to be slow. Most will recommend that you carb for 2 weeks at room temp and then go back to lagering - which is what I do, too.

You will NOT pick up any off flavors by carbing at room temp. Your flavor profile was pretty much set during fermentation and the little amount that goes on with carbing isn't going to change that.

So - carb at room temp for 2 weeks after priming, then go back top the fridge to lager for however long you like. I plan on 4 weeks minimum of lagering before cracking a bottle as I intended this to be a spring drinker.

yeah and it is...real slow. but I wanted my first lager to be soo good. I have been doing what I can to avoid off flavors.

But, just to beat a dead horse. I have read the same thing; prime based off of the highest fermentation temps. But I didnt do a D-rest but if I were to warm condition would yould you consider those the highest temps achieved. And if I had done a D-rest wouldn't you definitly have to consider those temps(for my next batch)?
thanks

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Since this is the largest string dealing with the imperial pilsner, I'm going to ask everyone here for help and advice.

I was near the d-rest stage of fermentation on my batch of the pilsner. This was after 3 weeks starting at 59 degrees. I know this is on the high side but that's the best I could do in my basement so I gave it a try. Due to the insane weather though, the 59 gradually moved up to the upper 60's. So by the time I wanted to start the d-rest, I think it really had already started and then some. I took a quick gravity reading and it came out to 1.012.

Reading thru this discussion, I noticed someone going thru the process of 2 weeks at 38 degrees after the d-rest. Not having much of an option, I threw the lbk into my fridge (upper 30's) which is where it's going to sit for 2 weeks before bottling, that is unless someone has an idea of what else I could try.

I would appreciate anyone's opinion on how I might save this batch.

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DID you taste the sample?

Might have some "steam beer" qualities to it since you hit higher temps on it.

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I did taste it and it seemed fine as 'beer' but not sure if it had the imperial pilsner taste. I've had a few steam beers in the past but not enough to know if it had those qualities.

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You shouldn't really have anything to "save". Unless you pick up some type of off-flavor or ester you won't really have anything to compare it to since you don't know what this batch is supposed to taste like.

If there's nothing wrong with it, proceed as you have planned and all should be just fine.

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This morning when changing my frozen bottles, I took one bottle out and looked at it.

Light bottle trub but looks perfectly clear.

I think I may sneak one at 4 weeks, 12 weeks would kill me

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DO IT! (I can say this so you're the guinea pig)

I'll be trying one at 4 weeks in the bottle (after 3 in primary, 3 days d-rest, and 1 in the keg lagering first) so I know whether I want to send some to a family wedding that I can't attend.

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Bottled today. 24 - 12oz bottles + 8oz tester.

That gives me two weeks to come up with a label before tossing them back into the fridge for a month.

Final gravity for me was 1.018. Higher than expected, but beer happens.

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I'm bottling this Sunday. I had a three-day D-rest and then put it back in the basement, but it's been unusually warm this week, and I don't think the LBK got below 62 or so.

FG is good, and my taste test pleased me. I'm looking forward to this one. It'll be nice for around Memorial Day.

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I just took a taste today after being in the bottle almost 2 weeks. It was good, nothing comparable to the Dubbel. Kind of reminded me of Sam's winter Lager. I will probably wait another month or so before sampling any more.

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Bottled this weekend after 3 weeks in the LBK. I hit 1.012 for FG @ 60 degrees. Taste test leads me to believe this will be a good batch. Due to the weather recently, my basement temps got up to the mid 60's but with the keg on the slab and covered it was probably several degrees below that.

Going to let the bottles carb (4 cubes in each bottle) for two weeks and then refrigerate. Can't wait!

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Brewed mine up on President's Day...

Meet the Boys of Summer... The BigPapaG Mt. Rushmore Series!

Four Presidential Pilsners... Identical with the exception of the yeast used in each...

Each carefully brewed to an OG of 1.060 and fermented at 52*F for three weeks.

A rise to 64*F for 4 days provided the necessary 'D' Rest, followed by a drop again to 52*F where they sat in session for another week.

Bottled and carbed to 2.4vCO2, these stately brews will lager for another two months before taking their turn in service of the people!

GW features the SafAle Weinhenstephan W-34/70

Thomas J. enjoys the SafAle VLB (Berlin Institute) S-23

Teddy showcases the Wyeast 2007 St. Louis strain

And Abe finishes with the Wyeast 2001 Urquell strain

Can't wait for summer! B)

e73af240.jpg

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Bottled mine yesterday after 3 1/2 weeks, I'm gonna call it Wing and a prayer Imperial Pilsner since the temps got up. Though my final sat at 1.012 and it tasted really good, I think I'm gonna let this one sit for a month.

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Mine will be in the bottle 4 weeks this weekend, 2 weeks at room temp, 2 weeks in the fridge. I'm gonna try one, the rest will stay in the fridge till memorial day.

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Well here it is, great head & retention, first sip seemed a little to hoppy for me, but the flavor mellows, reminds me a lot of the pilothouse pilsner which I loved.

Now if I can just find the strength to leave the rest sit till memorial day!

photobucket-13449-1333241726734.jpg

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Was it cloudy or chilled glass?

Looking at mine through the bottle looks perfectly clear.

Though have not poured one yet

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"Trollby" post=250176 said:

Was it cloudy or chilled glass?

Looking at mine through the bottle looks perfectly clear.

Though have not poured one yet

The beer was clear, the glass had a lot of condensation on it.

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I have a quick question about D-rest for those in the know...my IP has been in the keg 16 days now, so I'm starting to plan the rest of the cycle. I've read that many have done a two day D-rest after about 3 weeks in the LBK, then back to fermenting temps for another week.

Is this the best way to go? That would mean, for me, I would be bringing the LBK into my 66* fermenting closet on Friday until Sunday, then back to the basement floor (about 52*) until the following weekend?

Should I do a gravity reading prior to the D-rest? If so, what should I be looking for prior to the D-rest? Should it be close to the target FG?

Thanks in advance for your help.

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The d-rest needs to be done near the end of fermentation or just after finished.

After 16 days you should be fine, 2-3 days at 62-65*F and back to lager temps for a week will be fine


You can do a gravity reading if you like, that is up to you.

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Thanks Trollby...so you think its okay to start the D-rest now? I was planning to wait until the weekend, but the sooner, obviously, the better.

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Personally I wouldn't start the D-rest until you've verified fermentation is pretty much complete...if you start it too soon then drop back to lager temps while fermentation is still taking place you may end up undoing what you just did. 16 days is *probably* fine, but I usually don't even think about a D-rest till three weeks. Lagers don't like to be rushed...

Cheers!

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Thanks KZ...that was my original thought, but Trollby got me excited! Haha.

I think, just to be safe without doing a gravity reading, I'll wait until Friday to start the D-rest.

Thanks for all the help guys!

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Cheers everybody. My first batch was brewed on 2/14. Steeped Carapils & added 1/2 pack of booster. Racked to glass bottles & primed with corn sugar on 3/10.
Pitched re-hydrated yeast at 65 degrees & left it in my garage the whole time always in the temp range. Brought inside the last 3 days before I racked. Worked out perfectly.
I already drank 5 - 12 oz bottles :gulp:
I wanted to leave them at 65 degrees in the bottles for 2 1/2 weeks then in the fridge until 4/7. Needless to say I couldn't make it. :laugh:
This has to be one of the best brews I ever made. It's 5 star all the way. :cheers:
I have another batch bottled on the shelf & 1 more can to brew. I'm sure you guys will love yours too. :barman:
Here's the labels:

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Beerlabelman, did you ever get this below 65? I'm curious how well the yeast worked compared to what a number of us have done. That is, lagered at about 50ish for a few weeks, D-rest then back again for a week.

Mine has been in the bottles 2 weeks and I just put them in the mini fridge at about 53 for a few more weeks. I have a good supply of others to drink so I'm in no rush. The weather is only going to get hotter anyway so saving this for summer is perfect.
I am glad to hear your approval. That's a good sign for the rest of us.

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If I read his email right he pitched at 65 but the floor of the basement was in temp range the whole time.

The only thing I would call out is:
Beerlabelman wrote:

Steeped Carapils

Dude, that's sooooo March 2012. Where have you been? :P

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Hey Fella's - Yes, I cooled my keg down to 45-50 range the whole time it was in my garage. As for the carapils, K-Man I did not know that, but I did steep for a long time & the beer is clear as day with awesome head retention. Now you guys are going to make me pour one & take a picture to post
So many books/sites say so many different things & I'm not that scientific with my brews. So all I can tell you is if I put this in a contest I'm pretty sure it would win. I'll bring it to some of my pro brewing buddies to sample in the next few days to get they're opinion. :cheers:

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I'm having one right now. :gulp: yummy delicious :drinking: Here's some pics. Note the clarity, head retention, etc. You guys are going to love this brew. Not worth the wait. Pop one ASAP. :laugh:

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I've been known to pop one early but that discussion really belongs in the off-topic forums....

Glad you are enjoying your beer Steve!

(Not to cross threads, but what I took from that other thread is that if you mash carapils with a base malt like 2-row it's going to add that much MORE in terms of head retention and body. I never had hazy beers either)

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Hey K - We're allowed to cross threads once a month. I just made a brew where I mashed the 2 row & the carapils. I made a mistake in adding a little too much water but made up for it with more DME.
The fermentation took off like a rocket. So I'll check for better head retention in this new single hopped brew. Cheers, Steve

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Here it is!
dsci2509.jpg

Perfectly clear, pulled right from the laging chest at 48*F.

Taste is OUTSTANDING!

Go Brewers!

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Wow, is it really that dark (compared to a normal pilsner)?
Or is it just the table in the background, the lighting, etc.?

Just curious. I'm popping mine into the fridge tomorrow to start lagering (carbing is done) so I still have 2-4 weeks to wait depending on my patience.

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I really wished I had gotten in on this before supplies were exhausted. Now I'm just waiting for the summer seasonal announcement.


Rick

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So very glad to hear this. How long have you had it in the lager chest? How long total in the bottles?
I think I need at least 2 more weeks before I try the test beer but I'm really could have used one of these after just cutting my grass.
Enjoy!

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"Beer-lord" post=251293 said:

So very glad to hear this. How long have you had it in the lager chest? How long total in the bottles?
I think I need at least 2 more weeks before I try the test beer but I'm really could have used one of these after just cutting my grass.
Enjoy!

My beer never left the lager chest, I fermented in there, did the D-rest and then back in for a week.
I then bottled and put right back in the chest for the last 4 weeks.

Time line:

Brewed 2-12-12 (placed in chest 2-13-12 @ 48*F)
D-rest 2-29 to 3-3 (temp 64*F)
Bottled 3-11-12 (placed back in chest @ 48*F)
1st pour 4-05-12

Yes I know early, I was planning on waiting 8 weeks, just had to try one.

--- Edit ---
I should add after Just ONE, if the rest are as good this will be my favorite Seasonal so far!

The Hefeweizen last summer was my favorite before this for straite-up brew, but the Modified Dubbel I made with the belgian candi syrup was best seasonal but was mod so not the same

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Life is good! I'm only 8 days behind you so in about that time, I'll also test one.
I can say, mine are looking very clear at this point. Usually, I could care less but as I've never done a true lager (at lager temps) I wasn't sure what to expect.

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"Kealia" post=251274 said:

Wow, is it really that dark (compared to a normal pilsner)?
Or is it just the table in the background, the lighting, etc.?

Just curious. I'm popping mine into the fridge tomorrow to start lagering (carbing is done) so I still have 2-4 weeks to wait depending on my patience.


Mine came out pretty dark as well, but I thought it was because the DME I used to carb it. So far it's a good seasonal, but doesn't even compare to the Dubbel.

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Help. I did the recipe straight from MB. fermented in 50 deg cooler for three Weeks. Bottled on 3-10, been in the 50° cooler since. Did not d rest. I'm I still ok?

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Guest System Admin

You could take them out and room temp for a week and then back to cooler for rest of the conditioning stage

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A d-rest isn't necessary. It's more important if you pitched the yeast at a higher temp and left it for a while before getting it into it's fermenting temp range.

If you pitched at 50 and left it there the whole time, you're fine.
If you pitched it warmer and then brought it down, you're still probably fine.

Taste one and you will know pretty quickly but don't worry too much about it.

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If you put them in the 50-degree cooler right after bottling it's going to take a while for them to carb up. They could JUST be getting carb'd now so any additional time conditioning is up to you. don't be surprised if it's very low on the carb, though. Most people will carb at room temp and then go back to cold lagering.

Everybody is going to vary on this one.
For example, I did 2 weeks at 68 to carb and then plan on lagering for 4 weeks before even trying one.

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I just brewed mine up last night, but I do have a AG Maibock that's been lagering for several weeks now.

Just out of curiousity, when lagering is done, can I put the bottles into my normal cellar to wait for them to go "online" or do they have to stay lagering until I'm ready to drink them? Common sense tells me the answer is the former.

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I would think that you could just leave in cellar as long as the temp does not get say over 70*F or so for as long as you like.

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Bug, I can only speculate here... I'm not sure what value there would be in lagering for a while and then going to warmer temps. Have you bottled yet, or is the lagering occurring in the keg?

If you're lagering in the keg, then bottling I would *think* that would be just fine.
If you already bottled and are lagering in the bottles and then moving to cellar temps (warmer) I wouldn't think it's going to HURT anything, perhaps it just negates the benefits gained from lagering in the first place?

Keep in mind I'm talking out of my ass here....happy to shut up and let somebody else speak up that can back up speculation with better information ;)

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Kealia,

My procedure for the Maibock:

In the LBK:
1. 24hrs 62*
2. 21days 50*

Bottled:
3. 14days 62* (carbing)
4. 28days 38* (lagering)

After step #4 is where my question pertains. If I understand you correctly it sounds like I have to keep the bottles in the lagerator until I drink them, correct?

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"BugLaden" post=252413 said:

If I understand you correctly it sounds like I have to keep the bottles in the lagerator until I drink them, correct?

Obviously you missed the most important part of my post:
"Keep in mind I'm talking out of my ass here" :laugh:

Honestly, I'm not sure. Speculating, I would say that any benefits gained during the lagering might be lost when you warm them up, but I really am speculating here. I view this similar to cold-crashing and then letting the beer warm back up before bottling.

Maybe there are benefits as far as flavor melding, etc. that stay - I just don't know.

Perhaps you could use this as the grounds for a test? Leave a bottle or two in the fridge if you have room and take the rest out. When you are ready to drink them, chill a bottle for 24-48 hours (from the cellar group) and compare to the one that has been lagering the whole time?

I'd love to know the results.

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I took a 22oz bottle of the Seasonal Pilsner to our weekly music jam night and everyone was pretty much shocked. We all like the same type of strong, hoppy beer but all agree that this SP was very good and refreshing. Many said it was the most commercially tasting beer they've tasted from homebrew. That was a compliment not a negative.
The 1/4 lb of carapils did this justice. It was carbed superbly and though light, was not Coors/Bud/Miller at all.
I'm still going to lager this for another 4 weeks before hitting it again but after just a tad more than 4 weeks in the bottle at lager temps, I'm very impressed.

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Newbie Success!!!

I brewed two batches of the Imperial Pilsner as my 3rd and 4th batches. I live in the desert with cold temps so I fermented them in my garage for about 2.5 weeks. Bottled and let them sit for almost six weeks. Put a couple in the fridge and after a week tried one last night!
Absolutely delicious!!!!
If I crack another in the next day or so, I will post pics - I hope this one brews up great for everyone else here too.
While I am here, I would also like to thank everyone for all the great tips and knowledge. Checking these posts has been so informative, and helped me learn to relax and do things the correct way in this great new hobby!
Happy Friday the 13th everyone!

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I'm finally ready to bottle this thing! It spent 3 weeks at 52* then D-rest for 3 days at 64* then back to the 52* room for another 6 days.

My question is, and I know its been answered already but I don't feel like going through 8 pages of posts to find it, what temperature do I use to calculate the priming sugar? My understanding is that its the highest temperature reached during fermentation, so is it 64*? Or, since fermentation was primarily done at that point, is it 52*?

Thanks,
Mano

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"Kealia" post=251274 said:

Wow, is it really that dark (compared to a normal pilsner)?

The one that I tried was that exact color. I thought something had gone wrong, especially since I wasn't able to monitor or control temps during fermentation.

It was darned tasty, though!

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"BugLaden" post=252187 said:

I just brewed mine up last night, but I do have a AG Maibock that's been lagering for several weeks now.

Just out of curiousity, when lagering is done, can I put the bottles into my normal cellar to wait for them to go "online" or do they have to stay lagering until I'm ready to drink them? Common sense tells me the answer is the former.

How often do you find lagers on the regular shelf of a store? All the time right? Not at lager temps? Once it's done conditioning, store it whatever temps you got me thinks.

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"manosteel9423" post=253068 said:


My question is, and I know its been answered already but I don't feel like going through 8 pages of posts to find it, what temperature do I use to calculate the priming sugar? My understanding is that its the highest temperature reached during fermentation, so is it 64*? Or, since fermentation was primarily done at that point, is it 52*?

It's the highest temp. The highest temp is where the most CO2 is released from suspension so that determines how much is left as residual CO2 in the beer.

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I just bottled my IP! Very excited for this one. Came out very clear. I reached a FG of 1.014 with an OG of 1.062, so I had pretty good attenuation and have ended up with a beer just over 6% ABV.

The hydro sample tasted clean and crisp. I bottled in 450mL Grolsch swingtops with the exception of a 1L swingtop that had previously held a sparkling cider. I plan to carb for two weeks at about 68* then back onto the basement floor at about 54* to lager for at least 4 weeks. Should be enjoying these sometime in June!

I hate being patient!!!

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Mr Beer Imperial Pilsner! Easily the best beer at Home brew Club tonight out of 12 brews. And the other brews we destroyed :shoot: were damn good too.
I didn't have the heart to tell my fellow members that it was only 1 can of HME + 1/2 pack of booster :laugh: & steeped carapils. But it just goes to show you that if you have good ingredients, sanitize properly, ferment at the correct temps, & just follow the Mr Beer instructions, anyone can make a top notch brew. A good label helps too. :barman:
[attachment=7816]FeelingAlrightImperialPilsner.JPG[/attachment]

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Got to crack one open last night with dinner, it was Fabulous!!!! I wish I had ordered like four cans of it!

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My wife just loves it. She insists on putting a bit of orange in it.
I have to say that I'm very impressed with it myself. If you were to tell me it was from a craft brewery, I'd have a hard time believing it.
I think they should offer this on a regular basis for those who want to try a true lager.

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Hey Doc...I'm interested in how long you've had it in the bottles? I put mine in the bottle last week and wasn't planning on trying for another month or so, but I'm curious as to other people's results with this one.

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I waited 4 weeks in the bottle, but I had mine 4 weeks in LBK.

It is now coming up on 6th week so might try one more and see how they are aging ;)

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Mine have been in the bottle since 3/23. I plan on trying an 8oz tester later this week but the first full bottle will wait until about 5/4.

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"Beer-lord" post=255107 said:

My wife just loves it. She insists on putting a bit of orange in it.
I have to say that I'm very impressed with it myself. If you were to tell me it was from a craft brewery, I'd have a hard time believing it.
I think they should offer this on a regular basis for those who want to try a true lager.

My wife took her first sip and then did a little Happy Snoppy Dance and joyiously saying we have beer again in the house! Verry Funny. :banana:

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"manosteel9423" post=255109 said:

Hey Doc...I'm interested in how long you've had it in the bottles? I put mine in the bottle last week and wasn't planning on trying for another month or so, but I'm curious as to other people's results with this one.

I want to say 4 weeks, I'll have to verify when I get home still at work. But it was in the LBK 3.5 weeks.

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"Docniel" post=255132 said:

"manosteel9423" post=255109 said:

Hey Doc...I'm interested in how long you've had it in the bottles? I put mine in the bottle last week and wasn't planning on trying for another month or so, but I'm curious as to other people's results with this one.

I want to say 4 weeks, I'll have to verify when I get home still at work. But it was in the LBK 3.5 weeks.

Okay now that I am home and the girls are in bed, here are my notes:
Brewed: 2Mar12
Bottled: 27Mar12 ( I wanted to go longer but we hit a warm spell and I didn't want to risk it)
Length of fermentation: 3 1/2 weeks
Put the first one in the Fridge: 18April12
Cracked: 22Apr12
So in bottles one day shy of a month. Hoped that helped.
I might add:
I wanted to go longer, but we got tired of harvesting bottles

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Thanks Doc. Were the bottles at room temp from 03/27-04/18? I'm planning to leave mine at room temp for two weeks then back to the basement room where it fermented for 4 weeks at sub-60*.

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OOPS sorry, didn't see this. After bottling I let them carb for two weeks and then we got a cold snap so I moved them to the garage where they sat.

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[attachment=7877]043.JPG[/attachment]


HELP!!! :)


Got a late start on the IP but am unsure as to whether or not to D-rest, or to give the LBK a few more days.

I've been at about 48* now for 21 days. Just took a sample and got a reading of 1.020 after a starting read of 1.062. Sample was very cloudy and trubby.

What say ye?

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Did you flush the spigot before sampling?

I always run off a couple oz into a cup so the hydro sample is not 30% trub

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"Trollby" post=256684 said:

Did you flush the spigot before sampling?

I always run off a couple oz into a cup so the hydro sample is not 30% trub

no sir, I did not. I usually work under the premise that I don't want to waste a drop, but maybe I should try that in a couple days.

I have been fermenting on the low side. 48* is really the warmest it's been, but it's also been pretty steady.

This is only my second batch, the first - WCPA - was great, but I'm worried about this one for some reason.

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1.020 still seems a bit high compared to most reports in here, but it isn't completely out of the range of being done. If it were me, I'd do a d-rest for two days, then stick it back in the cold room until next weekend. At that point, it should certainly be ready to bottle.

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thanks,

I think I might raise the temp a bit....somewhere around 52-53 and then take another read. Got a suspicion it may have been on the cool side in fermenting. Will give it a few days at that temp then d-rest it for 2-3 before I bottle. If it ain't right then, it won't get there! :)

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W-34/70 will work down to 45*F but will be very slow

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Have a few tonight, man this beer is great!

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just tried my first pour, 3 days shy of 4 weeks in the bottle and had only been in the fridge 4 or 5 hrs. Nice psst on opening, good head on the pour, good color for the style. Then the smell test, ok but different then I expected, then the taste, also different then I expected, not bad but not what I thought. I'm thinking a few more weeks and a few days in the fridge I might like it alot better. I think I like last years spring seasonal better, but I'll wait a little more before I decide.

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Berryman...I'm just about 3 weeks in the bottle and couldn't resist putting one in the fridge this morning either. I have the same feelings you do. Nice colour, good carb, although not much retention. The aroma and the flavor, though, are not at all what I was expecting. It almost has a residual sweetness to it.

I'm sure that my impatience is betraying this brew, but it isn't as crisp as I was expecting.

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"manosteel9423" post=257741 said:

Berryman...I'm just about 3 weeks in the bottle and couldn't resist putting one in the fridge this morning either. I have the same feelings you do. Nice colour, good carb, although not much retention. The aroma and the flavor, though, are not at all what I was expecting. It almost has a residual sweetness to it.

I'm sure that my impatience is betraying this brew, but it isn't as crisp as I was expecting.


Yes it was a sweetness, I was thinking maybe because I did a carapils steep. did have good retention though. And yes thought being a lager it would be more crisp. have done other lagers the same way with better results. I think more time will bring it around. I'll post again in a few weeks.

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This is from the Saflager yeast, one of the things many lager brewers don't like about Saflager is the sweetness

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So the sweetness will not condition out, Trollby?

Don't get me wrong, the beer was quite good, just not quite what I was expecting.

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Keep in mind that I haven't tried mine yet and have no experience with this yeast prior to this brew - but if Trollby is saying that this yeast leaves some sweetness behind as part of it's profile I wouldn't expect it to go away.

That would be like the banana and close aspects of a hef yeast eventually conditioning out.

Now, if somebody that has actual experience with this yeast says different I will gladly defer to their hands-on experience - but I would be surprised to hear it.

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"manosteel9423" post=257794 said:

So the sweetness will not condition out, Trollby?

Don't get me wrong, the beer was quite good, just not quite what I was expecting.

W-34/70 is not as noticeable as the S-23 for sweetness since it is a cleaner lager yeast but one of my oldest friends who lives in a different state and is an AG brewer for years recommended switching the Yeast to "Bavarian Lager Liquid Yeast" he stated it will give you more true lager taste without the sweetness from Saflager.

On the other hand, my wife loves the sweetness in the GF beers using Saflager, and I don't mind it.

I plan on doing my next batch with the Bavarian Lager Liquid Yeast to compare.

BTW....

Last night had some friends over and we polished off a few, they thought it was awesome, one asked if it could be made into an IPA since it was pretty hoppy already.

Neat thought

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