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Red IPA?

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Anyone ever try the Red IPA form Austin HB? I'm pretty sure I've never had a red IPA, at least, not knowingly. I got the kit as it was on special and figure I'd give it a try.
Might be a while before I get to it. Got too many things ahead.

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No, but I've had several imperial reds and they are very tasty (try Ballast Point Tongue Buckler if you can get it). I have one coming up a few batches from now. Let us know how the AHB one comes out.

Cheers!

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Good luck with the Red Ale. I tried one from TB, it was just alright. If I was to do another, I would make it for summertime. This is coming from a porter, stout kind of guy.

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I wanted to try something I've not tried before. I'm thinking of boosting the hops a bit but will wait until I see the recipe. Austin HB doesn't post those online.
Should be in soon.

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"KZ" post=279874 said:

No, but I've had several imperial reds and they are very tasty (try Ballast Point Tongue Buckler if you can get it). I have one coming up a few batches from now. Let us know how the AHB one comes out.

Cheers!

+1 for Tongue Buckler. Very tasty. Port Brewing Shark Attack is also quite excellent if you can get it. Imperial Red (RIPA) is on my list of to do's.

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"genotype" post=279903 said:

"KZ" post=279874 said:

No, but I've had several imperial reds and they are very tasty (try Ballast Point Tongue Buckler if you can get it). I have one coming up a few batches from now. Let us know how the AHB one comes out.

Cheers!

+1 for Tongue Buckler. Very tasty. Port Brewing Shark Attack is also quite excellent if you can get it. Imperial Red (RIPA) is on my list of to do's.

+2 to Tongue Buckler, it's mighty tastey. I've never heard of Shark Attack, isn't that mildly ironic. Thanks for mentioning it genotype.
When I think red ale, the first beer that comes to mind is Green Flash's Hop Head Red.

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Just more beer we can't get here. :(
No biggie, I'll just pretend what I make is just as good.

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The Red IPA kit came in today. Won't be making it for a while but it has 3 oz of hops plus 1 dry hopped.
I'll likely add a bit more hops maybe doing a FWH. To me, an IPA of 5 gallons should have at least 4 ozs of hops in it not counting dry hopping but that's just my OCD rule.

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If you want to try some commercial Red IPAs, I'd recommend Green Flash Hop Head Red (recently renamed the generic name Red IPA for some reason... I like the old name better), Sam Adams Tasman Red, Founders Red's RyePA, and Oskar Blues G'Knight Imperial Red Ale as a few examples.

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What wont they add hops to and call it an IPA?

We have black, red and white variants to the original style so far. When they turn the beer green next year during St. Pats day im going to dry hop right in the glass and call it a Green IPA.

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Guest System Admin

Thanks to WingsFANin KC. for the link. I'll have to get back down there and try 1.

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I agree with you drgnfli00, the IPA label is getting rather broad. So much so, that I can't help but automatically slap it on just about anything "hoppy." In any case, another good beer is Heretic's Evil Twin. The style is actually a strong ale, but I suppose it could be considered a red IPA.

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"drgnfli00" post=279993 said:

What wont they add hops to and call it an IPA?

We have black, red and white variants to the original style so far. When they turn the beer green next year during St. Pats day im going to dry hop right in the glass and call it a Green IPA.

Interesting take. I tend to straddle the fence on this one. On the one hand, it's great that new styles are being developed. I read a column (can't remember what site) about how Black IPAs should be their own legitimate judging category, or some such. No reason not to legitimize it and come up with style standards. This is the same type of thing that happened when lagers were developed way back when. We know what a Pilsner is supposed to be because after the development of the style, that style was defined. And offshoots, such as Czech, German, and American Pilsners are legitimate categories with their own style guidelines.

I think it's a little more than just adding hops to something and calling it an IPA. At least, I hope it is.

That being said, I've thought for some time that the popularity of hoppy beers is the latest fad among beer snobs. It's almost as if some secret Bitter Beer Drinking Club exists, and the hoppier you can stand your beer, the more street cred you get among your fellow beer drinkers.

Meanwhile, these people are just as narrow-minded and deluded as the dyed-in-the-wool BMC drinkers, because that's all they know, that's their standard, and they're not willing to deviate from it. Therefore, breweries have to widen the IPA footprint, the same way BMC is making attempts to compete with the micros, stylistically (hence, Bud Light Lime and whatever honey wheat is out there).

I do think a lot of it is marketing and targeting a certain demographic, and whatever else companies have to do to remain competitive.

But I don't think that de-legitimizes what might constitute a new style or a subcategory of an existing style.

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It could be possible that the IPA label is being added to brews just to identify it to the masses as being hoppy. Not entirely a bad thing, but the same could be accomplished without an IPA label with a general description on the label. But, I guess it's much easier and easier to spot the IPA label.
While I guess it could be argued that "watering down" the standards of styles by "mislabeling" them is a detrement to the craft, you could bring it a step further and look at the German definition of beer and the law around that. (reinboten?? ) sp..

With all that said, I can see the frustration from people in the know who may buy these "mislabeled" beers and be disappointed in the purchase.

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You really can't find much on 'Red IPA' anywhere. It's basically not even a style......yet. Austin HBS says "This American style IPA has a great citrusy nose and flavor. Its deep red color and terrific mouthfeel, makes this beer one of a kind."
I know it's not an absolute but one of the things that separates an IPA from an IPA is dry hopping.
I'm just trying to brew beers I've never done before so that I can get to know more about the changing styles.

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To the discussion on whether we need a new style for this or not, I offer the following info:

The stats for the AHB Red IPA are listed as:

OG: 1.059 / FG: 1.015 / ABV: 5.8% / IBU: ? / SRM: ?

The 2008 BJCP Style Guidlines specifically mention Red Ales in as many as five categories (along with a passing color reference in a Belgian style which of couse does not apply to this discusion).

9D. Irish Red (malty, less hops, doesn't fit the AHB Red IPA)
17B Flanders Red (a sour... No fit here)

The next three could all apply, depending on where the IBU's and SRM end up...

10B. American Amber
OG: 1.045-60 / FG: 1.010-15 / ABV: 4.5-6.2% / IBU: 25-40 / SRM: 10-17

14B. American IPA
OG: 1.056-75 / FG: 1.010-18 / ABV: 5.5-7.5% / IBU: 40-70 / SRM: 6-15

23. Specialty Beer (Allows for Imperil Red Ales)
OG, FG, ABV, IBU, SRM vary with Base Beer Style

As a point of interest, me thinks you could make it fit any of the last three easily.

:)

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I didn't think I'd get as many comments on this as I did and that's awesome as it's Reds are new to me. Heck, there's still people arguing about Blacks.

Either way, I have one or two brews to get to before this one and I only got it now as it was 20% off and I needed a few other things. It's an IPA (ish) beer and I will drink it and very likely, enjoy it!

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Me personally, I agree. I now view "styles" as a generality in the direction I want to head. I don't ever see myself entering comps where sticking to style is important. I just want to enjoy a beer. If I'm with people who are strict with their labels, then I watch what I say. Don't want to argue, just want to drink a beer. :stout:

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"mtsoxfan" post=280056 said:

Me personally, I agree. I now view "styles" as a generality in the direction I want to head. I don't ever see myself entering comps where sticking to style is important. I just want to enjoy a beer. If I'm with people who are strict with their labels, then I watch what I say. Don't want to argue, just want to drink a beer. :stout:

This ^.

I love beer and would never want to miss a new or phenomenal experience because the beer cannot be categorized. As an example, the Mr. Beer recipe for Gigantor Quad, misses a couple of the BJCP guidelines for a Belgian Quad, but the beer is delicious (the best Mr. Beer recipe I have had yet).

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They cover this type of beer in "Brewing Classic Styles" as a subset of the American Amber. They call it "West Coast Amber" and I actually have that recipe in one of my kegs right now. Its pretty great.

Dave, I take issue with the notion that liking hoppy beers is a fad. This is been a phoenomenon for well over a decade now, faaar to long to be a "fad." :laugh: It can only be considered an obsession at this point!

Besides everyone knows that Belgians/Saisons are the new beer snob fad ;) :drinking:

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"VTGroff" post=280122 said:

Besides everyone knows that Belgians/Saisons are the new beer snob fad ;) :drinking:


I won't commment on whether it's a beer snob thing, but it does seem to be the new fad. I remember less than 2 years ago the only saison I could find were a few lonely bottles of Dupont, and now it seems EVERYONE has one. Though to be fair, it seems IIPA's have grown at the same rate.

Not that I'm complaining, I love 'em both! :gulp:

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"VTGroff" post=280122 said:

They cover this type of beer in "Brewing Classic Styles" as a subset of the American Amber. They call it "West Coast Amber" and I actually have that recipe in one of my kegs right now. Its pretty great.

Dave, I take issue with the notion that liking hoppy beers is a fad. This is been a phoenomenon for well over a decade now, faaar to long to be a "fad." :laugh: It can only be considered an obsession at this point!

Besides everyone knows that Belgians/Saisons are the new beer snob fad ;) :drinking:

I didn't mean that it's a fad for everyone. Of course, people can and do enjoy drinking hoppy beers as one of their favorite styles.

My point was more addressing a feeling I have (unsubstantiated, but there all the same) that many people, especially young people, who have latched onto the craft beer explosion contend that they only like mega-hopped beers, the more bitter, the better. I just have a gut feeling that many of them don't really have an educated palate, and couldn't intelligently discuss beer styles; they just tried a highly hopped craft beer at the urging of someone else, and decided it was the cool thing to drink.

Perhaps "fad" is the wrong word, and I don't know what word would best describe what I'm groping for. I'll go back to my analogy of them being in the same category as the guy who only drinks PBR or Milwaukee's Best, because that's the beer he started with, and dammit, that's what he likes.

These people aren't really beer aficionados, whether they're drinking BMC or craft/micros. They're just narrow in their scope. IMO, someone who truly appreciates beer drinks many different styles, depending on their mood, depending perhaps on what food they're pairing it with, or just to try something new and discover a new style, or a new take on a style. They'll have their preferences, of course, and there's nothing wrong with their preference being a strongly hopped IPA. But if given the opportunity to sample a new and interesting brown ale or pilsner, they'll gladly and thoughtfully sample it.

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"FedoraDave" post=280140 said:

"VTGroff" post=280122 said:

IMO, someone who truly appreciates beer drinks many different styles, depending on their mood, depending perhaps on what food they're pairing it with, or just to try something new and discover a new style, or a new take on a style. They'll have their preferences, of course, and there's nothing wrong with their preference being a strongly hopped IPA. But if given the opportunity to sample a new and interesting brown ale or pilsner, they'll gladly and thoughtfully sample it.

100% Agree!

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I was mostly just giving you crap, Dave :)

I agree that people shouldn't limit the styles of beers they try just because they happen to have an affinity for a certain characteristic of a style or set of styles. I think people just start to explore craft beer, find what they like and explore that even deeper. I think it's just human nature. If you're doing it to the detriment of opening up yourself to new experiences, of course that's a problem, but I don't think that's a characteristic unique to people who like hoppy beers, I just think that's a characteristic of human nature.

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"VTGroff" post=280190 said:

I was mostly just giving you crap, Dave :)

I agree that people shouldn't limit the styles of beers they try just because they happen to have an affinity for a certain characteristic of a style or set of styles. I think people just start to explore craft beer, find what they like and explore that even deeper. I think it's just human nature. If you're doing it to the detriment of opening up yourself to new experiences, of course that's a problem, but I don't think that's a characteristic unique to people who like hoppy beers, I just think that's a characteristic of human nature.

True. We get ourselves adjusted to whatever we're used to, especially when it comes to food and beverages. We buy the same brand of spaghetti or soup because that's what we're accustomed to, and change is a risk, and risks are scary.

I tread a fine line with the comments I made above, because there's no way to actually prove my contention. Let's take one of our own members as an example. A good example, by the way. Swenocha loves his hoppy beers. He's said so plenty of times, and I hope he drinks and enjoys a lot of them. Thing is, he's also posted a lot about the other styles he's tried, and written a lot of informative, educated, thoughtful reviews about these beers. I consider him to be a beer aficionado, and I trust his judgment when it comes to well-made beers of any style.

There's a big difference between our friend Swen and the types I've seen in other beer forums who sort of make it like a hot-pepper-eating contest. Who can stand the most bitter beer, because my favorite beer is Turn Your Face Inside-Out IPA, and it's exclusive to MY AREA, and that makes it the BEST BEER around, because I drink it all the time.

I just get a sense that these guys got introduced to IPAs almost as a challenge, and that made them "one of the guys", and they stopped drinking Miller Genuine Draft, and decided to become beer snobs, because THEY drink IPAs. And yet they have no knowledge of any other styles, and would sneer if I ordered a brown ale with my steak, because that's what I had a hankering for.

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