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SergeantScar

Just put the lid on my first attempt!

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Been lurking here for a couple days and figured i would start talking.

Just put my first batch in the fermenter and so far i think everything went well. hopefully in a few weeks i will be able to let everyone know what an awesome success it was! i decided to go by the book with the west coast pale ale that came with my kit.

hard part i think will be making sure the beer is fermenting at the right temperature.. i keep my house warm to save on cooling costs, so the only place below 76*F (default yeast temps said to keep between 68 and 76 i think) was in the basement, but i think it might be too cool down there.. i bought a little infrared thermometer gun to make sure the temp is within the right range tho.. hopefully everything goes well!

is it better to be on the high or low end of the yeast ideal temp range?

thanks.

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Almost always better to be on the low end of a yeasts working temperature range. You'll have a cleaner tasting, less estery beer. It may ferment a bit slower, but that is not a bad thing. Patience is a virtue when brewing. The Mr. Beer yeast should work just fine down to around 64*-65*. You're better fermenting at that temp than in the mid to high 70s, especially since the yeast will generate their own heat, and will ferment hotter than the ambient air temperature. With air temps in the high 70s, your beer temperature could be in the 80's, which can make for unhappy yeast, and produce fusel oils (a type of alcohol that tastes very strong and gives you headaches and hangovers).

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Welcome, SergeantScar! Oly pretty much covered the temperature and yeast issue. Always a safer bet, I think, to ferment at the lower end of a yeast's optimum range.

I commend you for not going Mad Scientist and adding a bunch of stuff to the recipe in an attempt to tweak or improve it. Right now, you're better off following the recipes so you get the process down, and so you know what the extracts bring to the table. You'll progress a lot faster if you take it slower at first. Sounds like a contradiction, but it's actually true.

And feel free to ask questions here. We're always ready and willing to lend some advice and point a new brewer in the right direction.

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Guest

Welcome to the forum!

I routinely ferment in the lower 60s with fromunder yeast (fromunder the lid). Like said, if u do, let it run 3 weeks for the yeasties to get the job/clean-up done.

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Welcome to the Borg! I always ferment at the lower range. Usually around 66 to 68 deg. You'll get a much cleaner tasting beer. Just make sure to let it ferment for 2-3 weeks and leave the bottles alone at the same temp for a min of 4 weeks.

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Good luck bro. I have my firt batch of WCPA going as well. People here have been very helpful to all my questions. :chug:

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Welcome! :chug:

Nothing else to add, brew and post often!

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Welcome to the Borg. Unless you are brewing Belgians or Saisons or Wheats, lower is better.

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Welcome! I'm only on my 4th and 5th batches, but my first was done hot (~80F) and it was not good. Too estery (fruity)! The good people here were and always are a great help! Enjoy the new adventure! :chug:

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Welcome!!

Oly did a great explanation. What Brosenhaus said is also very true...if you ferment at the higher end of the temps, that is where you are likely to get not only off-flavors, but also fruity-ish esters. Depending on the yeast...it could be fruity to pungent to down right rank.

One other thing that was briefly mentioned...I believe by FedoraDave...is that the yeast are a live entity only in itsy bitsy form. Luckily there are several billion of them working. And like anything that works, when it works, it tends to produce heat. So, if you have a temp strip and it reads 76...just be aware that the heat produced by several tens of billions of yeast cells working at once will possiby raise your inside temp to maybe 78 or somewhere close to that.

If you get it down closer to 68/69 (or a tad cooler)...the internal heat may raise it to 72 and you'll still be not too bad off.

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I have learned from several batches now that the lower the temp the better my beer tastes. I keep my kegs in my basement which has been about 64-66. Good luck!!!! You will become hooked.

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