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NewBrewer2012

Dead St. Patrick's Stout?

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Greetings! This is my very first post, even though I've been a member for several months reading the forums and trying to learn what I can. That being said, I'm perplexed...

My very first batch of Mr. Beer was the Cowboy Lager. I followed the directions and did the 2-2-2 method, and it turned out pretty good. I'm more of a dark beer (stout and porter) kinda guy, so I thought I'd give St. Patrick's Stout a shot. This time, I also followed the directions to the letter with no extra ingredients, just the can of HME, the packet of yeast and booster. I let it sit in the LBK for 2 weeks, then carbed, bottled and let sit at room temperature for 2 weeks, then moved it into the fridge for 2 weeks. At the end of the second week in the fridge, I popped one open. Disappointingly, it tasted somewhere between cidery and vinegary, but not overbearing. I figured it wasn't quite ready yet, so I let it sit another week.

As of today, 4/17, the SPS has been in the fridge for 22 days. I was about to pop one and try it, but for some odd reason decided to consult the board here looking for info. Came across a fellow brewer that made a Shillelagh Stout, let sit for two weeks after he bottled and was worried if he'd killed his yeast after they were in the fridge for 12 hours. Apparently not, he was safe to pull them out and the yeast would come alive and do their thing, according to you brewers. One gentleman stated that stouts and porters need to warm condition at room temperature for 4-6 weeks before going into the fridge. Reading his post got me thinking, maybe I did the same thing being a newb and not knowing any better.

Soooooooooooo, my question is this: is my beer ruined? If not, can it be salvaged? ANY input and advice would be greatly welcomed! :)


-Rob

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Take it out of the fridge and let sit at room temperature for a month before putting a sample bottle back in for a test. The yeast will wake up when the bottles warm up.

I keep all my beer at room temperature, and only put a bottle or two of each in the fridge for drinking. Longer conditioning time will definitely improve the taste. For booster recipes, I would leave them at room temp for at least 6 weeks after bottling.

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I didn't brew a Mr. Beer stout but did brew a kit stout that took almost 6 weeks before I enjoyed it. The first try at week 3 was extremely dry and didn't even taste much like stout. It's very good now at 8 weeks or so.
I drink all my beers warmer than most. I take it out the fridge, open it, pour it then taste it then let it sit for about 5 minutes. Depending how long I take to drink it, I can actually get 3 different tastes from the first to last taste. Much depends on the type of beer as well since to me, ales are better warmer and show their flavor more as they warm up. Stouts are the same for me.

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+1 to taking them out of the fridge for a month or so. The complexity of a stout will always take longer to condition and the booster probably isn't helping the cidery taste. Let it condition at room temps for a month, pop one in the fridge for a few days and give us an update.

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I just bottled St Patrick's Stout yesterday after 2 weeks 3 days in the keg. I gotta tell you, the sweet, cidery aroma that hit me when I started bottling and when I took the lid off the LBK was overwhelming. My original plan was to leave it in the bottles 4 weeks before refridgerating. Now I'm not so sure. My new thinking is 5-6 weeks (which probably wouldn't hurt anyway). Is that strong aroma normal for a stout at the bottling stage?

K

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"McBeerson" post=253847 said:

I just bottled St Patrick's Stout yesterday after 2 weeks 3 days in the keg. I gotta tell you, the sweet, cidery aroma that hit me when I started bottling and when I took the lid off the LBK was overwhelming. My original plan was to leave it in the bottles 4 weeks before refridgerating. Now I'm not so sure. My new thinking is 5-6 weeks (which probably wouldn't hurt anyway). Is that strong aroma normal for a stout at the bottling stage?

K


I have a St Patricks Irish stout in the bottle right now. Mine did not have that cidery aroma when I bottled it. But then again, I also replaced the booster with Plain Dark DME. What temps did yours ferment at?

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I have a question about this beer too. I just bottled my batch Sunday. Added 1/2 teaspoon of corn sugar to each 16 oz bottle. It's been two days and the bottles don't seem to be getting hard. was 1/2 teaspoon sugar not enough?
Thanks
Steve

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I appreciate y'all's help. I just pulled the stout out of the fridge, so now it's sitting in my laundry room at a balmy 72 degrees. It's the same room where I had my LBK, and it's usually always between 70-74 in there. Now that they're out of the fridge and will be for the next 4 weeks, if everything goes to plan the yeast should start waking up before too long and start doing their thing, right?

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"Wrangler95CSA" post=253873 said:

I appreciate y'all's help. I just pulled the stout out of the fridge, so now it's sitting in my laundry room at a balmy 72 degrees. It's the same room where I had my LBK, and it's usually always between 70-74 in there. Now that they're out of the fridge and will be for the next 4 weeks, if everything goes to plan the yeast should start waking up before too long and start doing their thing, right?

I think your right on. I had a carbonation issue with mine too. And I think it was due to temp. I was storing mine in my basement which is at 63/64F. After a couple of tests that were low in carb, I moved one to the kitchen for a week then put it in the fridge for a couple days. It made a big difference. I'm still conditioning right now. I'll test another one this weekend to see if a they are ready.

Another thing to keep in mind, a stout traditionally has a lower carb level than a pale ale. I used Screwy's priming calculator to get my numbers. So mine should be less carbed than a pale ale.

EDIT - Oh, and one other thing, I batch primed mine, so I can't help much on your measurements for a 16 oz bottle.

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Stouts can take a little longer to carb than some beers. It could also be a product of the yeast. The fromunda should not have an issue, but if any of you replaced it with the Safale S-04 it can sometimes take a bit of extra time to carb up.

As for the amount of corn sugar to use for a 16oz bottle, it all depends on what you are trying to accomplish. 1/2 tsp per bottle will get you roughly 2.0 CO2 volumes, which is right in line with many stouts. It would be a bit under-carbed for some styles, though. A full tsp would put you somewhere around 3.0 CO2 volumes, which is VERY high for a stout.

So, to answer SteveT's question, 1/2 tsp should have been plenty to stick with the style. 2 days probably isn't enough to notice much carbonation when your target CO2 volume is so low. If after a week or so they still aren't firming up, I still wouldn't be too worried. 2 or 3 weeks out...you could have a problem.

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I fermented @ a range of 68-72 degrees although we had a couple of cool nights which is why I let it go another 3 days.

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And speaking of corn sugar...are we referring to liguid (such as Karo) or granulated corn sugar. I ask b/c I've searched high and low for granulated corn sugar and can't find it in any grocery store here.

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The corn sugar I use is more like a fine powder. Got it at my Local brew store.

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