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JerryOnDrums

Sticky says I'm too hot, but LBK is still partyin'

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Yeah, so like the title says. I don't have any easy way to cool the keg (outside of putting it in the fridge), so I was wondering if anybody else has dealt with the stick-on temp gauge registering "too warm", but just let the LBK do it's thing anyway?

The ambient air temp is a steady 70 degrees, and the 3 brews before this haven't experienced any overheating after fermenting in the exact same way/place. I'm assuming that since the yeasties are going to town, that maybe I'm just one the line of "almost-too-warm" fermenting temps?

Btw, this is the Grand Bohemian Czech Pilsner, with a half-can of Pale Export UME and 2.5 packets of Fromunda yeast.

I'm probably overreacting, but any thoughts?

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Well the yeast will ferment even up into the 80s, and they will do so faster than at lower temperatures. The problem is that at these temperatures you will be getting a lot of off flavors, some just weird and others plain bad.
What does your sticker say?

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Some folks have recommended putting a damp towel on the LBK (not too heavy, you don't want to block the vents) and the evaporation will cool it down a couple of degrees

or put the LBK in a cooler with some ice or blue-ice packs

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Seventy degrees isn't too bad for the Fromunda yeast, but keep in mind that even if the yeast aren't killed by an elevated temperature, they may be stressed, and that can lead to off-flavors in the finished product.

What many of us do to lower the temperature in the LBK is put it in a large cooler with some ice packs. One or two will do. It's a pain to babysit it, since you have to change them out every 12 hours, but it'll put your yeast in a happier zone and you won't risk off-flavors.

Others put the LBK in a pan of water and drape a T-shirt over the LBK, so the ends are in the water. The capillary action draws water into the shirt and cools the fermenter. I've never done this, as I live in a high-humidity region, and don't want to risk mold and mildew.

But the ice packs in a cooler work pretty well.

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The temp in my place is kept at 72F, but the kitchen where the LBKs are stored can get hotter when I'm cooking dinner. What I've done, until such time as I get a couple of styrofoam coolers, is just put a couple of frozen blue ice packs on either side of the lbk and cover all of them with a towel. I've managed to keep the temp listed on the exterior sticky thermometer reading around 68F (I keep the ice packs away from the thermometer so it doesn't get a reading off of the ice pack). I have enough ice packs that I change them once in the morning and once in the evening and it seems to work.

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I found myself in this situation tonight. Last night, I brewed up a batch and used T-58 yeast for this brew. The temp on my LBK was 70 degrees when I pitched the yeast. I placed the LBK in my spot with the other two. When I got in from work today, the temp on the LBK was 76 degrees, which is at the top of the range for T-58. So into the cooler with some ice packs on top of the lid to see if I can bring the temp back down. I'm hoping it didn't get too high for too long.

Interestingly enough, the temps on the other 2 LBKs were only showing 72 degrees. Still higher than they should have been, as I seem to have some family members who believe they know best how to adjust thermostats. But of course, it was the "not me" ghost who is guilty.

I'm really starting to think more and more about a box like Screwy built.

Rick

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I've got a nut brown in an LBK in an ice chest (its' a good one too) and I only need 1 or 2 small blue ice packs to keep it at 66 non stop. Sometimes I use one and sometimes 2. My A/C gets to 80 while we are at work and I'm not paying $$$$ to cool the house while I'm not here but even a crappy ice chest makes a difference.
I got about 12 of the small ice packs so I alternate every 12 hours or so.

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"rickbray66" post=252368 said:

I found myself in this situation tonight. Last night, I brewed up a batch and used T-58 yeast for this brew. The temp on my LBK was 70 degrees when I pitched the yeast. I placed the LBK in my spot with the other two. When I got in from work today, the temp on the LBK was 76 degrees, which is at the top of the range for T-58. So into the cooler with some ice packs on top of the lid to see if I can bring the temp back down. I'm hoping it didn't get too high for too long.

Interestingly enough, the temps on the other 2 LBKs were only showing 72 degrees. Still higher than they should have been, as I seem to have some family members who believe they know best how to adjust thermostats. But of course, it was the "not me" ghost who is guilty.

I'm really starting to think more and more about a box like Screwy built.

Rick

Depending on what you want out of the T-58, that may not be such a bad thing. T-58 can produce a peppery/spicy aroma and flavor. If you used it for that reason, you'll probably be happy, because the higher temperatures will accentuate the yeast contribution. If you don't like spicy/peppery contributions from the yeast, you may have a beer that takes some getting used to.

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If I'm reading this correctly, the ambient temps are 70, but the Mr. B freebie sticker thingee is reading 'too hot', which means that your beer temp is over 76. If it were me, I'd be trying to keep that sticker in the 'too cold' (which is why I don't use that sticker) to avoid fusels and other off flavors. For this batch, the deal may be done, but I would immediately sit it in a baking tray or something (tupperware/cooler/something big enough to hold the LBK and some water), put cold water and ice/ice packs in that tray (not up to the level of the spigot on the LBK), and cover the LBK with a wet t-shirt that is in the water on each side to attempt to get it to 65ish.

Here's one of my buckets in that kind of setup:

100_1094.JPG

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"bpgreen" post=252397 said:

"rickbray66" post=252368 said:

I found myself in this situation tonight. Last night, I brewed up a batch and used T-58 yeast for this brew. The temp on my LBK was 70 degrees when I pitched the yeast. I placed the LBK in my spot with the other two. When I got in from work today, the temp on the LBK was 76 degrees, which is at the top of the range for T-58. So into the cooler with some ice packs on top of the lid to see if I can bring the temp back down. I'm hoping it didn't get too high for too long.

Interestingly enough, the temps on the other 2 LBKs were only showing 72 degrees. Still higher than they should have been, as I seem to have some family members who believe they know best how to adjust thermostats. But of course, it was the "not me" ghost who is guilty.

I'm really starting to think more and more about a box like Screwy built.

Rick

Depending on what you want out of the T-58, that may not be such a bad thing. T-58 can produce a peppery/spicy aroma and flavor. If you used it for that reason, you'll probably be happy, because the higher temperatures will accentuate the yeast contribution. If you don't like spicy/peppery contributions from the yeast, you may have a beer that takes some getting used to.

Thanks bpgreen! That's exactly why I used T-58 for the spicy/peppery character, so hopefully all is good.

PatBattle: I'm not certain about the thermometer on the side of the LBK registering ambient temperatures. The other 2 LBKs were registering 72 degrees and this one at 76 degrees was sitting right between the other 2. Also, I've noticed other temperature variances during the first full day of fermentation, so it seems it would be showing the temp inside the LBK.

Rick

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I luvs me a wet t-shirt photo.


If I understand correctly you are fermenting where the room temp is 70 but the temp strip on your LBK is over and above 76? If so, that's too hot.

Your yeast will keep working at that temp, but as mentioned above they are going to be stressed and throw off some off-flavors and potentially a lot of fusel alcohol. Can you say "headaches"?


I guy at my work finally decided to try brewing after eharing me talk all about it. He and his wife bought a 5g extract kit, brewed it up, asked me about conditioning times, etc. and eventually shared a bottle with me.

He warned me that it was strong. He and his wife typically woke up with headaches after having just 1-22oz bomber each. I tried the beer and immediately got the alcohol burn. Couldn't drink the rest of it.

I spoke to him the next day and asked him what his fermenting temp was, pretty much knowing the answer. "78 degrees".

After talking to him about the importance of temps, he was jazzed to make a new batch that wouldn't burn and give him headaches.

Point being: You need to get your temps under control. You may get away with it once, twice or even often. But you won't be making the best beer that you can.

Good luck.

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Kealia,

I understand what you are saying and it's one of the reasons I've been looking at a lot of posts with cooling ideas. Unfortunately, my space is extremely limited, which greatly limits my options.


Rick

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