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beerman88

longest beer can stay in a mr beer fermenter

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will the beer go bad or spoil if it was left in the fermenter for a period of 5-7 weeks before bottling?

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I don't know if it would spoil but it sure would pick up a lot of off flavors from the trub. If you must leave it in there longer than 3 weeks it is best to transfer it to a secondary to get it off of the trub.

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Guest

+1

when I go longer than 3 weeks, it is in the fridge. I've heard 4 weeks is not a problem, but I have not nor do I recommend pushing it. I have done 2 weeks in the fridge after 3 weeks at room temp and have not noticed anyproblems.

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FWIW, I have gone 5 one time without an issue, and 4 a couple of times without issue. But I would not recommend it unless you have no other choice.

When I went 5 it was due to circumstances out of my control. The 4 week beers were very high gravity due to multiple sugar feedings and simply were not done at 3 weeks.

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Welcome aboard The Obsession beerman88! If you're like the rest of us here you'll soon be awash in a sea of beer and setting sail on many great brewing adventures. There's lot's of information here and plenty of hands to help you get under way. You'll soon be producing some memorable beers and having a lot of fun too in the days ahead.

Navigate on over to our Advanced Brewing Techniques area of the forum and read over the

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

sticky. Yeast is a living cell, keep them healthy and they'll ferment you up some awesome tasting beers.

Set your course and sail on over to our New Brewers and FAQs area of the forum and read over the 'Malt To Adjunct Ratios' sticky.

Remember for the best tasting beer you'll want no less than 66% of the alcohol to come from malts and no more than 33% of the alcohol to come from sugars or other adjuncts.

I've never gone beyond 3 weeks myself but if I had to I would put the LBK in the refrigerator and cold crash it. Once the yeast go dormant there is little chance of them producing off flavors, but at fermenting temperatures they definitely will.

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"Screwy Brewer" post=270704 said:

Once the yeast go dormant there is little chance of them producing off flavors, but at fermenting temperatures they definitely will.

Not trying to be a jerk... we has homebrewers tend to throw out terms like "definitely" too often, and what we know "for sure" has often been proven incorrect repeatedly by experiements, or people just ignoring
"what we know" and actually tryign something new. IE "if you don't chill fast you get DMS" - except that no chill brewers do not get DMS.... or "HSA is a big problem"... but we now know that on homebrewer scale it's really not so much of one at all.

So, I would say more like "at fermentation temperatures you might have a problem".

Sure, some people have had off flavors they blame on this. Maybe they were caused by this... Maybe they just had infected beer and pushed the blame somewhere else... who knows.

But then again other people (includig myself) have gone longer by accident or on purpose and had NO off flavors. There are many variables, IE in a brewery with a tall or conical fermenter, there is huge amounts of pressure on the trub. But there isn't so much in an LBK, or even a bucket.

So, really YMMV.

Is it best practice to get it off the yeast cake in 3 weeks or less? Sure. Is it going to kill your beer for sure if you do not? I don't think so. It might... but probably you won't notice a thing.

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After 3 weeks fermenting, I have the LBK in the fridge for a long cold crash (about 1 week), it gets bottled tonight...

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"mashani" post=270774 said:


Not trying to be a jerk... we has homebrewers tend to throw out terms like "definitely" too often, and what we know "for sure" has often been proven incorrect repeatedly by experiements, or people just ignoring
"what we know" and actually tryign something new. IE "if you don't chill fast you get DMS" - except that no chill brewers do not get DMS.... or "HSA is a big problem"... but we now know that on homebrewer scale it's really not so much of one at all.

So, I would say more like "at fermentation temperatures you might have a problem".

Sure, some people have had off flavors they blame on this. Maybe they were caused by this... Maybe they just had infected beer and pushed the blame somewhere else... who knows.

But then again other people (includig myself) have gone longer by accident or on purpose and had NO off flavors. There are many variables, IE in a brewery with a tall or conical fermenter, there is huge amounts of pressure on the trub. But there isn't so much in an LBK, or even a bucket.

So, really YMMV.

Is it best practice to get it off the yeast cake in 3 weeks or less? Sure. Is it going to kill your beer for sure if you do not? I don't think so. It might... but probably you won't notice a thing.

Agreed. It's really not the temps that are a problem - it's the concern about autolysis which is caused by one of two things: excessive heat or excessive pressure.

As Mashani pointed out, there is very little (relative) pressure on the yeast cake that is in a LBK or a bucket due to the (relative) small amount of yeast being used.

Whether or not that yeast is in the fridge or at fermenting temp shouldn't make much of a difference as the pressure is the same. One could even argue that you create more pressure by cold crashing and sending more of the yeast to the bottom of the keg - or you could counter by saying the heat at room temps would cause more heat and pressure and would be more risky.

I've had beers in primary for up to 6 weeks with no issues at all. Was I lucky or is the notion of autolysis outdated because of the advancements in yeast and the small scale in which we brew? I dunno as I haven't experimented enough to be able to say.

I can tell you that plenty of people these days skip secondaries in favor of LONG primaries and don't have issues.

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