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mzweier

Question about Conditioning

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I am just getting started brewing my own beer and am excited to learn more about the craft. I was wondering what the difference is in flavor bewteen warm and cold conditioning? I just started fermentation of the American Devil IPA and don't know which would be the best option. Any suggestions would be great! Thank you.

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It all depends on the yeast used. Most likely you'll be brewing ales first. Ale yeast likes to be "warm" conditioned, which is usually between 62-68*F.

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Lagers are cold conditioned using bottom fermenting yeast, while Ales are warm conditioned using top fermenting yeast. All of Mr.B's kits are warm fermented Ales. For your IPA, I'm assuming you used the Mr. B. Fromunda yeast (From 'unda' the lid). This yeast ferments at a recommended temperature of 68°-76°F. I've fermented it at 64-65 and it was just fine. Most brewers recommend keeping it on the lower end of a yeast's range.

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Thank you for your help. I did use the yeast that came with the HME. I am new to home brewing and just want to make sure I get the most flavor out of my beer. I am learning alot from the MR.B forum.

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In my opinion, there are advantages to both warm and cold conditioning, even with an ale.

Warm conditioning is good to get carbonation done and to let the yeasts do some cleanup work in a somewhat active state.

Ale yeasts are much less active as they get cooler, but will continue to do something until they get down to about 40F or so. So they'll continue to do some cleanup (albeit very slowly). But there are other things that change at lower temperatures that aren't related to yeast activity. More solids drop out of suspension at cooler temperatures, the trub compacts more, some of the flavors blend together better, CO2 gets absorbed by the liquid better, and so on.

I used to think that once the beer went into the fridge, all activity stopped and there was no real benefit to keeping the beer in the fridge longer than it takes for it to get cold enough to drink. Then I was out of town for a week and discovered that my beer that spent more time in the fridge tasted much better, so I started extending the fridge time.

I try for a fairly long (several month) warm conditioning period, followed by a cold conditioning period of about 2 weeks. When I open a beer, I can almost always pour the entire beer into the glass without getting any trub at all.

I think that if I had more fridge space, I'd try for an even longer cold conditioning period.

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Great dissertation, Brian. Very useful information from someone who has practical application going for him.

:barman:

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"FedoraDave" post=257690 said:

Great dissertation, Brian. Very useful information from someone who has practical application going for him.

:barman:

Well, sure, it's easy to make sense when you know what you're talking about. What about us poor fellows who have to try to sound sensible when we hardly ever know what we're talking about? Now that takes some real fancy footwork right there.

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"bpgreen" post=257601 said:

In my opinion, there are advantages to both warm and cold conditioning, even with an ale.

Warm conditioning is good to get carbonation done and to let the yeasts do some cleanup work in a somewhat active state.

Ale yeasts are much less active as they get cooler, but will continue to do something until they get down to about 40F or so. So they'll continue to do some cleanup (albeit very slowly). But there are other things that change at lower temperatures that aren't related to yeast activity. More solids drop out of suspension at cooler temperatures, the trub compacts more, some of the flavors blend together better, CO2 gets absorbed by the liquid better, and so on.

I used to think that once the beer went into the fridge, all activity stopped and there was no real benefit to keeping the beer in the fridge longer than it takes for it to get cold enough to drink. Then I was out of town for a week and discovered that my beer that spent more time in the fridge tasted much better, so I started extending the fridge time.

I try for a fairly long (several month) warm conditioning period, followed by a cold conditioning period of about 2 weeks. When I open a beer, I can almost always pour the entire beer into the glass without getting any trub at all.

I think that if I had more fridge space, I'd try for an even longer cold conditioning period.


Except for PA's and IPA's which are best when young...IMHO.

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I've only been using the fromunda yeast but I've had vey good success using a 4-5 week warm condition followed by a 2-3 week cold condition.. I am trying to build a better pipeline but I need to buy a few more LBKs or a 5 gallon set-up.LHBS has for $77 . I need to do a side job or two !!!

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