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mjkatona

Second Batch: Lager

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7-8-2012
5:30pm
Bit of booster (not much, threw most away)
Boiled and removed from heat.
1 cupish Light brown sugar
2 Cans Vienna Lager
Half can coopers amber malt extract
OG before pitching yeast: 1.071 (assumed 80f reading)
Two packets yeast from Mr. Beer Vienna Lager pitched at 77f (I know, too hot)
Placed in cooler lower than 64f (need a new thermometer)

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Although the label says lager, if you're using he yeast from under the lid, it's an ale. How much below 64° is it? That yeast will work down to about 59°, but below 65°, is going to slow down quite a bit.

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Thanks Sir! I didn't realize it was still an Ale. I'll keep it around 65ish. I'll be honest, I expected to let it ferment, carb, and condition for about a month each.

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Not that it will hurt it, but 4 weeks in the primary is unnecessary IMHO. I would recommend getting a hydrometer so you can tell exactly when your brew is done fermenting (reached FG or gravity reading has remained the same for 2-3 consecutive days). All of my batches have taken about 2 weeks to finish fermenting (they were usually done by 2 weeks, but I didn't bottle until close to 3 due to laziness/lack of time).

Also I have had problems with fermenting at the lower end of 60* with the Mr Beer yeast (two packets pitched). I have had two batches where fermentation stopped midway because it was too cold, but it continued once the LBK was warmed up to upper 60*s. This may have just been what I experienced and not typical, but just to give you a heads up in case you experience the same thing!

Happy Brewing :cheers:

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Guest System Admin

Isn't anything more than 3 weeks going to risk oxygenation or is that a myth that the air lock folks propogate?

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=273564 said:

Isn't anything more than 3 weeks going to risk oxygenation or is that a myth that the air lock folks propogate?

Never heard that before. I've let several of my beers ferment up to a month and a few days give or take (due to me not being able to bottle it).. Never had any problems other than not getting to drink it sooner ;)

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The problem with letting the beer ferment over an extended period of time isn't the risk oxidation. Unless the beer is transferred to a secondary at some point, the beer sits on the yeast cake for an extended amount of time. The yeast cake is filled with dead yeast cells and fermentation byproducts. The longer the wort sits on the yeast cake, the greater the risk of the wort absorbing off flavors from the yeast cake.

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Guest System Admin

There's the answer I was looking for. Home Brew Forums people are always bashing people for leaving the beer in the LBK for more than 2 weeks (MAX). I knew the std in here was 3 weeks in the LBK for most people. Wondered why they were so adamant about it.

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I'm keeping the temp around 64/65ish in an large igloo cooler with a gallon of frozen water rotating when the jug start to get warm. I know the yeast is working because there is a bunch of foam on the top of the LBK.

Day two the cooler smelled of yeast when I opened to check the temp.

Days three of fermenting there this god awful mixed smell of yeast and something else. I didn't (or at least didn't remember) any pungent smells with the WCPA. I'll add that I when I did the WCPA it fermented in a smaller cooler on the patio during spring and now that it's summer I moved the cooler inside as we are in the TampaBay dog days of summer.

Thanks for the input guys, keep the knowledge flowing!

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7/14/2012
6 days in the LBK @ 60-64°
Sulfer smell starting to go away.
Second gravity readying @ 64° = 1.030
Color is darker than expected
Sip taste is good with hints of caramel

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Might suggest to not take so m any FG samples. Waste of beer :)

UNLESS you use a sanitized hydrometer and carefully pour back into the keg.

I would take a reading at 2 weeks. If it is close to the desired FG then bottle it.
I prefer just to wait 21 days. I bottle no matter what the FG is at that time. Most of my recipes are under 1.050 OG.

Good WAG of FG is, divide the OG decimal by 4. ex OG 1.040,, 040 divide by 4 = 010. Look for your FG reading in 2 weeks plus, to be close to 1.010. Done, bottle.

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Mj, I live in clearwater and have been using the cooler method since April. I have 2 16qt colemans and the LBK is a slightly tight fit, but , I find that a 1 qt juice bottle frozen will keep the temps between 60 and 74 for about 2 days . I keep my coolers in the garage also.

Joe

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It's been two weeks and FG is at 1.022 for the last three days. It's not as low as I wanted, but it will do.

So I'm bottling now with priming sugar. It sure does smell like flat beer, but it tastes a little like nail polish... I can't remember what my last batch tasted like when bottling.. Is this normal?

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Hmm... never tasted nail polish, so I can't help much there ;) . But I'm guessing you are saying to you have a chemical taste, which would indicate too-high ferm temps, but that doesn't seem to be the case here based on what you have presented. I would certainly bottle, condition at room temps for 3 weeks-ish or more, and then do some sample tastes. My beers generally taste a lot different at bottling than they do when done. If at that point you still have off-flavors, analyze the cause at that point.

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