Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Guest System Admin

Super Dumb Question

Recommended Posts

Guest System Admin

I just finished bottling my second batch. I'm using granulated sugar. After I sanitize the bottles and add the sugar, the sugar seems to stick to the bottom of the bottles when I add the beer. I don't want to shake them a whole lot, but I'm concerned about the sugar not dissolving into the beer. Is the yeast gonna find that sugar stuck to the bottom and utilize it, or should I be concerned.

I eventually figure I'll go to batch priming, but for now, I just want to make sure I'm getting this bottle priming right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

The yeasties will find the sugar. It will be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same issue with my first batch. What I did on batch two was just fill each bottle about 1/3 of the way, then drop the sugar in - with a funnel. This helps significantly as the batch I bottled last week does not have any sugar sitting in the bottom.

I also did about six bottles at a time. I figured this way I was getting the bottles filled much faster that way as well. These were all in glass bottles as well.

Hope that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I currently only bottle prime and I don't have any issues just filling and letting them condition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm using granulated sugar. After I sanitize the bottles and add the sugar, the sugar seems to stick to the bottom of the bottles when I add the beer. I don't want to shake them a whole lot, but I'm concerned about the sugar not dissolving into the beer. Is the yeast gonna find that sugar stuck to the bottom and utilize it, or should I be concerned.

This was a great question, because I just bottled this AM for the first time and had the same situation. I figured the yeast would take care of the undissolved sugar, but I'm glad you asked the question. :cheer:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fill about an inch up from the bottom and gently swirl the beer to dissolve the sugar, than I fill the rest of the way up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The instructions say you may have to invert the bottles several times to get the sugar dissolved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I place them in a paint shaker for about 10 minutes...er...kidding.

:P

I actually thought it was a good question that I've wondered myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THe sugar at the bottom is not the problem. They even sell carb drops that essently look like a cough drop. THese are hard solid pieces of sugar that you just drop in, and somehow these do fine, so granulated sugar will also do just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

texasbrewer0069 wrote:

Do not worry about it the yeast will find all the sugar...
its there only food source...

Yep. No worries, leave it be. Earlier books will tell you to gently invert the bottles several times once they're filled. I'd be very cautious about swirling or mixing until the bottle is completely filled; it is just too easy to oxygenate your beer at this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oly wrote:

texasbrewer0069 wrote:

Do not worry about it the yeast will find all the sugar...
its there only food source...

Yep. No worries, leave it be. Earlier books will tell you to gently invert the bottles several times once they're filled. I'd be very cautious about swirling or mixing until the bottle is completely filled; it is just too easy to oxygenate your beer at this point.

Uh oh. I inverted both batches several times. I'm still at least 2 weeks away from the 1st batch (WCPA) and at least 3 weeks from the 2nd batch(Linebacker Doppelbock).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uh oh. I inverted both batches several times. I'm still at least 2 weeks away from the 1st batch (WCPA) and at least 3 weeks from the 2nd batch(Linebacker Doppelbock).

Nothing to worry about. Sit back, relax (for two weeks)and have a home brew then! We are in the same boat. :chug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thread. Does anyone else feel the need to occasionally take a bottle that's conditioning and invert it a couple of time? Does it even matter? Could it hurt the beer? Seems like even doing this a few times over a couple of weeks and still stuff settles right back down to the bottom....although over time that's probably not sugar any more but yeast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fee wrote:

Great thread. Does anyone else feel the need to occasionally take a bottle that's conditioning and invert it a couple of time? Does it even matter? Could it hurt the beer? Seems like even doing this a few times over a couple of weeks and still stuff settles right back down to the bottom....although over time that's probably not sugar any more but yeast.

HALT. PUT THE BEER DOWN AND STEP AWAY FROM THE SHELF.

A number of things happen when you're carbing and conditioning. First, the yeast eat the priming sugar and conver it to CO2 (and a tiny amount of alcohol). Once they finish that, they start going after various other compounds, doing general cleanup, etc.

There are also chemical changes occurring. And physical changes, as well. One of the primary physical changes that happens is that various solids drop out of suspension and settle on the bottom. As you condition longer, the sediment on the bottom has a chance to compact.

If you invert the bottle, you stir this all up, put things back into suspension and never give the sediment a chance to compact.

By the time I pour my beer, it is very clear and I can generally pour the whole thing without getting any trub in the glass at all. If you keep inverting the bottle, you'll never get to that point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear you but aren't you implying that re-suspending it gets more work done? So the inverting may extend this time but provided it's given extra time what happens here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put granulated sugar into the bottle and add the beer. Then I cap it, invert it a few times and put it away for 3 weeks. Do not invert or disturb them during carb/conditioning. Put them in the fridge for another week before drinking and you'll have a beer worth fighting your brother-in-law for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fee wrote:

I hear you but aren't you implying that re-suspending it gets more work done?

No. If you inferred that, you were mistaken.


So the inverting may extend this time but provided it's given extra time what happens here?

If you condition a beer longer, it will generally improve (up to a point). But that is because you're conditioning it longer, not because you're inverting it. When you invert it, you undo some of the benefit of the conditioning that has gone before, so additional conditioning time is needed to get back to where you were when you inverted it.

If you keep inverting your beers for the first couple of months, your beers at 5-6 months are going to be where mine are at about 4 months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent. I'm one of those guys that just keeps asking "why" and that pretty much did it. I will leave the dang bottles alone. I still reserve the right to open the box and say hello.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bottle primed my first batch of Voodoo Magic and then switched to batch priming, but...

I laid the filled bottles on their sides and slowly rolled them back and forth on the counter until the sugar was dissolved. No worries with aeration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never batch primed. I use a tsp of granulated sugar for each 12oz bottle, not the prescribed 3/4 tsp ... rarely does it over carb, and never had a bottle bomb.

After capping, I invert the bottle once and then just put it in sixer.

But, I agree with those on here who say even that one invert is not necessary. The sugar will disolve, dissapate and the yeasts will have their feast.

BTW, it was not a "dumb" question. The borg is here for stuff like this. Feel free to ask ................

I find that most parts of beer making are not that precise, not that critical (except sanitizing ... don't let your guard down) ... but that's me. I've broken just about every rule there is at one time or another, and the only bad batch I ever got was my first DME that was melt down from not enough water. Two years ago, never forget it .. heh heh. So, asking questions is not dumb, it is smart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...