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Brew-tality

Possible problem...

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Got 2 batches in bottles right now. Whispering wheat and Canadian draft. Dry hopped each with 1 oz cascade for one and centennial for the other. Bottled it up on the 25th. 2 days later the bottles were rock solid. I tried to relieve some pressure, and the bottle just sprayed everywhere.

What I did to remedy the overflowing was put the bottles in the fridge to slow the yeast, then relieved pressure and put back in the cupboard for warm conditioning.

did I ruin my beer??? I let both batches ferment for 2 weeks and used 4 grams of yeast in each fermenter. Bottle primed same as I did with my first batch. something just seems to have gone wrong...

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Just the standard recipes? What temp did you ferment at? Or could you have possibly mismeasured your priming sugar? I've had trub bottles blow their top when I tried opening them.

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they were the standard recipes, but I steeped grains in each and dry hopped them as well. They fermented at right around 66-68 degrees. And I put 2 scoops of sugar into each bottle using the Mr Beer cylinder sugar measure. Also, i use the 1 liter PET bottles. what im mainly wondering is, did the act of chilling the beer, then re-conditioning it do any harm???

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Chilling and reconditioning (putting them back in the cool area for carbinating and conditioning) doesn't do any harm......yeasties can be woken back up....lol

Overall I think you over analyzed the situation......with removing pressure.....trust your method of madness....lol

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Astrobeerman wrote:

Chilling and reconditioning (putting them back in the cool area for carbinating and conditioning) doesn't do any harm......yeasties can be woken back up....lol

Overall I think you over analyzed the situation......with removing pressure.....trust your method of madness....lol

Haha, thanks astro. I figured I was just overthinking the whole thing. thanks for the reassurance...

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My first batch of bottles were pretty hard after a couple of days too. It's funny though, unlike most people here I was psyched! I just kept thinking how great it was that it was carbonating and didn't really worry about the pressure. It did end up a little over carbonated but was nothing awful. I just let it sit out a bit before drinking

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Brew-tality said:
they were the standard recipes, but I steeped grains in each and dry hopped them as well. They fermented at right around 66-68 degrees. And I put 2 scoops of sugar into each bottle using the Mr Beer cylinder sugar measure. Also, i use the 1 liter PET bottles. what im mainly wondering is, did the act of chilling the beer, then re-conditioning it do any harm???

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Okay, I'm seeing two things here:

One is that the slightly lower temps of 66-68 could require a little more time. You said you fermented for two weeks? Maybe it still had a little unfermented sugar left that is still fermenting in the bottle.

Second, are you saying that you used TWO cylinders of the sugar measure for each liter bottle? I'm thinking one cylinder is the proper amount, so you may just have doubled the necessary priming sugar.

If one of these situations is in play, or God forbid both are simultaneously at play, that would pretty much explain the super-charged carbonation.

Just an observation. I could be reading all this wrong.

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the question is what size, how many teaspoons? This is another reason why I batch prime and use weight measures much more accurate.

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It's funny how we pick up soda and seltzer at the store all the time and think nothing of these pressurized, rock-hard bottles. Then we make something and make our own rock-hard bottles and we get all scared that something bad is going to happen. Unless some grand mistake was made....unless the bottles are going to go beyond hard and begin to bulge....I would think just leave them alone. No harm, no foul. There's something about creating this "living fluid" that maybe us noobs think the logical next step is some giant explosion. Maybe not. Maybe it should all just be put away.

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Fermentation temp and time were fine. 2 weeks on a standard refill is plenty.

I'd like to hear more about the priming sugar, too. How much is "2 scoops"?

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2 scoops is supposed to be 2.5 teaspoons.

I have the sugar scoop from Mr. B as well and hate the thing since I'm not sure where the top of it is. I measured mine out on the 3/4 teaspoon side and it was more like 1 teaspoon.

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ba1980 wrote:
2 scoops is supposed to be 2.5 teaspoons.

I have the sugar scoop from Mr. B as well and hate the thing since I'm not sure where the top of it is. I measured mine out on the 3/4 teaspoon side and it was more like 1 teaspoon
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But I'm thinking one of those scoops (1 1/4 tsp) is what goes into a liter bottle, not 2 scoops. No?

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ba1980 wrote:

2 scoops is supposed to be 2.5 teaspoons.

I have the sugar scoop from Mr. B as well and hate the thing since I'm not sure where the top of it is. I measured mine out on the 3/4 teaspoon side and it was more like 1 teaspoon.

Yeah I bought one of those scoops when I started and could never figure out how full it's supposed to be. Haven't used it for 2 years.

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We are talking about the MrB scoop with two sides, each one is a little tube with one side full and the other has a U-shape cut-out, right???

I find it very nice to work with. You just dip it in sideways with the full side down, then hold it upright and it satys full up to the point where the cut-out starts.

The small side is for pints and the large side is for quarts. I just wish they had a third scoop for 12 oz bottles.

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Here is what I am *guessing*:

The right amount of priming sugar for a mid-range level of carb (2.5) is ~1.5tsp. Looking at the scoop one side is 1 1/4 tsp and the other is 3/4 tsp.

I'm guessing that you maybe used two scoops of the larger side and ended up with ~2.5 tsp instead of using the smaller side and getting 1.5tsp.

Possible?

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Yea guys I used the cylinder scoop from Mr Beer. I used 2 of the large(1 1/4 tsp) scoops for my 1 liter PET bottles. This is not the point though folks. My main worry was that chilling the beer prematurely to stop it form overflowing and then returning it to warm conditioning might have caused some problems with the quality/taste of the beer. I realized that I probably used a little too much sugar when the bottle overflowed when I tried to relieve some pressure. thats why I refrigerated it for a while, to slow the yeast, and stop the overflow. thanks for all the help though guys.

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I wonder if you jumped the gun on the "overcarbing". I'm doing some experiments with a few bottles.....usually the end near the trub....adding different sugar levels, and playing with them. I have one that I deliberately oversugared.....every once in a while I would open it a bit, let a little air out, and close it back up. I will let these go longer and see what they taste like down the road.

Maybe in your case you should not have opened them at all. This is why I want to know what the limit is on these PET bottles. Can they really explode and what would it take? I would think it's rare. If you used glass bottles, sure you might have explosions but with the PET bottles I think I would have just accepted them as rock hard and keep storing them.

Another thing is that if they're on the warmer room temp side they may spray. If that's the case, put one in the fridge for an hour, get the temp down and then try to release air?

This is assuming that the releasing of air is the right move, and something tells me it's not.

I don't think cooling and then re-room temp conditioning will cause trouble. Like someone said the yeast sleeps when it's cold and then can be woken up when warmed up.

My question is.....were they really that overcarbed to begin with?

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Fee wrote:


Maybe in your case you should not have opened them at all. This is why I want to know what the limit is on these PET bottles. Can they really explode and what would it take?


Yes, they can explode. I'm not sure how much it takes, but they will definitely burst. One advantage to PET bottles is that if they're overcarbed, you get some warning first because they will start to bulge a bit.


This is assuming that the releasing of air is the right move, and something tells me it's not.


If you're overcarbed, venting can release the pressure. Why would you think it would not be a good move?

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Fee,

It takes all kinds of people to make up a world, and I think that's great. I happen to be one of the type that believes it's good to question everything. If you're right, you could make a significant contribution to the current knowledge base. If you're wrong, you learn that the concept you question was right all along. How terrible is that?

I took a shot at brewing beer many years back, but it didn't take for me. At that time, I was putting my glass bottles of brew inside cardboard boxes. (Thank goodness). I tended to prime on the heavy side. I had a few batches that were great. I did have two batches of bombs, also.

I don't know how the plastic bottles will respond to over priming. But after a lifetime of questioning established wisdom, I have accepted one thing as gospel truth: "Better safe than sorry".

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Brew-tality wrote:

Yea guys I used the cylinder scoop from Mr Beer. I used 2 of the large(1 1/4 tsp) scoops for my 1 liter PET bottles. This is not the point though folks. My main worry was that chilling the beer prematurely to stop it form overflowing and then returning it to warm conditioning might have caused some problems with the quality/taste of the beer. I realized that I probably used a little too much sugar when the bottle overflowed when I tried to relieve some pressure. thats why I refrigerated it for a while, to slow the yeast, and stop the overflow. thanks for all the help though guys.

To answer your question, it's fine to take them out of the fridge to continue warm conditioning. It won't have adverse affects.

Cheers!

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I'm only questioning the release of the pressure IF it's not truly overcarbed.

Yeah, I'm an experimenter by nature, but I'm learning to do that sparingly. I have another couple of bottles that I undercarbed a bit.....I am interested in seeing how they turn out just so I know. I don't think I did any overcarbing that will cause explosions, I don't think I went that far.

We'll find out though!

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I don't know about anyone else ,but, I'm doing my first batch of Whispering Wheat and it was rock hard in about 2-3 days. Now at 2weeks it's still rock hard and the bottles have still are not bulging . I have not released any pressure either.. Will be cold conditioning soon. I guess you should maybe have waited a bit .. I'm by no means anything but a real noob..

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I had carb issues on my first brew as well. I measured 2tsp into each bottle because I heard that the 2.5 tsp was on the high side so I just pulled that number out of the air. Some bottles were rock hard with slightly bulging caps, others were just hard, and one was rather soft compared to the others. Long story short, I am down to 4 liters left and of the 4 that I have drank, the carb has been fairly consistent. I am a little concerned about the softer one, but I will just have to drink it quick before the carb dissipates. (Hopefully leaving it to condition even longer than 6 weeks might help).

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