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Brousenhaus

First two batches brewed hot - advice?

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Hi Everyone!
So, my first batch, Witty Monk Witbier, has been in the bottle for three weeks. My second batch, Rose's Red, is one and a half weeks in the LBK. To tell the truth, I'm still setting up how I want to brew and bought an indoor thermometer this week. I didn't realize that our apartment was so hot! The range is between 75 and 81F! We're on the third floor and get a lot of sun. I've checked the basement (storage area...small cage) and it has been consistently 73F for two days, so I'm now setting up to brew there. But, is there hope for the first two batches? I tried the witbier at one, two and three weeks after bottling and it has improved over that time. But, it still isn't great. So, my questions are: Do I dump them? Do I condition longer to try to save them? How long to I try for? Any other advice?
Thanks a bunch for all the help!

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Do not... I say again...Do not dump those beers...unless it's in a nice drinking glass, and then, that's ok. Let the beers stay in the bottles for about 6 weeks, then, place them in the fridge a week prior to drinking (each, that is). I have had cases (in numerical count and situations) where the beer has fermented in warmer situations. You'll live, and so will the beer.
But, by all means, move the future beers down there... as well as the present beers for "lagering" at 73. That's a good temp for that. I think you have found your "beer seller".

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It takes temps of upwards in the 90-100* range to KILL yeast. Having higher temps may cause some stress and some off flavors/less clarity, but in the end its STILL BEER! Don't dump it. Let it ferment for 2 weeks, then bottle and let it condition 4. I am sure it will be fine. This is all a learning experience so do some searching/digging around on some forums and you will find LOTS of stuff that works!

If you are concerned that the temps will be higher and you don't have room to work with then check out Wyeast's Belgian Saison yeast. Its designed to work at higher temps (prefers 75-90).

Edit: Ninja'd!

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Guest System Admin

My first batch I pitched the yeast way too hot (almost 80*F) and fermented at low-mid 70's for two weeks and bottled.

It took 8weeks for the beer to really taste good and by the 16th week when I drank the last one it was a darn good beer.

Never pour it unless it is infected and you will know since it will make you want to hurl just putting it in your mouth.

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I won't repeat what has already been said. I will throw out a quick suggestion for cheap temp control though, assuming you have the space. Get a cheap styrofoam ice chest and some plastic water/soda/juice bottles to freeze water in. It's very lo-tech, but it works really well. My house is in the hi-70s lo-80s now, but my beer is at a relatively stable 64. Just watch the temp ,and circulate fresh frozen bottles as needed. The ideal temp depending on the yeast you're using of course.

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Thanks smgarrett and Trollby! I'll follow your advice on the current beers and move into the basement from here on.

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"Ossian666" post=264347 said:


If you are concerned that the temps will be higher and you don't have room to work with then check out Wyeast's Belgian Saison yeast. Its designed to work at higher temps (prefers 75-90).

Today I placed a batch into the refrigerator for the cold crash. I used that Belgian Saison yeast. Interestingly enough, my ambient temps never reached as high as I thought they would for this time of year. It stayed around 72-73 degrees throughout, and took 4 weeks in the LBK before it was time for the cold crash. First time I've had to go longer than 3 weeks.


Rick

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"rickbray66" post=264374 said:

"Ossian666" post=264347 said:


If you are concerned that the temps will be higher and you don't have room to work with then check out Wyeast's Belgian Saison yeast. Its designed to work at higher temps (prefers 75-90).

Today I placed a batch into the refrigerator for the cold crash. I used that Belgian Saison yeast. Interestingly enough, my ambient temps never reached as high as I thought they would for this time of year. It stayed around 72-73 degrees throughout, and took 4 weeks in the LBK before it was time for the cold crash. First time I've had to go longer than 3 weeks.


Rick

Its the yeast I use for FD's White Panama. It works great for the warm temps in Cleveland.

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Thanks again for all the help everyone! I brewed the Czech Pilsner on Saturday and placed it in the basement (68-70F lately). It bubbled slowly this time and built up a nice krausen. Noticeable bubbling stopped after about a day, but the krausen is thick and hanging around! I think it will be a good beer this time! :gulp:

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