Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Guest System Admin

Can I use S-04 yeast for everything?

Recommended Posts

Guest System Admin

Are there any brews where using S-04 yeast would be a BAD idea?
I got it for the temperature range, and because I like the English Ales, don't like Pilsners much. Can I use S-04 in IPAs, Bocks, Martzen (sp?). Is there any brew where the S-04 might give the wrong flavors?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

If you like English style try Danstar Windsor ale yeast, I like better than S-04

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if it would be the best choice for those styles, but it would certainly work and if you like it, that's more important than being completely true to style.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

I will try those other yeasts when I can, but I have S-04 now. And I want to brew now, so I'm trying to decided what to make with the ingredients I have. I've got the ingredients for a Pale ale and also a IPA. I'm not overly concerned about being true to style. So unless someone says don't use it, I'll go ahead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a fan of S-04 and Notty if I'm using a dry yeast. There are IPAs made with English ale yeast as well as American ale yeast. Yazoo, for instance, uses English ale yeast for all of their brews besides their lagers and hefe (including their IPA and pale). What you lose by using the same yeast for all beers, however, is the variety of flavors (or lack of flavors) that the different yeasts impart. An English ale yeast is more likely to impart some fruity flavors than an American ale yeast, which usually is more neutral in its flavor. That's my experience... YMMV...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

S-04 is a good all around yeast if you ferment on the cool side. I believe it's the same yeasts as the more malty/less attenuative whitbread strain (Wyeast 1099 is the same yeast in liquid form I think). As long as you do not ferment it warm, it's nowhere near as "englishy" as many english ale yeasts, so you can really get away with using it in just about anything. If you ferment it warm it will get fruity though, which would detract from an american style IPA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

The fermenting room stays at 64 or 65 degrees F most of the time and can briefly hit 61 at night. Its the most stable room. My first batch of Mr Beer used the fromunda yeast, then I learned that the LBK was getting down to 62 at night and up to 77 in the day. So I started checking all the closets and rooms in the house around the clock, and found this room to be the best and most stable. That's when I bought a lot of the S-04.
Someday I will get a refrigerator and disable the cooling unit and be able to keep it at 68 (or whatever temp I choose).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scott838383 wrote:

The fermenting room stays at 64 or 65 degrees F most of the time and can briefly hit 61 at night. Its the most stable room. My first batch of Mr Beer used the fromunda yeast, then I learned that the LBK was getting down to 62 at night and up to 77 in the day. So I started checking all the closets and rooms in the house around the clock, and found this room to be the best and most stable. That's when I bought a lot of the S-04.
Someday I will get a refrigerator and disable the cooling unit and be able to keep it at 68 (or whatever temp I choose).


@Scott.... Can you elaborate or link to disabling a cooling unit on an old fridge to keep it at a temp?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scott838383 wrote:

The fermenting room stays at 64 or 65 degrees F most of the time and can briefly hit 61 at night. Its the most stable room. My first batch of Mr Beer used the fromunda yeast, then I learned that the LBK was getting down to 62 at night and up to 77 in the day. So I started checking all the closets and rooms in the house around the clock, and found this room to be the best and most stable. That's when I bought a lot of the S-04.
Someday I will get a refrigerator and disable the cooling unit and be able to keep it at 68 (or whatever temp I choose).

64 is fine.

If you're fermenting in the low to mid 60s, S-04 won't give a lot of English ale flavors. you could switch to US-05 or Nottingham and probably not notice the difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brewish wrote:

Scott838383 wrote:

The fermenting room stays at 64 or 65 degrees F most of the time and can briefly hit 61 at night. Its the most stable room. My first batch of Mr Beer used the fromunda yeast, then I learned that the LBK was getting down to 62 at night and up to 77 in the day. So I started checking all the closets and rooms in the house around the clock, and found this room to be the best and most stable. That's when I bought a lot of the S-04.
Someday I will get a refrigerator and disable the cooling unit and be able to keep it at 68 (or whatever temp I choose).


@Scott.... Can you elaborate or link to disabling a cooling unit on an old fridge to keep it at a temp?

I wouldn't think you'd want to disable the cooling unit. Rather, you'd want to connect a Johnson controller, which can be set to a certain temperature and act as a thermostat/regulator to keep the temperature constant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

As far as the old refrigerator, it all depends on the room conditions. I've heard of several people using old fridges. It has lots of insulation to help keep a stable temp. Some people wanted 68 to 72 F. and they put a ceramic heater in the light bulb socket, otherwise it ran about 50F. Other people may want to use the refrigeration and turn it to 50 or even 45 (Lagering (sp?)). I want to make ales so I will ferment warm and condition warm.
But whether or not you cut off the refrigeration capabilities of the fridge is a case-by-case situation. Also depends on Summer vs. Winter, inside vs. back porch, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

In fact, I may be able to get an old fridge for free, if it doesn't work anymore. No one would expect you to buy their fridge from them if it quit working. In the summer, it might make a perfect place for 67-68 degrees F. Crack the door if you had to in the middle of the day. Keep it closed the rest of the time since my house cools off at night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

By the way, when I make an English ale, and I want the S-04 to add its English ale flavors to the brew, what would be the best temperature to ferment at then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

Sorry. On that last question the text got screwed up.

I'm asking this: I've got an English Ale fermenting. What temp. is best for the S-04 yeast that I used in it? Pitched at 60F by the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say for everything, I'd lean to 05 for that, but I've been using 04 alot. Seems good on my reds and other ales of English style, didn't like it in the doppelbock though, wrong yeast choice on my part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you brew close to 60, it'll ferment pretty cleanly. To get the esters you probably want in the English ale, you probably want to ferment closer to 70.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeast is to beer what location is to wine. A good part of your overall flavor profile comes from the type of yeast that you use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always meant to do a double batch SMaSH, and use S05 in one fermenter, and S04 in the other. Mebbe I'll do that next.

On another note, I did that side by side using S05 in one, and the cheapest bakers yeast from the super market. Both fermented about the same. The bakers yeast taste very bready, but I finished drinking the batch, and had not a 'yech' moment. I should do a side by side of that vs. windsor or S04 ... would give a better comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My bet is the Windsor would be more similar to the bread yeast vs. S-04. I think Muntons GOLD (not standard) yeast would be more similar as well. Both are more spicy and bready vs. fruity like Coopers yeast or warm fermented S-04.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...