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Ossian666

Cider Not Carbing

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I did a cider using Nong's pumpkin spice recipe and it has been about 2 weeks and i tested one just to see how it came out and there is no carb. I carbed using half the amount suggested and used booster.

Is this normal of Cider or should I be concerned?

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For what it is worth, my Mr B traditional cider took 3 weeks in the bottle to carb. And that was the full recommended amount for priming (table sugar). So now, the plastic bottles are hard of you squeeze them, but the cider is barely fizzy and has no foam or head at all when you pour it.

I've made 4 batches of beer do far and this is the only carb'ing issue I've had. So maybe cider just does't work that way? I don't know, just adding my 2 cents. :-)

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Guest System Admin

What yeast did you use?

Also what was your gravities and ABV?

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I used Champaign Yeast. Can't remember the brand off hand I think it was Red Star.

ABV is 7.7.

OG was 1.059
FG was 1.000

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Guest System Admin

Strange, I was going to say if you used Ale yeast and were high ABV maybe the yeast did all it could, but Champagne yeast can go quite high.

What temps have you been conditioning the cider? Champange likes warmer temps.

Only good thing is a lot of people like ciders more still :)

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I just had a similar thing happen to me. Slightly different but similar circumstances. I had a couple of 2 gallon batches of wine that I moved into one gallon jugs for a secondary fermentation. I was surprised to find that the hydrometer reading went from OG of 1.090 to FG of 1.000. It had used up all of the sugars, down to the bone.

I siphoned it to the new containers and dumped all the sediment from the old containers. Added some sugar and nutrient to jump start the yeast again. That was almost 2 days ago, and still nothing, nada, squat.

I'm beginning to think that after all the food was gone, the yeast all dropped to the bottom and I inadvertently dumped any remaining yeast, inactive, active, or otherwise. If the hydrometer reading was a little higher, then the yeast would still be in an active state and suspended in the wine, is my theory now. After sitting there with no food for who knows how long, it just dropped down to the bottom, I believe. I mean, why would it be suspended in the liquid if the liquid was "sterile" of food.

So now I figure I have to just go get another packet of yeast and re-pitch. If I had taken some of the dormant yeast that had all settled down to the bottom and added it to the secondary, I believe that would have worked. But I already dumped it all, figuring there was enough yeast suspended in the wine already. But I've never tried to carb or start a secondary fermentation on anything with such a low gravity that there was basically no sugar whatsoever in the liquid I was working with.

If this theory is correct, then the same thing might have happened with your cider. Once it went down to 1.000, and perhaps stayed there for a few days, the yeast may have drifted to the bottom. Maybe there just wasn't enough left in suspension to kick-start your carbonation.

Hopefully someone here has enough experience to either validate or refute this theory.

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Yea I have been holding it at around 72*.

Maybe it did drop into total suspension...which would suck because there is NO WAY I am dumping it all out to repitch and rebottle lol

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"Ossian666" post=264300 said:

I used Champaign Yeast. Can't remember the brand off hand I think it was Red Star.

ABV is 7.7.

OG was 1.059
FG was 1.000


Champagne yeast, contrary to what you'd expect, does not carbonate.

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For a NONG CIDER, that is a pretty low ABV. I normally get about 10.5~12.5%
I don't try to carb my ciders. If I do, I use Co2. When I was using Sugar priming to carb the ciders, I'd get zero carb or explosive carb. I couldn't find a happy medium.
[reminds me... I've got to keg the next Nong PPS Cider I do for SWMBO].

I agree with the therory about the yeast just falling out. I think if you want to carb with champagne yeast, you'll have to bottle while it still has active gravity. With Champagne yeast, I'd shoot for a 5~10gravity reading...at just under 2 weeks I think. this isn't an area I've played with alot, as the wife doesn't mind the noncarbed version... and speaking of.. I've got to do another orange nong cider...summer time and all that you know...

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Hmm that stinks. Oh well no carb for me then.

(I took some sugar out of the recipe to make it more for the ladies)

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We recently made our first cider--it was the red tart cherry cider with the champagne yeast. We left it in the fermenter for 2 weeks and then bottled with the regular priming sugar. It sat there for a week or so doing nothing. Then we put bottles of hot tap water into the cooler where we had the bottles to bring the temps up into the low 80's. I believe that champagne yeast is not active below 76 degrees. We kept it warm for 2 weeks and it eventually carbed. Not as well as beer, but it is carbonated. So, I would recommend getting it warmer. 72 is way too low. We change our hot tap water gallon jugs (we use 1 or 2 depending on temps we are reading) twice a day and keep an eye on a thermometer that we have in the cooler. Try this and see if it helps. But I think you would need the full priming sugar amount. I have never carbed with booster so don't know how that works.

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"KZ" post=264357 said:

"Ossian666" post=264300 said:

I used Champaign Yeast. Can't remember the brand off hand I think it was Red Star.

ABV is 7.7.

OG was 1.059
FG was 1.000


Champagne yeast, contrary to what you'd expect, does not carbonate.

Yes it will, as long as it has something to ferment that it likes to eat (edit: maltose is not one of those things though).

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"mashani" post=264402 said:

"KZ" post=264357 said:

"Ossian666" post=264300 said:

I used Champaign Yeast. Can't remember the brand off hand I think it was Red Star.

ABV is 7.7.

OG was 1.059
FG was 1.000


Champagne yeast, contrary to what you'd expect, does not carbonate.

Yes it will, as long as it has something to ferment that it likes to eat (edit: maltose is not one of those things though).

What I've read has recommended it not be used in sparkling wine, and in my experience I've found it not to carbonate. Maybe if treated properly or per YD not allowed to ferment to terminal gravity?

Cheers!

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I let it sit in the fermenter for 4 weeks because I was afraid to take it out prior to meeting FG. I didn't need a ton of bottles exploding in my house.

That makes me rethink how I do my Hard Limeade drinks I have fermenting...may need to pull those early and toss a tad more yeast prior to bottling.

Fruit drinks are tricky!

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You said you were holding the carb temp at 72. That is too cold for champagne yeast. It is not active at that temp. That is an ale yeast temp. Get the temp of the bottles up to 80 and leave them there for 3 weeks. Not over 83 though because that would be too high. If you can't get the temp higher then I suggest brewing with ale yeast next time.

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"Ossian666" post=264674 said:

I let it sit in the fermenter for 4 weeks because I was afraid to take it out prior to meeting FG. I didn't need a ton of bottles exploding in my house.

That makes me rethink how I do my Hard Limeade drinks I have fermenting...may need to pull those early and toss a tad more yeast prior to bottling.

Fruit drinks are tricky!

Yes, they can be tricky. I left mine in fermenter too long also, about 3.5 weeks, definitely not intentionally, but because I was sidetracked. The whole time I was worried because I knew If I wanted sparkling wine I needed to catch it while it still had some gravity and yeast activity. Well, it went all still on me, and now I have to restart it and catch it in time this time. No big deal. Things happen. If I was you, and I wanted sparkling cider, I would roll up my sleeves and keep working it. Never say die. Well, almost never.

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