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Screwy Brewer

Easy DIY Ale Pale Modification

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Recently my short lived love affair with the autosiphon came to an abrupt end once I discovered valves. Sounds screwy right, well read on and I will explain to you exactly what I mean.


The very fist 6.5 gallon plastic Ale Pail I bought was to be used as a fermentor and it had no 1 inch hole drilled in it for a valve, so I bought an auto siphon too in order to get the beer out of it. I soon found the longer auto siphon and tubing was a pain to use and a bit too challenging to clean, sanitize and store for my liking.

If you're interested in how I did mine then you can read the complete article here...Easy DIY Ale Pale Modification

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Great info screwy. But I must say, I love my auto siphon.
And, after less than a year, my tap on my siphon bucket finally started to leak so I have an order in for another one.
I'll keep this info handy for the day I may decide to switch things around.

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"russki" post=279044 said:

It's all fun and games until you have a 4" deep yeast cake!

What the hell you brewin' there russki?

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"Screwy Brewer" post=279049 said:

"russki" post=279044 said:

It's all fun and games until you have a 4" deep yeast cake!

What the hell you brewin' there russki?

That thar was my IPA with ~7 oz of hops in the boil... Woulda plugged that spigot like nobody's business.

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"russki" post=279059 said:

"Screwy Brewer" post=279049 said:

"russki" post=279044 said:

It's all fun and games until you have a 4" deep yeast cake!

What the hell you brewin' there russki?

That thar was my IPA with ~7 oz of hops in the boil... Woulda plugged that spigot like nobody's business.

Jeeezuz. What was the IBU on that monster?

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=279098 said:

"russki" post=279059 said:

"Screwy Brewer" post=279049 said:

"russki" post=279044 said:

It's all fun and games until you have a 4" deep yeast cake!

What the hell you brewin' there russki?

That thar was my IPA with ~7 oz of hops in the boil... Woulda plugged that spigot like nobody's business.

Jeeezuz. What was the IBU on that monster?

Around 80 or so, most were late hops. Screwy - sorry, didn't mean to hijack your thread...

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"russki" post=279099 said:

"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=279098 said:

"russki" post=279059 said:

"Screwy Brewer" post=279049 said:

"russki" post=279044 said:

It's all fun and games until you have a 4" deep yeast cake!

What the hell you brewin' there russki?

That thar was my IPA with ~7 oz of hops in the boil... Woulda plugged that spigot like nobody's business.

Jeeezuz. What was the IBU on that monster?

Around 80 or so, most were late hops. Screwy - sorry, didn't mean to hijack your thread...

russki, no problem. I just bag up my hops and pull them out of the kettle before cooling down my wort. Same goes for the dry hopping, bag 'em, sink 'em to the bottom and remove before transferring to bottling bucket. Doin' it my way there's never more than an inch of trub in the fermentor and mostly all of that is yeast cake. I like to clean up my beer as much as possible each time I transfer it.

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Been using bottling buckets to ferment in since I graduated to the ale pails. Although some of my BIAB's don’t settle all that well during the wort chill so I end up getting a pretty healthy dose of trub in the bucket. If that happens I transfer to glass carboy secondary to clear and then I have to use my auto syphon. But for all of my extract brew bottling buckets to ferment in are the way to go.

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Nice article Screwy. I've been thinking about doing this myself. But I haven't gotten too frustrated by the problem yet. In time probably.

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"drgnfli00" post=279272 said:

Been using bottling buckets to ferment in since I graduated to the ale pails. Although some of my BIAB's don’t settle all that well during the wort chill so I end up getting a pretty healthy dose of trub in the bucket. If that happens I transfer to glass carboy secondary to clear and then I have to use my auto syphon. But for all of my extract brew bottling buckets to ferment in are the way to go.

I found that by tossing in 1/2 Whirfloc tab 15 minutes before flameout and cooling down the wort as quickly as possible really helps clearing the wort before transferring it to the fermentor.


I just stir the cooling wort in the same direction every once in a while to keep the hotter wort in contact with the cooling coils and the second benefit is a nice compact trub pile in the center of the kettle. That makes it extremely easy to pour off clean wort, using the kettle valve or auto siphon, without transferring the cold break with it.

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Thanks for the info. I do use whirfloc or irish moss, and I do whirlpool with an immersion chiller. Our water is pretty cold even in the summer and I can get a 5 gal batch to pitching temp in under 30 min. Although I usually only swirl once so I will try to swirl a few more times. I also usually just dump (minus the trub) the cooled wort rather than siphoning it, and I can definitely see how dumping vs syphoning would make a diff.

My theory is that I am using a Corona mill and I am getting a lot more flour with my crush than with a barley crusher. With BIAB a fine crush isn’t really a problem, although I think it complicates getting a good cold break. It does eventually clear though, although at times I have to transfer to a secondary to get everything to settle out.

Thanks for the tips, I will try to swirl more and siphon with my next BIAB.

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