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kenjsmith

Black and Tan Suggestions

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Good Day,
I'm fairly new to the MR Beer and so far I'm enjoying the experience.
I have already completed 3 standard recipes (WCPA, Canadian Draft & Blonde) and have American Devil IPA conditioning, and fermenting 1776(even boiled the hops) and Blue Lightning.

I would like to brew two batches at once to give me the ability to make a classic black and tan. I enjoy the classic Guinness Stout on top and Bass Pale Ale on bottom.

I'm looking for suggestions on what 2 refills or recipes I should do to emulate each for good classic black and tan.

Please Note: I'm not looking for a Guinness or Bass clone.
I'm trying to understand the best 'MR BEER version' stout and Ale to use.

Thanks!

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center kenjsmith. You will be Assimilated. Resisstance is quite futile: we have beer.

I tried doing that a few years ago... wasn't able to actually keep them seperated. So, best of luck to you. Maybe someone else will chime in with that information.

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For the stout try either Sticky Wicket or Blarney Stone Irish Stout. For the Ale Elkhorn Point Ale is about as close to an English style Pale ale you can get using Mr Beer. It's not spot on but should work! Good Luck and post some pics with that first pour!!

BTW: Welcome to the BORG!!!

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In order to keep them separated I've heard you would have to use nitrogen carbonation as is normally used in the stout

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Guest

Welcome to the forum!

Have never did or had one, cann't help ya on that one.

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"JonEleven" post=254603 said:

In order to keep them separated I've heard you would have to use nitrogen carbonation as is normally used in the stout

Nah... nitrogen isn't necessary. It might help, but it's not necessary.

But the beer at the bottom has to have finished with a higher FG then the beer that you want to stay on top. IE you can make a reverse black and tan if you mix Guiness extra with bodingtons instead of say pub draft with bass. IE guiness extra = tan top, black bottom... where pub draft = tan bottom, black top.

You want to pour the heavy beer first, and then the lighter bodied beer on top, using a spoon or some other device to help distribute the pour more evenly across the surface instead of as a stream directly into the beer.

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"JonEleven" post=254603 said:

In order to keep them separated I've heard you would have to use nitrogen carbonation as is normally used in the stout


This was the same thought I had, unless someone knows otherwise. I think it is because the nitrogen is less dense than CO2 allowing the Guiness to float atop the pale ale.

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"mashani" post=254630 said:

"JonEleven" post=254603 said:

In order to keep them separated I've heard you would have to use nitrogen carbonation as is normally used in the stout

Nah... nitrogen isn't necessary. It might help, but it's not necessary.

But the beer at the bottom has to have finished with a higher FG then the beer that you want to stay on top. IE you can make a reverse black and tan if you mix Guiness extra with bodingtons instead of say pub draft with bass. IE guiness extra = tan top, black bottom... where pub draft = tan bottom, black top.

You want to pour the heavy beer first, and then the lighter bodied beer on top, using a spoon or some other device to help distribute the pour more evenly across the surface instead of as a stream directly into the beer.


So the pale ale has a higher FG than Guiness? I thought stouts usually have a higher FG, resulting in more body.

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Traditional black and tans are *real* guiness - which is not Extra Stout, it's the light bodied low alcahol pub draft kind. It's much lighter in body then bass pale ale. It's just barely over 4% ABV or so, and it starts off at only around 1.04 OG. Really. It's very quaffable, it's not a thick/chewy heavy bodied beer. People have a mistaken belief that the nitrogen is what lightens pub guiness - and it does affect how it feels in your mouth by giving it tiny bubbles - but the fact is that it's basically a dark flavorful lawnmower beer in the first place.

Bass Pale ale, it's traditional counterpart is 5% ABV.

If you try to pour a black and tan using Guiness Extra Stout (which is a *totally different beer* then draft Guiness) on top it doesn't work. Extra stout will sink.

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"mashani" post=254685 said:

Traditional black and tans are *real* guiness - which is not Extra Stout, it's the light bodied low alcahol pub draft kind. It's much lighter in body then bass pale ale. It's just barely over 4% ABV or so, and it starts off at only around 1.04 OG. Really. It's very quaffable, it's not a thick/chewy heavy bodied beer. People have a mistaken belief that the nitrogen is what lightens pub guiness - and it does affect how it feels in your mouth by giving it tiny bubbles - but the fact is that it's basically a dark flavorful lawnmower beer in the first place.

Bass Pale ale, it's traditional counterpart is 5% ABV.

If you try to pour a black and tan using Guiness Extra Stout (which is a *totally different beer* then draft Guiness) on top it doesn't work. Extra stout will sink.


Ah, I didn't realize which Guiness you used mattered (honestly, I didn't realize that Guiness Draught was only 4ish ABV). That makes a ton of sense. Thanks mashani!

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"mashani" post=254685 said:

Traditional black and tans are *real* guiness - which is not Extra Stout, it's the light bodied low alcahol pub draft kind. It's much lighter in body then bass pale ale. It's just barely over 4% ABV or so, and it starts off at only around 1.04 OG. Really. It's very quaffable, it's not a thick/chewy heavy bodied beer. People have a mistaken belief that the nitrogen is what lightens pub guiness - and it does affect how it feels in your mouth by giving it tiny bubbles - but the fact is that it's basically a dark flavorful lawnmower beer in the first place.

Bass Pale ale, it's traditional counterpart is 5% ABV.

If you try to pour a black and tan using Guiness Extra Stout (which is a *totally different beer* then draft Guiness) on top it doesn't work. Extra stout will sink.

+1 Nice reply. People always look at my weird when I tell them my go-to light beer is Guinness. Less than 100 calories, IIRC. And when I made my dry stout people kept asking me why it wasn't thick and heavy "like real Guinness".

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Thanks for your input. I will give it try and post a pick. If it doesn't stay split, no biggy, I'm sure it will still taste good together.

Mashani, thanks for the additional explination as to why it does what it does.
Funny as I did try the extra stout recently and it sank.... wasnt sure why.. still good.

:borg: I'm in!

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