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Nagorg

Still fermenting after 3 weeks??

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Guys, hopefully some light can be shed here....

~3 weeks ago, I brewed a batch that resulted in an OG of 1.060. While I haven't taken a second hydrometer yet, I can say that there is still activity in my LBK. I know this because I have an older style with an airlock and there are still bubbles escaping every so often. In fact, earlier this week I noticed quite a bit of bubbling going on again after a ~1 week period of quietness. I can also see a particle or two swirling around if I watch with my flashlight a little while.

I pitched an entire 11.5g packet of Safbrew T-58 in my wort 3 weeks ago. I know that is a lot but supposedly its better to have more yeast with such a high OG. My ambient temp has been pretty much between 68-72 degrees this whole time.

I wanted to bottle this weekend but I'm wondering if I should give it another week. I am going to take a FG before bottling but don't want to waste beer if its just not finished yet.

Thoughts?

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I recently had a higher OG beer continue to bubble throughout the three week fermentation period, and I know it had hit the Final Gravity. I bottled it a week ago, and nothing's exploded, so I assume things are good.

Take some more readings and see what they tell you.

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Cool, so this "can be" expected in some cases then. I kinda figured another SG reading was in the cards. The airlock activity and the particle movement at this stage really surprised me.

I suppose I'll hunt for a good deal on a refractometer so that I don't have to waste so much beer measuring SG..

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I've had a few batches that still had an inch of foam on top after 3 weeks at 68 degrees but the hydrometer said it was done so I bottled it. I can't explain the foam, but they turned out fine.

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I had one batch with lots of foam at 3 weeks too. I moved the keg to a room that was 60 deg. or a little less. The next morning the foam was nearly gone. The FG was actually 2 or 3 points lower than the est.

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Update:
This beer wound up with an FG of 1.0109. So, all is well!

One thing... It has a taste that reminds me of a lambic which I don't care for really. Hopefully that will condition out. Could this note be from the safbrew t-58 yeast?

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Nagorg wrote:

Update:
This beer wound up with an FG of 1.0109. So, all is well!

One thing... It has a taste that reminds me of a lambic which I don't care for really. Hopefully that will condition out. Could this note be from the safbrew t-58 yeast?


Can you describe the flavor?

If I remember correctly, T-58 contributes spicy/peppery flavors.

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An almost slightly sour aftertaste. It is what I pickup the few times I have had Lambic style beers. It wasn't terrible but it did hit me funny. Again, I'm just hoping that taste is gone after conditioning. If not, I'll drink it anyway...
:gulp:

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One thing... It has a taste that reminds me of a lambic which I don't care for really. Hopefully that will condition out. Could this note be from the safbrew t-58 yeast?

I have a beer that ended up having lambic flavors as well. I was curious, what hops did you use, and did you leave them in the LBK for the entire fermentation period like Mr. Beer recommends?

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Nagorg wrote:

An almost slightly sour aftertaste. It is what I pickup the few times I have had Lambic style beers. It wasn't terrible but it did hit me funny. Again, I'm just hoping that taste is gone after conditioning. If not, I'll drink it anyway...
:gulp:

Taking everything into consideration, I think you may have true lambic on your hands. Going from 1.060 to 1.0109 would be a stretch for something like Nottingham, but it seems way too much to expect from t-58.

Combined with your description of the taste, I suspect the yeast had some help from something wild.

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bpgreen wrote:

Nagorg wrote:

An almost slightly sour aftertaste. It is what I pickup the few times I have had Lambic style beers. It wasn't terrible but it did hit me funny. Again, I'm just hoping that taste is gone after conditioning. If not, I'll drink it anyway...
:gulp:

Taking everything into consideration, I think you may have true lambic on your hands. Going from 1.060 to 1.0109 would be a stretch for something like Nottingham, but it seems way too much to expect from t-58.

Combined with your description of the taste, I suspect the yeast had some help from something wild.

Just out of curiosity, what about the fromunda yeast? Could 6 grams of that handle an OG of ~1.06 without producing lambic-like characteristics?

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smgarrett wrote:

bpgreen wrote:

Nagorg wrote:

An almost slightly sour aftertaste. It is what I pickup the few times I have had Lambic style beers. It wasn't terrible but it did hit me funny. Again, I'm just hoping that taste is gone after conditioning. If not, I'll drink it anyway...
:gulp:

Taking everything into consideration, I think you may have true lambic on your hands. Going from 1.060 to 1.0109 would be a stretch for something like Nottingham, but it seems way too much to expect from t-58.

Combined with your description of the taste, I suspect the yeast had some help from something wild.

Just out of curiosity, what about the fromunda yeast? Could 6 grams of that handle an OG of ~1.06 without producing lambic-like characteristics?


The fromunda yeast can handle an OG of 1.060 without any problem at all. When it gets close to its limits, attenuation drops, but it can handle an ABV up to about 11%. At its best though, I doubt if it attenuates above 75%.

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The fromunda yeast can handle an OG of 1.060 without any problem at all. When it gets close to its limits, attenuation drops, but it can handle an ABV up to about 11%. At its best though, I doubt if it attenuates above 75%.

I figured that wasn't my issue, since nobody mentioned the possibility. Still, it's good to know the limitations of the yeast for future reference.

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To answer the hops question, I used Fuggle hops and I did dry hop the entire 3 weeks. This may be a contributing factor since I have since learned it's better to not dry hop during the first week.

@bpgreen: Something wild huh? From the hop's perhaps? That's the only thing that wasn't soaked in StarSan. I use vodka in my airlock so I doubt anything came in from there. Interesting possibility though...

I did want to add that I used an entire 11.5g packet in my LBK. Maybe that helped with the FG?

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Nagorg wrote:

To answer the hops question, I used Fuggle hops and I did dry hop the entire 3 weeks. This may be a contributing factor since I have since learned it's better to not dry hop during the first week.

@bpgreen: Something wild huh? From the hop's perhaps? That's the only thing that wasn't soaked in StarSan. I use vodka in my airlock so I doubt anything came in from there. Interesting possibility though...

I did want to add that I used an entire 11.5g packet in my LBK. Maybe that helped with the FG?


It could be that the bitter note came from the 3 week hopping. I did this once, not realizing that's a bit too long, and the hops had a noticeable effect on the flavor of the brew. It was Whispering Wheat with Golden Wheat UME and it turned out tasting kind of like grapefruit.

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It could be that the bitter note came from the 3 week hopping. I did this once, not realizing that's a bit too long, and the hops had a noticeable effect on the flavor of the brew. It was Whispering Wheat with Golden Wheat UME and it turned out tasting kind of like grapefruit.

Indeed, grapefruit could be one of the more dominant flavors in my beer as well. I read that if you dry-hop for 3 weeks or so, most of the hop oils will be pulled out of solution by the yeast as it goes dormant. So shouldn't the aroma and flavors be more subtle? Also, did your beer's grapefruit mellow with conditioning?

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Nagorg wrote:

To answer the hops question, I used Fuggle hops and I did dry hop the entire 3 weeks. This may be a contributing factor since I have since learned it's better to not dry hop during the first week.

@bpgreen: Something wild huh? From the hop's perhaps? That's the only thing that wasn't soaked in StarSan. I use vodka in my airlock so I doubt anything came in from there. Interesting possibility though...

I did want to add that I used an entire 11.5g packet in my LBK. Maybe that helped with the FG?


Not from the hops. Hops are naturally antibiotic. They protect the beer from infection.

Using a full packet of yeast will help ensure that it will attenuate to its full potential, but it won't attenuate beyond its capabilities.

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I sampled a bottle at 3 weeks carb/condition. WOW!! This is my best brew yet!!! :woohoo:

No more Lambic taste. Just a lot of awesomeness!!!

:drinking:

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It's great that your beer turned out well. That's always a plus.

As far as still having bubbling through the airlock, today I replaced the blow-off tube with an airlock on the five-gallon batch I brewed last week. A good amount of bubbling, at a rate of about five or six second intervals. I doubt I've reached FG yet, but I've noticed that I still have activity during the third week of fermentation.

Well, today it occurred to me that there may be a number of reasons for bubbling to still occur, at some level, even three weeks in.

The yeast is still active, and while it may not be actively fermenting, as it was during Week One, it's still working. Otherwise we'd have to pitch more yeast when we bottled. The cleaning up they do after completing the fermentation process may produce CO2, and so a little bit of bubbling may occur.

At any rate, as long as the final product is good beer, I don't care what the yeast do or how they do it. :woohoo:

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