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otterzone

West Coast IPA w/ cherries, blueberries, brown sug

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So I go to brew my first batch of beer and the booster is a solid block of sugar. I was going to use white sugar instead but only had a cup so I used a cup of brown sugar also. Then, since I had already strayed I went ahead and pitted some fresh cherries and cut up some fresh blue berries and through those in.

Any thoughts about what I might get out? How long should I let it brew and condition?

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First off welcome aboard!

Now as for you brew........

Booster IS NOT all sugar, they add non-fermentables to simulate all malt. Switching all sugar instead of booster will make a cidery tasting beer .

Did you sanitize the berries, cutting board and knife? (If not hope you did not introduce some nasty germs)

If your just starting out and not familiar with the flavors it is better to try and see what you have before going mad scientist.

Read the sticky post about brewing here in new brewer section for more info.

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I would brew for 3 weeks and condition for 3 months at the same temps.

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Otter (by the way nice outfit and welcome), you may simply have too many adjuncts (fruit and sugar). Are you using one can of extract? I don't know how much of all the rest you're using but if you read the MRB book it says that 2/3 of your fermentables should be malt. That leaves up to 1/3 for sugars and fruits.

So if you used 1 can then yes, you're going to want a lot of conditioning time to finish and clean up all that sugar. You may find it has a bit of a cidery taste even after 4 weeks. But if you made it right, time is your friend and what you taste after 6, 8, 10 weeks could really be good.

You will probably not use much booster in your future. I realized pretty quick that what I really want to boost alcohol is malts.

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Thanks for the insights! I will plan on taking my time with this,and hope for the best. I did sanitize everything and made sure the fruit was clean! On a positive not there wasn't that much fruit so I'm hoping the flavor will come around after a few weeks.

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How much fruit did you use and how much extract did you use?

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"Fee" post=266386 said:

How much fruit did you use and how much extract did you use?

I used about a cup of cherries and half cup of bluberies. 1 can of west coast IPA malt

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That's not a lot. It is just a bit high due to you only using one can of malt. With 2 cans of malt it may be able to handle the fruit a little more but no you didn't overdo it. You'll probably try one after a few weeks and you'll get that cidery/young/green kind of back taste that we all talk about.

Then you'll try one after 5 weeks. Then 8. And then you'll see.

Good luck!

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It's been fermenting 1 week? I would give it another week before bottling. It might be "ready" now but it really should go for 2 weeks. Then bottle it and see how long you can wait!

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It has been fermenting for 1 week. I was planning on waiting atleast another week before bottling. Is there anything I should "look" for to make sure it is ready to bottle?

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Sight is one of the least effective ways, and most would tell you that checking the gravity is the surest bet. But, you can assume, unless it's some big, heavy ingredient beer....that most beers will be "ready" after 2 weeks. There is nothing wrong with waiting 3 weeks if you want to make sure. There should be a solid layer of trub at the bottom and there should be hardly any bubbles....no action left.....

You may also want to consider the "cold crash"....put the LBK into the fridge for 2-3 days and let the trub settle and compact. It may make the beer clearer, and will most likely make bottling smoother.

Taste it! It should not have sweetness. It should taste like flat beer. If the sweetness is gone, bottle it!

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So this recipe is a winner! The beer tastes fantastic. This will be something I repeat as if I had purchased this beer at a store I would hurry back to get more. I guess I was very lucky with my experiment.

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wait until you see how the next few weeks do. Try continuing to condition some and also slowly rotate some into the fridge.....it also seems to improve with a few days in the fridge.

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