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snakefetus

Cold Crashing

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I just put my LBK in the fridge with intentions on bottling tomorrow or the next day. I took a taste sample today and the beer was pretty cloudy and there are alot of 'floaties' in the beer.

My question is tomorrow or the next day, when I bottle do i take the LBK out of the fridge and let it sit for a few hours to get it to room temp before I bottle? I am carbonating naturally.

The Beer is a Cowboy Golden Lager.

Also I noticed when I moved the LBK that there was a layer of floating what I hope is yeast on the top of the beer, alot more than I have seen in the previous 4-5 batches I made...does this sound normal?

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Bottle right from the fridge and try to give it that extra day. I don't think I'd be concerned about floaties but taste the beer. Make sure it tastes like beer and not sweet, which would mean fermentation may not be complete. Provided it tastes like beer, go for it. (I assume you did not do the gravity thing.)

You made a lager....did you ferment it cold? What kind of yeast did you use?

and how long did you ferment?

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Well its the Mr.Beer Cowboy Lager, I fermented at about 68 degrees.
I tasted the beer and it tasted fine, perhaps a little 'stringy' if that makes any sense, lol. I just used the MrB yeast.

I also let it ferment for 2 weeks

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well you sort of made a lager and I guess sort of made an ale. Stringy I understand but I wouldn't fret over that. If it tastes like beer, 2 weeks should be fine, I would bottle and good luck!

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+1 to what Fee said. I cold crash my brews for a minimum of 48 hours. I've had a couple go a little bit longer, but not much more than that. I don't pull the LBK out of the refrigerator until I'm ready to attach the bottle wand and start filling the bottles.


Rick

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I found that the first beer out of the LBK can be cloudier even if you tilt the LBK while cold crashing. Especially with some of the yeasts that produce more trub. I usually run a few ounces into a glass and either pitch it or drink it and then draw a little more to see if it's cleared up.

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What are the :borg: 's general feelings on Cold Crashing? Is it an accepted practice, a required practice, or a frowned upon practice?

Thx

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yes, no and no. it is really brewer's choice. i used to swear by it, but i've gotten lazy and honestly, unless i'm dry hopping the crap out of it commando, i don't bother anymore.

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My view on it is that if the beer looks cloudy and I have time to cold crash, why not do it. I cold crashed my last IIPA but didn't cold crash my last stout because the stout looked pretty clear and the IIPA was cloudy. It's easy and I don't think it can hurt anything as long as fermentation is complete.

Keep in mind that I'm new to this and am only on my 4th batch.

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Now if I was planning on batch priming, would I need to bring the sugar solution's temperature down to around the same as the beer? or can I just get it to room temp and then rack the cold crashed beer on top

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I've never had any great success with cold crashing the lbk, and I'm not to concerned about clear beer. I think if you're concerned about the clarity of your brew you should be racking to a secondary and than cold crash that...my .02

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I tend to cold crash, except when I don't. I get beer either way... :cheers:

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Guest System Admin

@snakefetus No need to worry what the temp. of the batch priming solution is.
I always have less than 1/2 cup of water/sugar solution. Even if it is still 100F its such a small amount, I just pour it in, give a stir. It works great. I don't even get out my thermometer on bottling day.

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Try to bottle from the fridge, or move LBK gingerly.

moving LBK may stir up za Trub.

Or not... :barman:

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"Fee" post=265865 said:

well you sort of made a lager and I guess sort of made an ale.

Just to be a little anal, I guess I'm missing how this is a lager. He used Mr. B fromunda at 68 degrees. In order to be a lager, he would have needed to use a lager yeast and ferment at 50 or so. Mr. B is misleading in using the word 'lager' in their HME and recipe names. I'm disappointed to see that they continued that practice with their new HMEs. As a beer company, they should be more accurate IMHO.

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swenocha, I'm sure you are correct. I do not know to what extent MRB's "Lager" LME or HME is designed to be brewed as a lager and only as a lager. The rest of what he did....process/recipe, does all say "ale".

As far as cold crashing, I found that it settles the yeast cake more, keeps it more separate from the liquid on top of it, and bottles a bit cleaner with less trub coming up.

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I cold crash but, put a 2x4 bloch under the LBK to keep it upright a little...Keeps the yeasties down the LBK

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