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dizzione

My first time.

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I am a 31 year old from Pittsburgh PA. I have had a craft beer love for 2 years now started with a little Dogfish Head 90 min IPA. I favor strong ABV beers and I have started drinking Barley Wine (Flying Dog's Horn Dog) recently. I want to brew my own because of the love of the beer and the desire to make my own. I started my first batch today. I am anxious to see what you guys think. This is my first time brewing beer. here is my recipe.

1 can Classic American Blonde Ale HME
1 package Booster
1 package Brewers yeast (under HME lid)
1 can of Oregon Dark Sweet Cherries in Heavy Syrup

I followed the basic instructions to put the beer together. Except I pureed the cherries and syrup in a blender and added the puree to the keg water before the wort. I realize now that I would have liked to add some sugar or honey. I think that it is too late now since I have already pitched the yeast. i'm good with this and I'm using this as a learning experiance. What do you think it will turn out like?

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It should be a fine beer. Not the hoppy, high ABV beer you like, but still a satisfying one.

As far as adding honey or sugar, you're better off not having done that. It will increase the ABV%, definitely, but it will also result in a thin, cidery beer that requires more conditioning time to become enjoyable.

Good for you for wanting to brew your own beer. Good for you for taking the first step. Now, continue to be good and use your first four or five batches to learn the basics. Don't get ahead of yourself by adding a lot of stuff or trying to duplicate your favorite craft brew. If you're in this for the long haul, you've got plenty of time, and take it from me, you'll progress faster if you take it slow right now. That sounds like a contradiction, but it's not.

You're 31. I'm 53, and started brewing just two years ago, sticking with the basic Mr. Beer kits. Now, I'm formulating my own all-grain recipes and have a lot of confidence and know-how, and I'm brewing some excellent beers.

Good luck, and brew strong.

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Guest System Admin

Welcome aboard!

Give it 2-3 weeks at 66-70*F and bottle. Leave in bottle for 4 weeks, then taste

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I love Dogfish Head and it's impossible to get here in the New Orleans area. A friend in Florida tried a few recipes (both all grain and extract/grain) and said he couldn't come close. He enjoyed what he made but it was obviously not good enough for him to call it a clone.

Once you get your feet wet, you can make some very nice and hoppy beers with just a few more minutes of your time.

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Guest System Admin

It'll be your first of many, give it some time!

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FrozenInTime wrote:

Welcome to the Forum!

Good reading: http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=8&id=65050

Looks to me like your adjuncts are a little high.

+1
That's a lot of sugar for the amount of malt in your brew. You would be a lot better to add more malt extract. As long as you are very careful with your sanitation, you can do so without harm. Mix it with a couple cups to a quart of boiling water to make it easier to work with, just as if you were making a new batch. Cool it to whatever temperature your main wort is fermenting at before you add it to the existing wort so that it doesn't harm the yeast. Swirling your covered pot gently in an ice bath will cool it quickly. Once the temperature is below 76*F, it is safe to aerate it if you choose. Otherwise, you can just dump it in without worrying about hurting the main beer, since the yeast in your fermentor is still in the growth phase, and likes oxygen at this point. In fact, if the beer has just started, it can be safely aerated again. If the beer has fermented for more than a day or so, add gently and don't aerate.

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Guest System Admin

Another warm welcome to you, Dizz. We have something in common. You're 31 and I wish I was 31.

Good luck with your brewing. Hope to hear a lot more from you.

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Ok so I never expected the waiting to be so very hard.
I realized that I made a mistake by using distilled water. I also don't think I aerated the mix well after watching videos on youtube. I won't. Make those mistakes again.

I have a question about temperature. I had the fermenter keg in my basement which I assumed was around 70 degrees on the regular but I didn't have any thermometer. I ordered more supplies, another keg and liquid crystal thermometers. When I took the temp of my keg I found it to be 65 degrees. The fermenter keg had stopped bubbling so I took a very small sample yesterday. It was very cloudy, flat, not sweet, and had a strong alcohol smell. Since it was flat and unsweet I bottled a test bottle using 2 1/4 tsp cane sugar. I also moved the keg to a spare bedroom and it is now sitting at 70 degrees.

My question is where is better for the beer to be @ 62-65 degrees in my basement or @ 70-78 degrees in my spare bedroom? Also I recived a suggestion to add more malt which I now have but is it too late to add it?

I have also started my second batch yesterday a variation of the "King's Nectar" recipe I. Call "Bacchus Ale"
1 can High Country Canadian Draft HME
1 can Pale Export UME
4oz Willamette Pellet Hops
1 cup honey
3 1/2 cup Concord Grape Juice
1 pkg American Ale Liquid yeast
*I forgot to sanitise the hop sack.*

I know the concord grape juice sounds strange but I feel good about it.

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dizzione wrote:

Ok so I never expected the waiting to be so very hard.
I realized that I made a mistake by using distilled water. I also don't think I aerated the mix well after watching videos on youtube. I won't. Make those mistakes again.

I have a question about temperature. I had the fermenter keg in my basement which I assumed was around 70 degrees on the regular but I didn't have any thermometer. I ordered more supplies, another keg and liquid crystal thermometers. When I took the temp of my keg I found it to be 65 degrees. The fermenter keg had stopped bubbling so I took a very small sample yesterday. It was very cloudy, flat, not sweet, and had a strong alcohol smell. Since it was flat and unsweet I bottled a test bottle using 2 1/4 tsp cane sugar. I also moved the keg to a spare bedroom and it is now sitting at 70 degrees.

My question is where is better for the beer to be @ 62-65 degrees in my basement or @ 70-78 degrees in my spare bedroom? Also I recived a suggestion to add more malt which I now have but is it too late to add it?

I have also started my second batch yesterday a variation of the "King's Nectar" recipe I. Call "Bacchus Ale"
1 can High Country Canadian Draft HME
1 can Pale Export UME
4oz Willamette Pellet Hops
1 cup honey
3 1/2 cup Concord Grape Juice
1 pkg American Ale Liquid yeast
*I forgot to sanitise the hop sack.*

I know the concord grape juice sounds strange but I feel good about it.


Using distilled water is not a problem with extracts, so you're fine there. I would brew in the 60s rather than the 70s.

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Welcome and goodluck, man. And don't get discouraged if something doesn't turn out quite right. Read, read and read some more. I've never been steered in the wrong direction here. It's always good to see another brewer from Pittsburgh, too. B)

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