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Bottle prime question?

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Could any of the priming sugar be left in the bottom of these bottles? Or is it just sediment from the LBK? It is undercarbinated after 2 weeks in the bottle and 3 days in the fridge. I could understand if there was some trub in the last few bottles, but everyone is the same. They all have a little stuff (it looks like trub)in the bottom. I used a little less than 3/4 teaspoon of cane sugar in each 12 oz brown bottle. The only way to get a head is to pour from on high. I made LOTS of mistakes with this batch because it was B4 I found you people on this forum.
The fermenting room was too cold, other times too hot (temp. swings).
I didn't use enough yeast.
I accidentally put in WAY too many adjucts (got confused about which recipe I was following - a Homer Simpson moment!)
Life is good now since I found you guys, but I'm still curious. If mr beer bottle priming amounts are too high, and I followed them, and mine is under carbed...could it be that the yeast gave up?
The beer is actually drinkable, it just needs more carbination. Its not flat, just not great either. It taste like a Budweiser with added Coriander. Its not sweet, but has a honey texture. I'm not complaining, I'll drink it and learn. It has a F.Gravity (now, from the fridge) of 1.010. It does give me a buzz.
For the record, not only are my brews much better now that I found you guys, but from now on I will be Batch priming.
Here's what I dumped in it because I got distracted:
1 HME WC Pale Ale
1 booster
1-1/2 cup Honey
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1 teasp. nutmeg
1-1/2 teasp. Coriander home grown fresh ground

When I realized I had twice the adjuncts, I threw in all the yeast I had, in case it could be saved. All I had was 2 packs of fromunda.
:S

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Its the adjuncts that are killing your head. If you want a good quality carb with a head that lasts, use more malts, less adjuncts.

What temperature were the bottles at for the two weeks conditioning? Two weeks is too early to put them in the fridge, but if they were at room temperature, they should be carbonated.

I'd take them out of the fridge and give them another two weeks, at least, at room temperature and see what you get. My guess is that it will be much better.

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Guest System Admin

Sorry to not be more specific. I only put 2 bottles in the fridge for comparison. I am willing to leave the rest in warm conditioning (64-65)F for a LONG time. I could even move them to a warmer room, since its fromunda yeast (67-70).
After a week, when I realized they were fermenting in a room that had temperature swings (62 at night, 73 at day), I moved them to a room that was constant 64-65 F.
I know the amount of adjuncts is bad, all the way around. I just wonder what that stuff is in the bottom. I wouldn't expect trub to be in the first dozen bottles. Is there any chance the yeast hasn't gotten to all the priming sugar yet?

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Guest System Admin

Although, they DON'T taste sweet, so maybe I answered my own question......

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After bottling, the brew goes through a mini version of fermentation...so expect a small amount of trub at the bottom of you brew. Nothing is wrong if you drink that, but I wouldn't recommend it (taste and the runns....lol). Anyways point is sediment will be present in all your bottles. The part of putting them in the fridge further settles the floaties and compacts the small amount of sediment and kinda sticks it to bottom. Pouring out slowly should help in not disturbing it.

In avoiding the drinking of the sediment also means you don't nessesarily drink all your brew in the bottle.........of course due to not wanting to drink the sediment.

Read the beginners sticky.....good stuff on there.

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After reading everything I could find, I expected the fridge to clear some of the sediment and put it on the bottom, I just didn't expect that to happen in warm conditioning. And they all have it (20 bottles still in warm conditioning). In pouring the cold sample, I went slow, but there was no keeping some of it from getting in the glass.
Maybe this is a case where cold crashing would have kept more of it out of the bottle...

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You will never avoid the bottle trub, it's part of the carbonation process. However, by pouring smoothly and leaving about a quarter of an inch of beer in the bottom of the bottle, you should be able to avoid the floaties.

Cold crashing is an option. I've never done it and haven't had any issues with too much bottle trub.

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Carbonation, head, head retention and lacing are related, but dfferent. It sounds to me like you've got carbonation, since you can get a head to form if you pour down the middle. The head probably dissipates quickly, though.

As already noted, since you used a lot of adjuncts, you won't get much in the way of head, and even less in the way of head retention and lacing. If you want those, you need to avoid adjuncts. Also, you'll probably find that even if you use no adjuncts, an all extract beer may not have as much head, retention or lacing as you'd like. You can improve those by steeping or mashing grains.

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bpgreen wrote:

Carbonation, head, head retention and lacing are related, but dfferent. It sounds to me like you've got carbonation, since you can get a head to form if you pour down the middle. The head probably dissipates quickly, though.

As already noted, since you used a lot of adjuncts, you won't get much in the way of head, and even less in the way of head retention and lacing. If you want those, you need to avoid adjuncts. Also, you'll probably find that even if you use no adjuncts, an all extract beer may not have as much head, retention or lacing as you'd like. You can improve those by steeping or mashing grains.

@bpgreen

Couldn't you add maltodextrin in an adjunct heavy brew to increase and retain head and lacing? or am I wrong about that as an additon?

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Brewish wrote:

bpgreen wrote:

Carbonation, head, head retention and lacing are related, but dfferent. It sounds to me like you've got carbonation, since you can get a head to form if you pour down the middle. The head probably dissipates quickly, though.

As already noted, since you used a lot of adjuncts, you won't get much in the way of head, and even less in the way of head retention and lacing. If you want those, you need to avoid adjuncts. Also, you'll probably find that even if you use no adjuncts, an all extract beer may not have as much head, retention or lacing as you'd like. You can improve those by steeping or mashing grains.

@bpgreen

Couldn't you add maltodextrin in an adjunct heavy brew to increase and retain head and lacing? or am I wrong about that as an additon?

I've never used matodextrin. It seems to me to be a somewhat convoluted approach, though. Why add something to counter using too many adjuncts? Why not just cut back on the adjuncts in the first place? I use adjuncts sparingly, if at all.

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