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Scooley01

Recommended Recipe for lovers of Shiner Bock?

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I'm going on a river trip with a large group of people that typically drink Shiner (Bock or other varieties). I've been thinking about brewing a couple large batches to take on the trip...Are there any recipes that you might recommend that a Shiner-drinker would enjoy?

I'm not looking for a clone necessarily, just something in the same vein.

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I am also looking to make a shiner bock clone and I am going to try these back to back with the same bock yeast. Shiner has a SRM of 13 and a color of 18.

Dubble trouble and the brew ha ha bock to see if they are similar. Also if you like the Shiner dark lager you can try making the schwarz beer or make a linebacker bock with creamy brown and additional hops to make it a lager.

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Good suggestions, Harlick, except that additional hops won't make it a lager... You need to use a lager yeast strain and brew at cooler temps to produce a true lager. Otherwise, both those recipes sound like they'd appeal to Shiner fans, whether they're brewed as true lagers or as ales...
:chug:

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You can get the Saflager Yeast from the store that is a little less picky on the temp for the Lager. My question with that would be if you do brew it at the higher temps, does it create ale flavor though it is a lager yeast?

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I brewed The Bavarian Bronze and thought it was a very good Shiner clone. I boiled the hops with the booster and then poured in the UME.

Bohemian Bronze
Light bronze in color, this refreshing thirst quencher features caramel malts perfectly complemented by light noble hops. Bohemian Bronze is a great summer and fall brew.

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I read somewhere on the Internet that both ale and lager beers all end up with pretty much the same tasting beer. Myself I've only brewed using dry and liquid ale brewing yeasts, so I can't share any real world lager experiences with you.

I'm sipping a Fast Break Bock that I brewed back on April 10, 2010 and I'm wondering if drinking bock beer is going to be an aquired taste for me.

I followed my standard 3 week fermentation, 3 week carbonation at 70F. and minimum 3 week conditioning times. The beer is clear and free of trub with a good long lasting head of foam. It also has a nice fizz and a smooth finish and a flavor that I found to be reminiscent of a Pilsner but yet somewhat different.

I'm down to my last 2 bottles now and I think I'll save the last one to sample along with the Linebacker Doppel Bock w/Creamy Brown I brewed back on June 10, 2010, it should be ready for drinking by the end of July 2010.

The Screwy Brewer

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I don't think I would agree with the "ale and lager" tasting the same. Different yeasts, different tastes. I've been doing Ales for a good spell now, and I only did one True Lager (took a while to make it). It had a nice "german" bier taste to it that's not quite the same as the ales I make. So I lean on the fence of.."how you make it and with what" group.

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I can understand too cool temperatures slowing down the yeasties ability to produce well and would recommend extending the fermentation times to compensate. But I have to think that too warm temperatures might harm or kill the yeasties and that can only mean really bad things for your beer.

The Screwy Brewer

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I use the Ale yeast for my Ales, and I used the Lager yeast for my "cold" one.

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Different flavors are going to be evident when you use ale yeast as opposed to lager yeast. This is due to the yeast characteristics and the temperature that you are fermenting at. I think if you would do a side-by-side comparison of the same brew fermented as both an ale and a lager, you would notice differences.

That being said, it's easier to ferment most beers as an ale. The traditional lager style beers that I have brewed as ales have all been enjoyable beers, but I know that they would likely be very different if I had been able to use lager yeast. That's the best thing about this hobby is that it is YOUR beer and if you enjoy the way that you make it, who cares if it is true to style? As long as you enjoy it - that is what matters.

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I make ales due to local high ambient temps here in Texas(hades). I have been using the excellent US-05 yeast from Mr Beer. It leaves a very clean beer flavor. Obviously not a lager, but very clean beery goodness.

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Sham Addams wrote:

I have been using the excellent US-05 yeast from Mr Beer. It leaves a very clean beer flavor. Obviously not a lager, but very clean beery goodness.

Thanks for the reminder.

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