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Docniel

Sticky Wicket Recipe, how does this sound

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So I was wondering if anyone out there has tried this as a recipe and whether it was successful or not:

two cans Sticky Wicket Oatmeal stout

one can Creamy brown UME

??Hops??

One bag of booster

Any comments.

P.S.:
Not sure I downloaded QBrew right so I couldn't plug this in.

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I made this straight up.

Your recipe with the Creamy Brown UME should work great.
I would Not use booster nor any hops

I really liked the 2 can SWOMS HME as is. Should be very good with the CB UME.

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Docniel wrote:

No booster? Pardon my ignorance but why?

Because with close to 3.4# of malt you don't need it. Unless you really want to push into 7% abv territory for some reason (which will possibly require many months of conditioning to be at its best).

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All booster does is up the alcohol content by feeding raw sugars to the yeast and with the amount of malt you have in the 3 cans you do not need it. Coriander and/ or orange zest will help the brew,

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btomlin75 wrote:

All booster does is up the alcohol content by feeding raw sugars to the yeast and with the amount of malt you have in the 3 cans you do not need it. Coriander and/ or orange zest will help the brew,

How much of each you think, 3/4 teaspoon small or large Orange? I'll not use the booster for now, maybe someday. When I have some more batches under my belt.

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btomlin75 wrote:

All booster does is up the alcohol content by feeding raw sugars to the yeast and with the amount of malt you have in the 3 cans you do not need it. Coriander and/ or orange zest will help the brew,


:huh: Why would you add Coriander and/ or orange zest to a stout? I can see them in a Whit beer like Blue Moon clone but I can't imagine it in a stout like this!

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Louie,

How or what would you do to this recipe then. I'm open for any suggestions that looks/ sounds good.

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I was thinking the hops because, I was on the Guinness and Sam Adams websites last week looking at ingredients/ inspiration. Now I've got to wait another week for to bottle at least one or both of my tanks and I'll be set. Till then I'll look for any other advise from those who have more experience at beer than I. So keep it coming

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You could do a 30 minute hop boil to add some bitterness and earthyness. I think of the Sticky Wicket as pretty malty/sweet to start with, and the creamy brown is going to push it further into that territory. I'd probably boil up to 1/2oz of some fuggles or willamette for 30 minutes with the 1/2 can of the creamy brown in the water, then add the rest of the creamy brown and sticky wicket to that at flamout.

EDIT: IMHO, I wouldn't go near the corrieander or orange peel someone mentioned above... this beer just needs fuggley kind of love, it's not a belgian or wheat beer.

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See I was thinking US Goldings, Mt. Hood or US Saaz for like a 15 minute boil for 15 minutes. and not much like 1/2 oz. I was thinking Earthy woody.

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Docniel wrote:

Louie,

How or what would you do to this recipe then. I'm open for any suggestions that looks/ sounds good.

I really don't know, I'm new to this home brewing thing myself and trying to learn. I'm using Sticky Wicket in the Eye Opener Sumatra Stout recipe and thought about substituting the expresso for chocolate instead. But I was asking about the Coriander and orange out of curiosity and for clarification mostly. I just can't imagine how that would work in a stout.

:)

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mashani wrote:

You could do a 30 minute hop boil to add some bitterness and earthyness. I think of the Sticky Wicket as pretty malty/sweet to start with, and the creamy brown is going to push it further into that territory. I'd probably boil up to 1/2oz of some fuggles or willamette for 30 minutes with the 1/2 can of the creamy brown in the water, then add the rest of the creamy brown and sticky wicket to that at flamout.

EDIT: IMHO, I wouldn't go near the corrieander or orange peel someone mentioned above... this beer just needs fuggley kind of love, it's not a belgian or wheat beer.

This was kind of my point above. You don't really want to try to make a Stout taste like a wheat beer. I was hoping he person who posted that could explain his thoughts on this.

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I was hoping too. Didn't think the Coriander would go very well either.
Though if there a spice or herb out there for a stout, what would it be? Not that I'm gonna use it, but now I'm curious.

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The only things even remotely like a spice or herb I would personally consider adding to stout would be vanilla, chocolate, or cherries.

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Well I didn't think of those. How much of each?
Table Spoon for the Vanilla?
An oz. of Chocolate? Should this be powdered or baker's( I have both in the house)
And should these be added to the wort or during bottling or is it personal preference.
I understand the cherries, that would taste really good.

Keep them coming I'm adding these to my handy dandy notebook if you don't mind. Wouldn't be able to brew this till next week at the earliest.

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mashani wrote:

The only things even remotely like a spice or herb I would personally consider adding to stout would be vanilla, chocolate, or cherries.

+1

Raspberry Stout is good too.

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See I added a bit of cooking chocolate powder. Just a teaspoonful to add a bit of a chocolate flavor to the stout. I have it fermenting now. Tasted some a day ago when I did my gravity and it tasted great...definitely a hint of chocolate to it.

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What about Ligonberry preserves. We've got a 140z jar from Ikea that I don't think we're going to use for anything anytime soon.

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Ossian666 wrote:

Gotta be careful whats in them...some ingredients will only harm the beer.

To expand on that, any kind of preservative is not desirable because the preservatives are there in order to impede spoilage. Fermentation is a kind of spoilage; it's just that it's a controlled spoilage. But preservatives would stop that from happening.

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cinnamon? Blackberries? actual wood? molasses/brown sugar?

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Things I would consider trying with a stout. Whiskey too...

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So what types of preservatives are we talking about that one would have to be careful with when dealing with adjuncts like jams and jellies?

I was thinking about using wood also, but having never used wood when would you add it, during fermentation, the boil, or is this something that is personal preference as to when to use wood? Is it better to use chips or an actual cask? Or is it all personal preference.

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and one more question before I go to bed, This is to clarify, i should use an ale yeast correct, or does it matter as in the early days stout just meant strong.

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I agree that the two cans of Wicket HME and a can of Creamy Brown would be very good as is ... wouldn't add anything else.

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Docniel wrote:

So what types of preservatives are we talking about that one would have to be careful with when dealing with adjuncts like jams and jellies?

To be safe, if it's not just fruit and/or sugar, don't put it in your beer. If it has any other ingredient, especially anything that is "sodium" or "potassium" or "sulfite" then forget about it.

In regards to your other question, yes ale yeast because stouts are ales. The ale yeast character can be an important part of the flavor profile of a stout. I'm not a style weenie, I brew things out of style all the time, so sure I'll say you could make a "roasted barley lager" if you wanted to, and it probably will be good beer, but I'd not call it a stout.

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I have seen bags of wood chips sold at supply stores. I am going to use them at some point soon. I think I'll just add some right at the end of the boil, make sure to kill anything, and toss it right into the fermenter in a sack. It won't be as authentic as doing some kind of wood barrel aging (I love He'Brew's Lenny RIPA on Rye as well as Bourbon county stout)....but I think it will be noticable. Would I soak the wood in my fridge in bourbon for a while? maybe.

As far as fruit goes I would think the best way would be to get fresh fruit and then blend/boil it down before use. That way it's sterile but there are no preservatives.....I may be wrong however in terms of the cooking of it.

The Oregon cans of fruit are great, I've used them only for homemade ice cream so far but will be trying them soon for brewing.

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How long should it ferment for and should I transfer it to a secondary during the fermentation process?
Fee, I've seen them at MLHB store as well, and have been wondering how I would use them, would they have to be sanitized as well, or just thrown into the wort at the end of the boil like you said.

Man you guys are GREAT!!! :cheer:
I want to thank you every one for their thoughts and suggestions. I haven't quite figured out how I'm going to do the recipe just yet but this has given me a lot to think about and a lot of possible recipes that I just can't wait to try.

On another note about Stouts Porter's, etal. While searching online last night I was actually surprised to see that at one point in the 1800's or so it was possible to find a stout IPA (before the style of Stout was called a stout and it meant Strong) I would be interesting to find the right combination for that.

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I was going to use Safe Brew S-33 and leave it in the LBK for the full three weeks. If your thinking of a specific yeast that you would recommend?

Yeah Copper's ale yeast. I'll have look at that.

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Docniel wrote:

I was going to use Safe Brew S-33 and leave it in the LBK for the full three weeks. If your thinking of a specific yeast that you would recommend?

Yeah Copper's ale yeast. I'll have look at that.

S-33 is good....coopers is a step up from the yeast mr.beer uses...depending on the recipe

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Docniel wrote:

How long should it ferment for and should I transfer it to a secondary during the fermentation process?
Fee, I've seen them at MLHB store as well, and have been wondering how I would use them, would they have to be sanitized as well, or just thrown into the wort at the end of the boil like you said.

Man you guys are GREAT!!! :cheer:
I want to thank you every one for their thoughts and suggestions. I haven't quite figured out how I'm going to do the recipe just yet but this has given me a lot to think about and a lot of possible recipes that I just can't wait to try.

On another note about Stouts Porter's, etal. While searching online last night I was actually surprised to see that at one point in the 1800's or so it was possible to find a stout IPA (before the style of Stout was called a stout and it meant Strong) I would be interesting to find the right combination for that.

I do not know the procedure for using the wood chips but soon I will find out as I want to try it. I assume that they are clean in the bag.....but perhaps we should not assume that. I don't think I'd want to boil wood, but perhaps toss it in after the boil is done and the flame is off? Like I said, I will find out. Always talk to your MLHB person for tips too.

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Good on the Yeast, it gave my First Pitch Pilsner when I took a draw for Spec Grav a couple of days ago. And I'll ask MLHB folks, unless you get to them first. I will post the recipe a couple of days BEFORE I brew it. Thanks to everyone..... Till next week.

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Fee wrote:

Docniel wrote:

How long should it ferment for and should I transfer it to a secondary during the fermentation process?
Fee, I've seen them at MLHB store as well, and have been wondering how I would use them, would they have to be sanitized as well, or just thrown into the wort at the end of the boil like you said.

Man you guys are GREAT!!! :cheer:
I want to thank you every one for their thoughts and suggestions. I haven't quite figured out how I'm going to do the recipe just yet but this has given me a lot to think about and a lot of possible recipes that I just can't wait to try.

On another note about Stouts Porter's, etal. While searching online last night I was actually surprised to see that at one point in the 1800's or so it was possible to find a stout IPA (before the style of Stout was called a stout and it meant Strong) I would be interesting to find the right combination for that.

I do not know the procedure for using the wood chips but soon I will find out as I want to try it. I assume that they are clean in the bag.....but perhaps we should not assume that. I don't think I'd want to boil wood, but perhaps toss it in after the boil is done and the flame is off? Like I said, I will find out. Always talk to your MLHB person for tips too.

Soaking them in bourbon will kill what nasties might be on there. If you want to play it extra safe you could dip them in some one step before putting them in the bourbon, but it really wouldn't be needed.

If you want to boil them I would do so before you soak them in the bourbon. Also to get maximum bourbon flavor I would wait and add them after 1 week of fermentation. Just open the LBK real quick drop them in and seal it back up, I do additions like that all the time and have had zero problems with contamination. Good Luck guys and keep on posting the results!! :)

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OMG! just finished brewing this,and It smells and tastes GREAT!

Here's what I did:
Two cans of Sticky Wicket
One can of Creamy Brown UME
One Package of Booster 9 I know, but i have a lot to and hate wasting stuff)
one Teaspoon-ish of Almond extract.
Safebrew T-58
Dry hopped 1/2 oz of U.S. Goldings
I don't have Bourbon in the house right now, but I plan on adding Oak Chips next week. The yeast has started working and My brew Cabinet smells GREAT!

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Now that it's been sitting for a couple of days, i got my package from Mr. Beer with the stick-on Thermometers in it and when I went to put it on the LBK, I noticed that there was not much action going on, not a whole lot of anything really in the way of telling me there is fermentation going on, The temp gauge is reading around 66F. Should I have used a different yeast strain, do I need to move it, or just leave it alone. 66 is right in the middle of the temp range.

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My first batch of straight-up SWOS (premium refill) is out of the keg since Jan 27. Here's the scoop:

Great flavor, medium carbonation. 1 tsp cane sugar for priming. PET 16oz bottles are rock hard and some have the bottom pushed out slightly (they stand up crooked) Almost black in color and cleared up nicely. Nice after-taste. Body is okay, but where it falls down for me is that it has none of that thick, silky texture going across the tongue that I so like in a stout.

This aspect I would like to improve. Is the Shillelagh Stout a better choice? Should I add some adjunct? Or some UME like creamy brown?

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Docniel wrote:

Now that it's been sitting for a couple of days, i got my package from Mr. Beer with the stick-on Thermometers in it and when I went to put it on the LBK, I noticed that there was not much action going on, not a whole lot of anything really in the way of telling me there is fermentation going on, The temp gauge is reading around 66F. Should I have used a different yeast strain, do I need to move it, or just leave it alone. 66 is right in the middle of the temp range.

My stout, which was similar in recipe to yours, went nuts (about one and half to two inches of krausen) for the first two days and hasn't done much since. I know things are still happening, but the activity has certainly died down. I brewed on 02.26 and I'm planning a hydro reading this weekend to see if its ready to bottle.

I think your temps are fine and you should just leave it alone for two weeks. I know its like worrying about one of your kids, but try not to panic! :S

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@manosteel: Thanks! You have it about worrying like it's the kids too!
@ piscator: Thanks for the info on yours too! This was my first recipe for a Stout, so I'm not sure yet if the Booster or the Creamy brown i added will do that, but that's what I'm hoping it will do. That and that ongoing head found in Guiness.
I'll keep everyone posted in about a month after bottling.

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Just did. Thanks for the Heads up, I'll let you know tonight for sure.

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So I feel a little better about this recipe, finally got a chance to look at it with a flashlight and there was a lot of Krausen above the current level of the fermentation. Thanks again manosteel.

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:stout:
I finally got to bottle it today, nice and mellow F.G. 1.024. And had that nice warming feeling in the belly after drinking the hydrometer sample. There wasn't a whole lot of krausen, but there definitely was a lot of trubb!

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Congrats Doc...glad it worked out! If I have just one more piece of advice, its wait at least 6 weeks before trying this one. For most beers, I like to try them pretty early...as early as two weeks...just to get a feel for them. I did just that with my Shameless Oatmeal Stout and was horribly disappointed in it. I couldn't drink it!

I've been told that stouts can be 3-6 months before their prime, but give one a shot at 6 weeks in the bottle, then every couple of weeks after that, until you find that sweet spot.

Enjoy!

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Thanks Brother that is good advise. Just got to keep the :stout: Loving wife out of it for that long. If i can't, I'll come home from work to this: :drinking: LOL

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I did this...but I replaced the Creamy Brown UME with a 3rd can of Oatmeal Stout.

I believe I bottled that about a week ago or so and it had a wonderful creamy chocolate taste to it. You'll do just fine with putting the Creamy Brown in there. That ought to be really good.

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"Christ872" post=251946 said:

I did this...but I replaced the Creamy Brown UME with a 3rd can of Oatmeal Stout.

I believe I bottled that about a week ago or so and it had a wonderful creamy chocolate taste to it. You'll do just fine with putting the Creamy Brown in there. That ought to be really good.

Sounds like that should be my next Stout creation, a nice creamy chocolaty stout.

For each of my recipes, how much Carapils should I use, what if anything would that do to ABV, taste and color I understand are neutral since this is my first time using it.

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"Docniel" post=251948 said:

Sounds like that should be my next Stout creation, a nice creamy chocolaty stout.

For each of my recipes, how much Carapils should I use, what if anything would that do to ABV, taste and color I understand are neutral since this is my first time using it.

I didn't see you list any CaraPils...so I'm guessing that you're talking about adding this to any of your recipes. On a 2-to-2.3 gallon batch I think you'd be safe with going for about 4-to-6 oz of CaraPils for head and a little body.

CaraPils is roughly about 2 (maybe 3) Lovibond. At a max of 6 oz, you're not really adding but maybe 0.3-or-0.4 to the ABV.


=======

Hypothetically, on a 2.3 gallon batch

1 Lb 2 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 Lb 2 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 Lb 2 oz Creamy Brown UME
= 19 SRM, 1.050 OG, 5.1% ABV

if you add 6 oz of CaraPils
1 Lb 2 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 Lb 2 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 Lb 2 oz Creamy Brown UME
6 oz CaraPils
= 19 SRM, 1.055 OG, 5.5% ABV

Just be careful - you may not was a huge head on a stout. So, maybe 4 oz would be fine. Seems like a lot of extra work with only 4-to-6 oz of grains if everything else is extract.

There's not really going to be anything super-noticeable in regard to "taste" specifically from the CaraPils...but it may do a little in regard to strengthen the thickness/body.

==============

You asked about CaraPils in all 4 of your other batches. As I noted...I wouldn't use more than - say - 6 oz in each. And again, if you want a nice, full head...go for it. But it seems like a lot of work if that's the only grain going into it. Everything else looks to be extracts. I'm not saying don't do it. But just consider the time and effort of doing it.

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"Christ872" post=251964 said:

"Docniel" post=251948 said:

Sounds like that should be my next Stout creation, a nice creamy chocolaty stout.

For each of my recipes, how much Carapils should I use, what if anything would that do to ABV, taste and color I understand are neutral since this is my first time using it.

I didn't see you list any CaraPils...so I'm guessing that you're talking about adding this to any of your recipes. On a 2-to-2.3 gallon batch I think you'd be safe with going for about 4-to-6 oz of CaraPils for head and a little body.

CaraPils is roughly about 2 (maybe 3) Lovibond. At a max of 6 oz, you're not really adding but maybe 0.3-or-0.4 to the ABV.


=======

Hypothetically, on a 2.3 gallon batch

1 Lb 2 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 Lb 2 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 Lb 2 oz Creamy Brown UME
= 19 SRM, 1.050 OG, 5.1% ABV

if you add 6 oz of CaraPils
1 Lb 2 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 Lb 2 oz Oatmeal Stout
1 Lb 2 oz Creamy Brown UME
6 oz CaraPils
= 19 SRM, 1.055 OG, 5.5% ABV

Just be careful - you may not was a huge head on a stout. So, maybe 4 oz would be fine. Seems like a lot of extra work with only 4-to-6 oz of grains if everything else is extract.

There's not really going to be anything super-noticeable in regard to "taste" specifically from the CaraPils...but it may do a little in regard to strengthen the thickness/body.

==============

You asked about CaraPils in all 4 of your other batches. As I noted...I wouldn't use more than - say - 6 oz in each. And again, if you want a nice, full head...go for it. But it seems like a lot of work if that's the only grain going into it. Everything else looks to be extracts. I'm not saying don't do it. But just consider the time and effort of doing it.


:blush: Cross post from my other thread, got carried away and well....
Oh hw did you like the 1776 Ale??

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Tons of feedback on this thread and i just got SWOS in a refill pack. Ive decided on:

No carapils with this
2 cans SWOS
0.5# of Light/Amber DME
1 tsp. of Dominican Vanilla extract
Cammando 1/2 oz. willamette hops with dme for 10 minute boil
11.5 g of S-33 yeast
Add wood chips(cedar and firwood soaked in a few oz. of black velvet) at 10 day fermentation and finish fermentation for another 11 days.
16 oz. bottle prime with 3/4 tsp. of priming sugar
Carb/Condition for 4-5 months
Shoot G-2 11 point trophy buck that I have figured out in archery season
come home and HAHB stout/several if I choose

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Sounds like a nice smooth Stout! I bottled mine 10 days ago, Carbonation is settling in nicely, I hope to be able to keep all the bottles conditioning till at least mid May, here's to hoping. :unsure:

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Well we couldn't resist and tried a bottle of the stout tonight, the head wasn't quite there but the carbonation and flavor was! I made a very tasty stout with this recipe :stout: Give it a couple of more weeks and it will be even better

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Congrats Doc! You did better than I did. I only got to two weeks in the bottle before I tried mine and it was terrible! I just opened another bottle a couple of nights ago...almost 6 weeks in the bottle...and it was MUCH better. I think its just the nature of the beast with stouts. They will just be at their best after 3 or 4 months.

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Manosteel,
I'll agree with that, at four weeks it was good, hoping at six weeks it will be better. If I remember to catch the next bottle on camera, I'll post a picture. Or if ya beat me to it your more than welcome to post.

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