Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Fee

DME carbing

Recommended Posts

I'm going to experiment using DME to carb half of the stout I'm making. I have not used DME for this but my gut tells me it might be the highest quality way to carb.

Besides the change in amounts needed, from sugar, is there any other advice on how to go about doing this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

You need to find out what is the ferment-ability of the DME your going to use. (from 55% - 75%)

Then use the priming calc to prime

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ah....not all DME is the same for carbing hunh? I would imagine that the darkness has an impact on that but I've also learned that color does not have to do with fermentability.

I don't think that number appears anywhere on the packages of DME I've purchased....I assume I can find that online?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the one I plan on using.

Thank you!!

What about process? I assume nothing else changes but the quantity, but I don't know for sure....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't help you w/ that. Only ever used sucrose and dextrose. For batch priming, I'd assume you would need to dissolve in 1/2 to 1 cup of water, boil to sterilize, then prime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard of people adding a little yeast too, creating a bigger secondary ferment in the bottles but......I'm not playing with that one yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Fee" post=267644 said:

I've heard of people adding a little yeast too, creating a bigger secondary ferment in the bottles but......I'm not playing with that one yet.

That might risk some bottle bombs. I've not primed with DME, so that's just speculation on my part, but the red flag went up.

I started with honey to prime, and I've moved to Booster (because I bought a few bags of Booster when I first started, and now I'm not gonna brew with them, but want to use them). When the Booster runs out, I'll probably switch to either table sugar or corn sugar. But I may give DME a try just to see if it makes any kind of difference. Frankly, I don't notice any difference between the honey-primed beers and the Booster-primed ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I would not add any yeast, there is enough sleep'n in the brew to do the job just fine. I have bottle primed with DME a couple times and have not seen any difference than using table sugar. I would not hesitate to use DME for priming if I had no sugar. Sugar is just easier to mess with, no sticky counters when done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Priming with DME will take some dialing in based on the type of DME you choose. Similar to priming with honey or wort there is no set fermentable sugar content so you have to guesstimate how much to use at first.

I use pure cane sugar myself and always have but corn sugar has a set fermentable rating too making either one easier to calculate how much to use to get the right carbonation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Screwy Brewer" post=267698 said:

Priming with DME will take some dialing in based on the type of DME you choose. Similar to priming with honey or wort there is no set fermentable sugar content so you have to guesstimate how much to use at first.

I use pure cane sugar myself and always have but corn sugar has a set fermentable rating too making either one easier to calculate how much to use to get the right carbonation.

Excellent input. When I eventually switch to either corn or table sugar, I'll be sure to use your priming calculator. Thanks for doing all this advance work. Your website is a wealth of information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i brewed 5 gallons of classic american blonde with briess light dme, and it turned out great. 1/2 lb in the brew and 1/2 lbs to carb, although it did seem to take just a little longer to carb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've primed with cane sugar, corn sugar, honey and DME. From what I've experienced DME is the hardest to obtain a consistantly good carb. Older DME will not carb as well as fresh DME, so therefore it's really kinda hard to dial in. Afterall you don't really know how long that DME has been in the package. I brewed a Sam Smith clone twice and both times used DME. The first one was great perfect head loved it. The second one had hardly any carb at all.

I now use either corn sugar or cane sugar. Neither one has failed me yet and they always have given a consistent carb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok perhaps I will experiment with only 1/4 of the brew then just so I don't make too large a mistake. I am curious to try carbing with DME because I think that DME is the highest "quality" sugar. I won't add any yeast, that's just going to be filed in the back of my mind to try one day. I've heard that these two things can make a very fine bottle conditioning especially if you're going to try to age a larger beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...