Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
GarretSTL

Bottom of LBK vs Bottom of Bottle

Recommended Posts

Just wondering what the difference between the trub at the bottom of the LBK and the settlement at the bottom of the bottles after bottling is? Should you try to not let the settlement in the bottles mix up with the beer before drinking or is it like a wheat beer where you should gently disturb it to mix before drinking?

Noob question, I know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You get trub in the bottle because is naturally carbonated. When you pour, try not to pour the trub into the bottle. When you condition, the trub settles and compacts. I warm condition for several months and cold condition in the fridge for a couple of weeks. I can generally pour the whole bottle without getting any trub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't want to mix the trub in the bottle into what you want to drink. It will give you off flavors.I pour one of my first batch bottles all into the glass just to see how the trub tasted. I could see the cloudy trub mixing into the ale as I poured it. It had off flavors including the dreaded green apple flavor. I'm glad I did it because I now know what it tastes like. I am a firm believer in intentionally doing something I am not supposed to do as a learning tool. Experience is the best teacher.

If you don't mind wasting one bottle, go ahead and mix it up and drink it. It won't kill you and you will learn what off flavors it gives you. You will then recognize it in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It will definitely taste different but n my experience hasn't been awful. I generally pour as much as I can out without getting any sediment, drink that, and then pour the rest out. It's always been quite drinkable for me at least

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any way to not get that trub in the bottle? When you drink any beer from the store, you don't have to deal with any unwanted settlement at the bottom of the bottles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here is a nifty lookin product but looks kindof spendy to get it though. i have not tried myself but someone on here about 2 months ago said he had them and worked good.

click here!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GarretSTL wrote:

Is there any way to not get that trub in the bottle? When you drink any beer from the store, you don't have to deal with any unwanted settlement at the bottom of the bottles.


You can pasteurize at bottling time, filter and force carbonate. It's actually possible to do this at home, but it's not real straightforward. Is much simpler to naturally carbonate. I force carbonate when I keg, and I've toyed with getting the necessary equipment to bottle from the keg, but usually I just bottle some batches, carbonating them naturally and keg the others, force carbonating those.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GarretSTL wrote:

Is there any way to not get that trub in the bottle? When you drink any beer from the store, you don't have to deal with any unwanted settlement at the bottom of the bottles.

Most commercial beers don't bottle condition...though maybe it's my imagination but it seems like the commercial number of bottle conditioned beers has been increasing, especially in certain styles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it gives it a more authentic look that some people appreciate. I also recently read that it supposedly makes the beer healthier!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JonEleven wrote:

I think it gives it a more authentic look that some people appreciate. I also recently read that it supposedly makes the beer healthier!

Yup it contains b vitamins which actually is a vitamin lost from consuming alcohol and causes hang overs ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The simplest answers are always the best so here goes. Every time you move your beer to another container, whether you call it a secondary fermentor, bottling bucket or whatever you are in effect cleaning your beer. Transferring the beer this way leaves the trub behind in the original container greatly reducing the amounts that might get into the bottles.

Of course using fining agents like WhirFloc at the end of the wort boil and then cold crashing your beer to settle out the yeast before bottling are two other good practices to follow that also help clear up your beer too. As for the trub in wheat beers, they're the only beer I want to get some of the trub into my glass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mnstarzz13 wrote:

JonEleven wrote:

I think it gives it a more authentic look that some people appreciate. I also recently read that it supposedly makes the beer healthier!

Yup it contains b vitamins which actually is a vitamin lost from consuming alcohol and causes hang overs ;)

and does wonders for your intestinal tract, at least its been my experience. I know, TMI, but its a tasty detox....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pour carefully into a glass then drink the trub you pay a fortune for it in the stores

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...