Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
corwashere

PET Bottles

Recommended Posts

In the instructions, the directions say "ONLY USE BOTTLES THAT PREVIOUSLY HELD CARBONATED BEVERAGES". Why is that? Is it because they tend to be stronger and can hold up to the rigors of conditioning? I only ask because I drink a lot of vitamin water and, although they are not carbonated, the plastic bottles themselves (yes, they are PET, I looked) are actually thicker and, thus, stronger than most soda bottles that I have seen. If strength is the issue, I don't see why I shouldn't be able to use my vitamin water bottles for bottling / conditioning.

Thoughts?

-cor-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

strength is why. The cap used in water bottles may not hold the carb either, under preassure, the threads may cause a leak/break

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't. Just because they LOOK or FEEL thicker doesn't mean that they are rated to withstand the pressure of carbonation.

Look at glass carboys as an example: They are much thicker than a bottle but are also not rated to hold pressure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

corwashere wrote:

In the instructions, the directions say "ONLY USE BOTTLES THAT PREVIOUSLY HELD CARBONATED BEVERAGES". Why is that? Is it because they tend to be stronger and can hold up to the rigors of conditioning? I only ask because I drink a lot of vitamin water and, although they are not carbonated, the plastic bottles themselves (yes, they are PET, I looked) are actually thicker and, thus, stronger than most soda bottles that I have seen. If strength is the issue, I don't see why I shouldn't be able to use my vitamin water bottles for bottling / conditioning.

Thoughts?

-cor-

cor - If you're willing could be the guinea pig on this one - give it a go. Then, fill us in on the results (good or bad). B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see what you mean about the caps. The caps on the vitamin waters are simply one thread layer down. However, I'd be happy to be the guinea pig for it. I could simply fill 2 vitamin water bottles in a future batch and see what happens. If they explode, then I'm only out 2 beers and we're all the wiser since I will post the results. I probably won't be using them for a while, my first batch is still fermenting (the plain ole' westw coast pale ale from the starter kit) so I still have all of the bottles that came with the kit. I will be bottling those this Saturday and starting a whole new batch for which I will be needing the extra bottles, while the first batch conditions. My wife is a big mountain dew drinker, so she has graciously committed to providing me with her bottles once she is finished with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to state the obvious (but in case you don't know) - those are clear bottles so you will need to keep them in the dark so as not to skunk the beer. (Light interacts with the alpha acids from the hops)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was successful using a seltzer bottle, and a Pelligrino bottle (also seltzer). At least the Pelligrino bottle looked good, although I was worried about that top. I would imagine that anything good enough for seltzer would be fine. PET just stands for the long chemical name of the plastic that's used. How thick it is, how well it's made (any weak spots?) should also matter. But yeah, it sounds like you might just blow the tops off if the threads aren't enough, and strong enough, to keep it in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I had the same thoughts when I looked at the bottles. I have some empty rubbermaid bins with lids that I'll be using for conditioning in my basement so they will be in complete darkness the whole time. I'm even going to be using them for the dark bottles just in case there are some explosions going on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course, it's your choice, but I'd recommend glass bottles with pry-off caps. There's a reason why they're pretty much the industry standard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cor - with all the advice here, if you decide to be the guinea pig on this experiment, then perhaps keep them enclosed in a cooler. That will take care of the light issue and potentially keep the blast zone contained. :sombrero:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad used 2 Lipton Green Tea bottles as a test. I'll know in a couple of more weeks and report back on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing to consider is whether the plastic itself will leak carbonation. Even if it's strong enough to hold the carbonation, it may be more permeable and lose carbonation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bpgreen wrote:

Another thing to consider is whether the plastic itself will leak carbonation. Even if it's strong enough to hold the carbonation, it may be more permeable and lose carbonation.

Ah ha! Brewing and all the ancillary functions are scientific. That's what I will tell my wife. I'm doing this for science, so I can explain my findings to my kids! :work:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, when I first bought this thing my wife was like "Yeah that's cool and all, but will it work?" and I was like "Of course it will work, it's 'science'!" to which she replied, "Yeah, well, I could throw science out the window right about now!".

I had her try a sip of the first batch as I was bottling it tonight but she wasn't impressed, but then again she's not a beer drinker at all so...

-cor-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bottles do not have to have had carbination before, they just have to be strong enough to hold the pressure of fermented beer and keep the light out. I have used all types, 1 lt and 1/2 lt brown PET,
12 oz glass with crip caps, 16 oz flip top and even 5 lt mini keg. Any bottle has advantages and disadvantages. I use 8 oz water bottles for test bottles but beyond that all my bottles are dark. Glass is the best for long shelf life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, does your area have a recycling program? The county we live in parks trailers all over so people can drop off their recyclables (no glass, dagnabit!). My sons and I picked up no less than 40 soda bottles this afternoon.

That's just the 12 oz, brown A&W, and 20 oz Mountain Dew bottles at that. I've not had good luck with Sprite bottles, so I stopped picking them up in any size but 12oz. The stinking lids don't want to go back on (even with new lids!).

Even though the LHBS has 12oz crown caps for only $11.49 a case, I'm still too cheap to buy them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reposted from another bottle thread (got no responses)

On the same thread here, has anyone had any experience in bottling in 2L or 3L soda bottles? I understand about the clear bottle/light part...I'm more concerned about carbonation and fill level. Oh yeah, I am batch priming so the sugar level will be consistent regardless of bottle size.

The reason I ask is because I'm going to have an uncapping event for some "non-believer" friends, and I'm sure all of the brew will be consumed in the same sitting.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hilkertj wrote:

Reposted from another bottle thread (got no responses)

On the same thread here, has anyone had any experience in bottling in 2L or 3L soda bottles? I understand about the clear bottle/light part...I'm more concerned about carbonation and fill level. Oh yeah, I am batch priming so the sugar level will be consistent regardless of bottle size.

The reason I ask is because I'm going to have an uncapping event for some "non-believer" friends, and I'm sure all of the brew will be consumed in the same sitting.

Thanks!


I'm not sure what you're asking. If you're batch priming, it doesn't make much dieter what size the bottles are. If you're using a bottlewand, fill, remove the wand and cap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm getting the impression that the key question is whether or not a 2 or 3 liter bottle is too large to bottle beer in.

Are there any negative non-intended consequences?

Does it have any special problems in the carbonating process because it's so large?

Does it take a lot longer to condition?

Does the beer go flat really fast because the bottle is so big?

In other words, is it a good idea or a bad idea?

That's what I'm picking up.

My only contribution is that I was really worried about even a one liter bottle going flat too fast, but the first one I opened, I drank half one day and the other half the next day. It was only slightly less carbonated than the first day, but still decent.

I think, FWIW, if you're gonna drink it all in one sitting, the 2 or 3 liter bottle is like a mini-keg with only the container and no hardware. I think I would do it in a situation as you describe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you might want to use a picher and pour all the contents out first. If you keep tipping those larger bottles back and forth, after the first few pours, all the trub should be resuspended, and most won't like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bp - sorry my question wasn't clear enough.

JoeC - I guess you are the interpreter, as you hit the root of my question on the head.

yankeedag - great tip on using a pitcher. After all this will be a tasting event and we don't won't the trub.

Thanks guys. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i was inquiring about vitamin water and gatorade bottles and they said try one. i was worried about the lack of threads and believe that is the issue. i was also told root beer bottles, while they are dark, are no good to use. something about root beer stains the bottles and has a lot of bacteria. i use 1 litre and 20 oz. pop bottles put them in a box with newspaper over the top and get great carbonation. i have 3 cases of mr beer bottles and use those for the high end recipes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...