Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Neadric

Belgian Tripel (first attempt at my own recipe)

Recommended Posts

Hey Guys,

So i just went through beer calculus and after some research put together a Tripel recipe. Here's the link, any input on this would be awesome! Be gentile :blink:

http://hopville.com/recipe/1154514/belgian-tripel-recipes/neadrics-tripel


I was also thinking about adding some orange peel in there, but not sure exactly when they would go in. I'm thinking i'd have them in there for most of my fermentation.

thanks :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgot to mention, I'll be doing a grain steep with the grains i have in there. Not quite ready for a mash yet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're on the right track, but here's a couple of things I see:

- Under the hops, you have it set to a 4 gallon boil...lower that down to what you'll really be doing and you'll see the IBU's drop. You need a 60 minute hop boil

- It's too dark for a tripel. Consider using pilsen LME, and lowering the crystal and caravienne quit a bit, perhaps omitting the crystal altogether.

- Tripel's traditionally use sugar to up the ABV and thin it out. Maybe swap out the DME for sugar (table or Belgian candi).

- To keep the color light you can also do a good bit of the LME as a late addition to keep it from darkening during the boil. This will also improve your hop utilization if you're doing a small-ish boil.

- I'd skip the orange peel. That would work fine in a wit, but here I think you want spice characteristics to come from the yeast.

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea the candy sugar is the one thing i didn't add, just because i wasn't sure on the amount. Gonna mess areound with it some more

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could replace the pound of DME with a pound of candi sugar, though with the amount of LME you have that might tip you too far. Maybe drop the DME to a half pound. Play around with it, but I think you'd be safe up to 20% of the fermentables being the sugar.

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking pretty good... I'd add a little bit of bittering hop, say 1/4 oz, boil with LME for 60 minutes, adding sugar with 15 minutes left in the boil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rebel_B wrote:

Looking pretty good... I'd add a little bit of bittering hop, say 1/4 oz, boil with LME for 60 minutes, adding sugar with 15 minutes left in the boil.


+1, the IBU's still look a bit off. I'm also thinking the amount of carvienne is high. I haven't worked with it, but 12oz is quite a bit and I don't know how much flavor it will impart. I would lower it to 8oz tops (which will also help to lower the color a bit), and maybe add back in a bit of the DME to up the gravity just a bit.

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yet another edit. I added a bit of Perle at 60 mins to add some IBU's, and threw back some DME in there. It says FG should be around 1.014, but i can't for the life of me get it down to that hehe.

I figure a little bit higher than recommended should be fine... man this is so much fun :D

EDIT: Should include the link huh?

http://hopville.com/recipe/1154749/belgian-tripel-recipes/neadrics-tripel-2012-02-14-version-alt-alt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

I think your little off on this being a Tripel, Belgian beers are rated by grades that are basically Belgian do single-double-tripple strength or 3% - 6% - 9%

So:
Tripel should be 9% ABV +
Dubbel is 6% - 9%
Ale = 3% - 6%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i was thinking that too, but i'm not sure how i would raise the abv to that level without messing up the FG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

Tapist High Gravity yeast is designed to help with this.

Make a 7% brew or so and "Feed" the yeast 2-3 times Belgian Candi. Belgian beers are higher in Adjuncts than normal beers (well not like most Mr. Beer recipes that have high adjuncts and lower ABV).

This is done by brew, wait for the Krausen to fall (day 3-7) feed 1# Candi, wait 3-7 days feed Candi, etc...

I believe Mashani has done a ton and stated this works the best with High Gravity yeast, what I am planning when I do my Trippel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trollby wrote:

Tapist High Gravity yeast is designed to help with this.

Make a 7% brew or so and "Feed" the yeast 2-3 times Belgian Candi. Belgian beers are higher in Adjuncts than normal beers (well not like most Mr. Beer recipes that have high adjuncts and lower ABV).

This is done by brew, wait for the Krausen to fall (day 3-7) feed 1# Candi, wait 3-7 days feed Candi, etc...

I believe Mashani has done a ton and stated this works the best with High Gravity yeast, what I am planning when I do my Trippel.

oh neat, that's very interesting. How would i plan out the amount of the belgian candi sugar? just divide up into even portions of the 1lb that i plan to use?

And if so, would i substitute the Candi Sugar with more DME(for example) in the initial brew?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think switching the Candi out of the brew and in the feed would work, use something that will be the color you want and flavor you want (example = if more Witbier Trippel add 1# Wheat DME or for light add some Golden Light DME)

--- edit ---

for the amount of sugar figure the amount for the ABV and divide by the number of feeds.

I thing switching out the candi in the brew the feeds would be about 2# candi to be about 9%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cool ty for the advice, i think i'm going to have a go at that and see how it works out.

So i'm thinking ad 1lb of candi about 5 days in, and the other at 10... (not exact amounts, but just making sure i'm getting the concept right) I'll post updated recipe after i get home.

:laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

Hopefully Mashani will chime in since he has more experience with this style, but I based my replies off his chats with me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO you've got enough sugar right now...the 1 lb is already 22% of your bill. If you want to pull half or all of that sugar out for 1 or 2 feedings I think that would be good. If you want to up the ABV and add more sugar, I think you need to up the malt a bit too.

And I wouldn't worry too much about the FG...I almost always come in below what BeerCalculus projects. FWIW, I took a gravity check of my tripel today (17 days). I used Wyeast 1214 with a feeding at 7 days, and I'm down to 1.006 (8.1% ABV).

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

KZ wrote:

IMHO you've got enough sugar right now...the 1 lb is already 22% of your bill. If you want to pull half or all of that sugar out for 1 or 2 feedings I think that would be good. If you want to up the ABV and add more sugar, I think you need to up the malt a bit too.

And I wouldn't worry too much about the FG...I almost always come in below what BeerCalculus projects. FWIW, I took a gravity check of my tripel today (17 days). I used Wyeast 1214 with a feeding at 7 days, and I'm down to 1.006 (8.1% ABV).

Cheers!

I only stated 2# as example, I believe if he uses 4.5# Malt and about 1# Candi he might be at 9% or so, since we switch out the Candi at brew and do it as a feed step but you use it in the calulation/recipe stage to get "idea" of your brew. The Hydro test will be off since doing additions in stages

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trollby wrote:

KZ wrote:

IMHO you've got enough sugar right now...the 1 lb is already 22% of your bill. If you want to pull half or all of that sugar out for 1 or 2 feedings I think that would be good. If you want to up the ABV and add more sugar, I think you need to up the malt a bit too.

And I wouldn't worry too much about the FG...I almost always come in below what BeerCalculus projects. FWIW, I took a gravity check of my tripel today (17 days). I used Wyeast 1214 with a feeding at 7 days, and I'm down to 1.006 (8.1% ABV).

Cheers!

I only stated 2# as example, I believe if he uses 4.5# Malt and about 1# Candi he might be at 9% or so, since we switch out the Candi at brew and do it as a feed step but you use it in the calulation/recipe stage to get "idea" of your brew. The Hydro test will be off since doing additions in stages

Agreed...I understood it was an example, but I think the OP was looking to run with the 2#, and based on the recipe he has (only 3lb malt) I was concerned about the sugar/malt ratio if he added another full pound without understanding the balance to shoot for.

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yea i was most likely going to adjust it to fit it properly so i can do a feeding or 2. I'd need about 4.5# of malt like you said, which i'm sure i can adjust for. I'll post a slightly more up to date recipe later tonight, getting ready to help gf make her first batch :)

Edit: i couldn't resist and made some adjustmets. Took the 1# of sugar out and added in 1.5# of DME... so it should be about a total of 4.5#

The abv went up to about 7.9


http://hopville.com/recipe/1155116/belgian-tripel-recipes/neadrics-tripel-2012-02-14-version-alt-alt-alt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

I would think 1# candi would add 1.2% - 1.5% ABV so put you at 9.1 - 9.4 Total, if you do 2 feeds each would be about 1/2# candi with about 1/2 cup water (boiled).

Just pour SLOWLY do not stir or aerate, the yeast will find it and do their job

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool ty for the advice. Tripels are my favorite type of beer so i wanted to make sure i make a good one. Looking to brew this in the next week or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neadric wrote:

yea i was most likely going to adjust it to fit it properly so i can do a feeding or 2. I'd need about 4.5# of malt like you said, which i'm sure i can adjust for. I'll post a slightly more up to date recipe later tonight, getting ready to help gf make her first batch :)

Edit: i couldn't resist and made some adjustmets. Took the 1# of sugar out and added in 1.5# of DME... so it should be about a total of 4.5#

The abv went up to about 7.9


http://hopville.com/recipe/1155116/belgian-tripel-recipes/neadrics-tripel-2012-02-14-version-alt-alt-alt

Don't take this wrong, but you kind of took some steps backwards from some of the really good advice you got from others here earlier.

You should remove some DME and use plain table sugar or dextrose or clear belgian candi sugar to replace it. Otherwise you beer will have far too much body. A tripel *needs* sugar to lighten the body, unless you are mashing your own pils, and mash at a very low temp. Even then it still probably needs some. You should use sugar up to close to 20% of your bill with that high of an OG.

Belgians call this making the beer more "digestable". A thick heavy bodied beer is not a tripel. They should seem to the pallet that they are no where near as high of an gravity beer as they actually are.

As other folks have mentioned you should brew without the sugar in the wort, and then feed it after krausen falls. This will let the yeast work more effectivly without getting stressed out by the high OG and adjust to the alcahol levels more effectivly. With some yeasts like Trappist High Gravity, you will actually get better attenuation by doing this as well, which also helps to dry out the beer and make it more "digestable".

Lightening the body also allows the lovely yeast flavors and aromas to shine through the malt, and those wonderful/unique flavors and aromas are really what Belgians are about.

One other bit of advice, based on brewing many such beers, some with hops like Perle and Northern Brewer as the bittering hop, and others with nothing but low AA nobel hops and/or hops like styrian goldings, is that I'd ditch the perle and replace it with more and/or a longer boil of a true low AA nobel hop. The beers always come out better when I only use true nobel hops, even for bittering. The bittering balances the malt but you don't "notice" it, where with the higher AA hops, there is a touch of noticable bitter/harshness. With this style of beer it's best if you don't notice, as this kind of beer isn't about hops, it's about the yeast and how it interacts with delicate/subtle malt flavors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mashani wrote:

Neadric wrote:

yea i was most likely going to adjust it to fit it properly so i can do a feeding or 2. I'd need about 4.5# of malt like you said, which i'm sure i can adjust for. I'll post a slightly more up to date recipe later tonight, getting ready to help gf make her first batch :)

Edit: i couldn't resist and made some adjustmets. Took the 1# of sugar out and added in 1.5# of DME... so it should be about a total of 4.5#

The abv went up to about 7.9


http://hopville.com/recipe/1155116/belgian-tripel-recipes/neadrics-tripel-2012-02-14-version-alt-alt-alt

Don't take this wrong, but you kind of took some steps backwards from some of the really good advice you got from others here earlier.

You should remove some DME and use plain table sugar or dextrose or clear belgian candi sugar to replace it. Otherwise you beer will have far too much body. A tripel *needs* sugar to lighten the body, unless you are mashing your own pils, and mash at a very low temp. Even then it still probably needs some. You should use sugar up to close to 20% of your bill with that high of an OG.

Belgians call this making the beer more "digestable". A thick heavy bodied beer is not a tripel. They should seem to the pallet that they are no where near as high of an gravity beer as they actually are.

As other folks have mentioned you should brew without the sugar in the wort, and then feed it after krausen falls. This will let the yeast work more effectivly without getting stressed out by the high OG and adjust to the alcahol levels more effectivly. With some yeasts like Trappist High Gravity, you will actually get better attenuation by doing this as well, which also helps to dry out the beer and make it more "digestable".

Lightening the body also allows the lovely yeast flavors and aromas to shine through the malt, and those wonderful/unique flavors and aromas are really what Belgians are about.

One other bit of advice, based on brewing many such beers, some with hops like Perle and Northern Brewer as the bittering hop, and others with nothing but low AA nobel hops and/or hops like styrian goldings, is that I'd ditch the perle and replace it with more and/or a longer boil of a true low AA nobel hop. The beers always come out better when I only use true nobel hops, even for bittering. The bittering balances the malt but you don't "notice" it, where with the higher AA hops, there is a touch of noticable bitter/harshness. With this style of beer it's best if you don't notice, as this kind of beer isn't about hops, it's about the yeast and how it interacts with delicate/subtle malt flavors.

+1 on up to around 20% sugar...

Belgian Candi Sugar (clear in this case as a tripel is usually fairly light in color) but Table Sugar will work just as well... There isn't a noticable difference in taste... It's contribution, as mashani said, is in lightening the body and assisting the yeast to increase the attenuation...

+1 on the sheer beauty of Noble Hops... Something about the lower Alpha Acid value and the presence of other desirable compounds... Relatively high Humulene and relatively low cohumulone values seem to be hallmarks of the Noble Hop varieties... As mashani said, using more of them provides a smooth hop profile that is better enjoyed in
a Belgian than a Higher AA hop.

Oh... And Trappist High Gravity is fairly aggressive... Prepare for a blow over... :woohoo:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I would go either 4# DME or 5# LME and skip mix. Steep with Carapils for some body and head

Adding 1# clear candi

Batch: 2.25 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.098 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 36 IBU
Recipe Color: 4° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.024
Alcohol by Volume: 9.5%
Alcohol by Weight: 7.4%

Ingredients
-----------
Briess DME - Pilsen Light 4.00 lb, Extract, Extract
Candi Sugar, Clear (Belgian) 1.00 lb, Sugar, Other (1/2# fed twice day 6 and day 12)
CaraPils - [body, Head] 0.25 lb, Grain, Steeped

Perle 1.00 oz, Pellet, 40 minutes
Saaz Czech) 0.50 oz, Pellet, 20 minutes
Tettnanger (U.S.) 0.50 oz, Pellet, 8 minutes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the help with this, really learning a lot about tripels. i have a free LBK now that i bottled the Abbey Dubbel, so once i get this recipe figured out i'll brew it up. Gonna mess around with QBrew when i have some free time at work, and post my final one taking all the suggestions into consideration. Again, thanks for all the help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is way advanced stuff for my level so I'm just gonna watch all this for a while. I know and love Belgian beers and learning about them is as fun as drinking them. Sometimes I order from the cask and those are simply magnificent. When you keep taking sips and staring at it and saying "wow". Learning about the techniques is amazing too. Reading about how they make Lambics is amazing.

Out of curiosity I searched for a recipe for replicating Dogfish 120. Wow. The work involved blew my mind. There's something about banging the thing daily with more fermentables.....hitting it with more yeast....adding hops to extents that we would think it's way way over the top. Talk about mad scientist. The work and ingredients and time involved can be very expenisive and one bad mistake and yer done. Even Dogfish themselves have made mistakes with this stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So here is what i came up with, it's similar to the recipe trollby posted, but i used some different hops in this one.

The Tripelnator
--------------
Brewer: Neadric
Style: Belgian Tripel
Batch: 2.25 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.098 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 30 IBU
Recipe Color: 4 SRM
Estimated FG: 1.024
Alcohol by Volume: 9.5%
Alcohol by Weight: 7.4%

Ingredients
-----------
Briess DME - Pilsen Light 4.00 lb, Extract, Extract
Candi Sugar, Clear (Belgian) 1.00 lb, Sugar, Other
CaraPils - [body, Head] 0.25 lb, Grain, Steeped

Hallertauer (Germany) 0.50 oz, Pellet, 20 minutes
Styrian Golding (Slovenia) 1.00 oz, Pellet, 40 minutes
Tettnanger (U.S.) 0.50 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes


Notes
-----
Recipe Notes:
Candi Sugar not going into initial brew. Feeding .5lb at day 6 and .5lb at day 12

Using high gravity trappist yeast

(yes it's a cheesy name)

Batch Notes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fee wrote:

This is way advanced stuff for my level so I'm just gonna watch all this for a while. I know and love Belgian beers and learning about them is as fun as drinking them. Sometimes I order from the cask and those are simply magnificent. When you keep taking sips and staring at it and saying "wow". Learning about the techniques is amazing too. Reading about how they make Lambics is amazing.

Out of curiosity I searched for a recipe for replicating Dogfish 120. Wow. The work involved blew my mind. There's something about banging the thing daily with more fermentables.....hitting it with more yeast....adding hops to extents that we would think it's way way over the top. Talk about mad scientist. The work and ingredients and time involved can be very expenisive and one bad mistake and yer done. Even Dogfish themselves have made mistakes with this stuff.

Honestly it's most likely a little too advanced for me too, but i figure the best way to learn is to just dive right into it and hope my closet doesn't explode :woohoo:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Triplenator" should make good beer. Just be patient and give it a long time to condition before you start cracking them open. That's the only issue I see with this style as your first self developed recipe... the temptation... this is the kind of beer that you really need to ignore for 4-6 months, and should keep getting better for a year or two in the bottle, so hide some of them in a dark corner where you will forget about them until you do spring cleaning next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mashani wrote:

"Triplenator" should make good beer. Just be patient and give it a long time to condition before you start cracking them open. That's the only issue I see with this style as your first self developed recipe... the temptation... this is the kind of beer that you really need to ignore for 4-6 months, and should keep getting better for a year or two in the bottle, so hide some of them in a dark corner where you will forget about them until you do spring cleaning next year.


that'll be the hard part, but i think i can wait it out, i got plenty of other beer i'm planning so it should keep me busy :)


As far as the yeast, i'm guessing this is the high gravity yeast you're talking about

http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=65


I also found a white labs one that sounds interesting... i'm guessing this one would work as well.

http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/strains_wlp568.html

Edit: on second thought that whitelabs one doesn't look like it would work since it has saison strains mixed in

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

mashani wrote:

"Triplenator" should make good beer. Just be patient and give it a long time to condition before you start cracking them open. That's the only issue I see with this style as your first self developed recipe... the temptation... this is the kind of beer that you really need to ignore for 4-6 months, and should keep getting better for a year or two in the bottle, so hide some of them in a dark corner where you will forget about them until you do spring cleaning next year.

+100%

4 months min on this one.

Would be a nice Holiday beer for 2012 :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so i just put the LBK with this tripel in the closet to do it's thing.

the OG came out to be 1.070 or so, so a little off from the expected 1.098 but should be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neadric wrote:

so i just put the LBK with this tripel in the closet to do it's thing.

the OG came out to be 1.070 or so, so a little off from the expected 1.098 but should be fine.

If you did not add the sugar, then it's not part of your OG yet. So your effective OG will go up quite a bit if you are using 20% sugar and feeding it later.

EDIT: If this is the case, calculate the gravity for your amount of sugar all by itself in your volume, and then add it to your 1.070, and that's where you really are at. If you are using 1# of sugar, that is going to push your effective OG up by .20 or so in a 2.15 gallon batch. So your not that far off in that case...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

excellent thanks for the tip. Didn't even think of that, then it sounds like i'm in the right range.

Not even 24 hours into fermenting i'm already seeing a little overflow going on. hopefully it doesn't blow it's top :blink: lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So the little buggers slowed down a little bit, still got a good inch and a half of krausen on top, not spilling over anymore though. It was fun sitting next to the closet where it's fermenting (my computer room) and while i'm browsing hearing a "hssssss" coming from inside the closet lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so just did my first addition of sugar to this brew... noticed a whole bunch of stuff on the sides of the fermenter, i'm guessing from the krausen that was bubbling up. Should i get a paper towel soak it in sanitizer and clean that up, or at this point just leave it be, since it's been there a week =/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have fruit flies, clean it up, but you must not...

I clean it up ASAP with paper towel soaked in sanatizer, because I have fruit flies, and they would be all over it. Fruit flies don't make good beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea no fruit flies on this end, so ill leave it be. Im interested to see what happens now that i fed it sugar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So after adding the .5# i'm not noticing much activity in there, i was kind of expecting another rush of krausen, but there is just a thin film of it from what i can see from the outside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure it's fine, but what was your OG and what/how much yeast did you pitch?

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the OG was off a bit, i mention it somewhere earlier in the thread. I also used the Wyeast High Gravity yeast to make sure that the feeding will do the job.

The reason i was off on the OG originally was because i was adding the sugar as part of the boil in the recipe. If i didn't have that in the recipe the OG would have matched what i got.

cheeers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So i did a sample of this yesterday for the hydrometer, and the FG came in at 1.008 Pretty happy with the result so far, as long as the FG holds the same today, i'll be bottling it tomorrow (3/21) Fell a little behind as i was late by a couple days on my first sugar feeding, but it seemed to turn out just fine :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so resurrecting a zombie. So i popped this one open about mid October, so about 7 months conitioned. It was darker than the usual tripel than im used to, but the taste was out of this world. Very happy how this turned out, and in fact i think it turned out to be a tripel and a half, it was bordering on a quad in terms of the fullness of the beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

Sounds like a Winner!

Wheres the Picture?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the entire case was gone within several days >.> i opened it on my birthday hehe. i might have a picture or two, i'll see what i can dig up :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just did a tripel recipe out of BYO magazine, and am gonna keg it tomorrow. I honestly do not see myself waiting as long as you did to drink this. It attenuated all the way down to 1.010, and has a light golden color.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...