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sickfish

Imp Pilsner pitch temp

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I have just brewed imp Pilsner. what temp should I throw the yeast
in i followed the instuction exactly.it has a check mark on the stick on temp gauge. I can get a more accurate reading if I have to.

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sickfish wrote:

I have just brewed imp Pilsner. what temp should I throw the yeast
in i followed the instuction exactly.it has a check mark on the stick on temp gauge. I can get a more accurate reading if I have to.

I haven't brewed a lager yet, but I'm thinking closer to 59-60 degrees would be best for a lager yeast. Does the yeast contain any pitching instructions? I think Trollby pitched his at about 65, then moved to a cooler environment.

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I have a elect. temp gauge taped to the side it is at 72 right now.
I will be able to ferment at 55 - 61 for the next month.

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I pitched my yeast at 68, left if for 24 hours then popped it in a mini fridge at 48-50.
As Trollby reported earlier, after a few days I could smell a sulphor like smell though it appears to be lessening with each day.

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Guest System Admin

Fermentis states to pitch their lager yeast (S-23 and W-34/70) at 68*F

With the IMP Pilsner yeast you want to keep it below 60*F (optimal temp is 53.6*F per Fermentis) I like mine 48-50*F.

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Trollby to the rescue! I later stumbled upon this:

Yest Review SafLager W-34/70 Dry

When pitching lager yeasts, there are two methods by which to do it, pitching warm or pitching cold. A warm pitch will take place at a temperature of 65-70F, then the temperature is slowly lowered to the ideal fermentation temperature of 48-59F. This is done by some brewers to accelerate the start of the fermentation and lessen the lag time, it will also require a slightly lower pitching rate for these reasons. There are concerns however of off flavors being produced from the limited time at warm temperatures, but the yeast can clean this up with a diacetyl rest after primary fermentation.

Pitching cold is simply the process of pitching yeast at fermentation temperatures ranging from 48-59F. This will result in a slightly longer lag time and require a healthier yeast count to get fermentation started in a timely manner. This is preferred however by many lager brewers to avoid any possibility of off flavors that can be created during a warm pitch.

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I pitch mine at 68*F and move to the basement that is running 62-64*F right now so by the next morning (18-24 hours) the temp is around 64*F and is fermenting away good them move to 48*F cooler.

Really took off, So far I have done this 3 times and seems to get it going so much better than the old way I did it.

Pitch at 64*F right to cooler at 48*F, this seem to take 3-4 days before the fermentation was noticeable and took 3 weeks to get OG with-out D-Rest. With the fast start it looks like done in 2 weeks ready for D-rest.

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I aerate my wort pitch my lager yeast and aerate the wort some more when the wort is between 60-65F. But then I immediately put the fermentors inside my fermentation chamber to cool them down quickly to 52-56F where they show visible signs of krausen within the first 10-12 hours.


I pitch twice as much lager yeast as I would for the same volume of beer using an ale yeast. Even at these cooler temperatures the yeast will produce heat within the fermenting beer which is offset by the colder temperatures of the fermentation chamber.

I'm actually looking forward to tomorrow and bottling and kegging up the Oktoberfest/Marzen lager beer I brewed a few months ago.

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Screwy Brewer wrote:

I aerate my wort pitch my lager yeast and aerate the wort some more when the wort is between 60-65F. But then I immediately put the fermentors inside my fermentation chamber to cool them down quickly to 52-56F where they show visible signs of krausen within the first 10-12 hours.


I pitch twice as much lager yeast as I would for the same volume of beer using an ale yeast. Even at these cooler temperatures the yeast will produce heat within the fermenting beer which is offset by the colder temperatures of the fermentation chamber.

I'm actually looking forward to tomorrow and bottling and kegging up the Oktoberfest/Marzen lager beer I brewed a few months ago.

How do you keep your fermentation chamber cooler than the surrounding environment? Do you put ice in it somewhere?

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Screwy made his chill box and had a nice tutorial on it I just can not find the link.

It has a door on top h adds frozen water bottles too

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Need a recomendationm on how much yeast to pitch for a First Pitch Pilsner. When I bought the MB kit I also ordered a package, 11.5 grams, of Saflager W34/70 yeast. I assume that this is enough for a 5 gallion batch and that I should use half the yeast. Would that be correct?

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mrblase wrote:

Need a recomendationm on how much yeast to pitch for a First Pitch Pilsner. When I bought the MB kit I also ordered a package, 11.5 grams, of Saflager W34/70 yeast. I assume that this is enough for a 5 gallion batch and that I should use half the yeast. Would that be correct?

You could probably use half of the packet, but it certainly wouldn't hurt to pitch the whole thing.

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