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razz

How big of a mistake is this

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Hey guys first post and first time home brewer. Well I think I messed up already. I bought the gold kit which uses the booster. As I was dissolving it into the water it took longer than I expected and I kind of became side tracked and forgot to boil it before adding the malt. I wanted to just pour it out right there but I decided to put it into the keg. Its now been 17 days and the brew is still not clear in fact it's pretty cloudy. So how necessary was it to boil the booster? I was hoping that it didn't need to be boiled to turn it into sugar and everything would work out. Should I just pour it down the sink? Any input would be appreciated.

Thanks,
John

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First of all, welcome aboard, John. Let's not be too quick to dump that brew down the drain just yet. Boiling is not a requirement at all for the booster. It dissolves fine without boiling. I like to start mine in barely warm water and slowly bring up the temp while it dissolves. I find it clumps up less that way. I'm sure there's other ways, too. Don't want to get too far ahead, but I think the yeast would find that sugar even if it was still in clumps.

Would you tell us exactly what you put into your brew and describe how you went about it? That will help to figure out what is going on with your batch.

To tell you the truth, the cloudiness may be perfectly normal. Some cloudiness settles out while the bottles of beer are conditioning at room temperature as well as when they're in the fridge after that.

Some people like to "cold crash" the LBK before bottling. This helps with the cloudiness also. I have stopped doing that and my beers clear up pretty good in the bottles, anyway.

Well, tell us all you can about this batch. You may have nothing at all to worry about.

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thanks for the reply. I was under the impression that the booster needed to be boiled in order for the starches to be converted into sugars so this is good to hear that it is not necessary.

I followed the directions exactly as instructed in the kit except for the boiling part. The cowboy lager is the beer I am brewing. It is very cloudy and kind of reminds me of orange juice except with less orange and more of a light brown color. Could the problem be the yeast? It is very old the kit was given as gift last Christmas(two Christmas' ago).

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Check to see if the fermentation is complete. You know, draw some off and taste. If it taste like flat beer, and no cidery flavor, fermentation is complete. If so I would put the LBK in the fridge for about five days and then bottle.

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razz...as was said, there likely isn't a problem at all. Your beer being cloudy when you draw a sample from the LBK is perfectly normal. The trub (sediment that settles at the bottom) is typically right near the spigot and you can get some of it in the small amount you draw off, which will make it quite cloudy.

Like Brooster said, take a sample, taste it, and if it tastes like flat, warm beer, its time to bottle.

As for not boiling the booster, the main reason for doing this is to kill any potential bacteria that might be in the package, but it really should be an issue with the Mr Beer booster since I'm sure they are pretty sanitary when they package their stuff.

NEVER dump a batch of beer unless you are absolutely certain it is infected.

Bottle it up, leave it at room temperature for 3 or 4 weeks, then pop one in the fridge for a couple days before you drink it. Report back to us with the results. My guess is that you made beer!! Congratulations and welcome aboard!!

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The boiling step isn't to dissolve the Booster or change starches into sugars, it's to kill off any wild yeasts, bacteria, etc. The Booster is very dry and hostile to microbes, and the HME is also too dense to support microbial activity (plus, the HME has been sealed in a can, so it should be fine). There could be dormant microbes sitting in the Booster, though, so that's why we boil it.

You've got an increased risk of an infection, but there's a good chance you're okay. Even many infections don't make a beer undrinkable (although some do; if you have one of those, you'll know in a hurry).

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My first batches (Classic American Blonde and Cowboy Golden) were cloudy, even after fermenting for 3 weeks. As suggested you can cold crash the LBK in the fridge for a few days before bottling to help clear it up. Mine cleared up a lot while conditioning in the bottles.

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Guest

Welcome to the Forum!

Don't worry, u have beer. The yeasties will find and eat all that booster, even if not totally disolved. Booster is primarily sugar, so nuttin to convert. Like previously said, if taste like flat booze, bottle it, if sweet, give it another couple days. Also, don't worry about the cloudyness, it will get better as it conditions. I like to let mine sit in the fridge for atleast 2 weeks after all of the carbing and bottle conditioning is done. This clears it up real nice, and makes the bottle trub stick well to the bottom. I drink from the bottle all the time and the trub rarely mixes back in, BUT, most my bottles sit in the fridge for 4 weeks first. Well, the did before my pipeline died, may it rest in peace! LOL

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thanks for the answers. I'll let you know how it turns out

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One last suggestion - you can tilt the LBK (little brown keg) back a bit to get the trub to settle away from the spigot. I use a CD case under the front end of the LBK and it works great.
Oh yeah...... WELCOME!

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