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sburrill

Someone help mr befor I quit this whole thing..

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Ok so I am drinking batch #2, Surly Dog IPA, which would be actually a pretty damn good beer EXCEPT for two things...too much carbonation and a subtle cider taste. Keep in mind the first batch of American Pale came out wicked cidery and at the advice of you guys I dropped the sugar priming amounts on the IPA to 1.5 tsp. per bottle.

Right now I have a batch or American IPA conditioning in the bottle and a batch of the Quad in the Keg. I swear to god if these two come our cidery I am done...unless someone has a solution. :shoot: :smash:

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Put the beer away...Let it sit, let it condition, time will make your beer better...

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If you dropped to 1.5 tsp per bottle and it's still over ca4rbed, that indicates to me that it may not have been done fermenting before being bottled.

I use 2 tsp per and mine come out great. I ferment for three weeks total (18 days at 68 deg + 3 final days in cold crash) before bottling.

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"Fat Pete" post=283697 said:

Put the beer away...Let it sit, let it condition, time will make your beer better...

The robust man they call Pete speaks the truth.

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Wise words above. We can help more with more info from you.

How long was it in the fermenter before you bottled?
Did you take any gravity readings, if so, what were they?
How long has it been conditioning, and at what temp?
How long did you chill it before opening one?

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"GWCR" post=283705 said:

Wise words above. We can help more with more info from you.

How long was it in the fermenter before you bottled?
Did you take any gravity readings, if so, what were they?
How long has it been conditioning, and at what temp?
How long did you chill it before opening one?


+1, need more information.

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Ok thanks guys. So: I folowed the 2,2,2 rule. 2 weeks in LBK, 2 weeks in Bottle @ 68F and 2 days in Fridge. I will say now at day 4 in fridge it is a bit better.

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Take your beer out of the fridge, set it in the dark, 68 - 70 degrees, give it another 2 weeks. You won't be disappointed...

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2-2-2 generally means (on this site) 2 weeks in the LBK, 2 weeks to carb at room temp and then 2 more weeks to condition at room temp. (Many think of it as 2-4.)

Then you chill it for 4-6 days.

I personally use the 3-4 method becasue a lot of my beers need the extra time in the LBK.

:borg:

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So I should be bottle conditioning for four weeks? Is this for jus tthis recipe or all? Man I am not sure I can wait!!!

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"sburrill" post=283714 said:

Ok thanks guys. So: I folowed the 2,2,2 rule. 2 weeks in LBK, 2 weeks in Bottle @ 68F and 2 days in Fridge. I will say now at day 4 in fridge it is a bit better.


Okay. So you fermented for two weeks, that is good. You gave them 2 weeks to carbonate, and most of the time this is adequate. But the beer will be better if you give it some additional time at room temp to condition. Personally, I wouldn't touch it until it had been in the bottle for at least 4 weeks. In my experience, some of the old Mr. Beer recipes took 8-12 weeks to properly condition - depending on ingredients.

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"sburrill" post=283718 said:

So I should be bottle conditioning for four weeks? Is this for jus tthis recipe or all? Man I am not sure I can wait!!!

Let it sit...you won't be disappointed...pick up a 6 of New Castle Brown Ale to help pass the time.

Patience my friend, you will be rewarded...

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Ok as usual the collecive wisdom is rapid and immense here. To recap...I actually should follow prescribed sugar priming amounts, however, I need to ferment, in general, at least 3 weeks, and then bottle condition four 4 weeks. Si?

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"sburrill" post=283724 said:

Ok as usual the collecive wisdom is rapid and immense here. To recap...I actually should follow prescribed sugar priming amounts, however, I need to ferment, in general, at least 3 weeks, and then bottle condition four 4 weeks. Si?

*standing and clapping* Yes! You are correct!!

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That's a good starting point. If after 4 weeks, it still doesn't taste good, let it sit out at room temp for another week or two.

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The absolute most important ingredient you can put into any home-brewed beer (especially Mr. Beer beers) is patience.

Time will heal all wounds and a lot of off-tastes in your home-brew.

I always let mine sit for a minimum of six weeks in the bottle. But recently I made a batch and it got too hot during fermentation. When I bottled it it tasted like liquid band-aides. I let that beer sit for ten weeks and the off taste was almost completely gone. Two weeks later and it's a pretty good beer.

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Guest System Admin

FWIW
When I try a brew and its pretty good at 3-4-2 (Ferment, warm condition, fridge)then I go with that. But some of my recipes aren't so good at 3-4-2 so I try to wait longer. LOTS of my batches are better after 4-6 Weeks in the fridge. And the biggest help is usually more warm conditioning. So (I have a lot of variations from this but) my average time for all batches is 3-7-6.
Don't give up yet. :cheers:

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Great advice all around. I'll add one thing... beer generally doesn't need three weeks in the fermenter, but without a hydrometer (the best $8 investment you'll make in your brewing career), you're unlikely to know if it is done. If you do not have a hydrometer, 3 weeks is a good, conservative timeline to stick to.

Oh, and...

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The positive side effect is that by discovering patience, you can buy more bottles and brew more beer. That's why I have a stupid number of bottles and 3 LBKs LOL.

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Excellent advice from everyone.

I would encourage you to get a hydrometer. They're inexpensive, but one of the most valuable tools a homebrewer can have. In fact, get two; they tend to commit suicide if left alone. I broke two in one day.

Get a second LBK if you don't already have one. Brewing another batch of beer can help take your mind off the batch you've got conditioning. In the meantime, buy craft beers and expand your experience with different styles that are professionally made, so you can determine what you'd like to brew in the future (and to build up a storehouse of bottles).

Once you've got a healthy pipeline, the waiting becomes easier.

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Once you've got a healthy pipeline, the waiting becomes easier.

+1,000 to that!!

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I'm actually moving to the camp of 1 week of conditioning for each 10 points of OG.

So a 1.040 beer will need 4 weeks of conditioning, a 1.060 will need 6.

Yeah yeah, I know it keeps getting longer. But those higher ABV beers need more time to mellow and condition.

I've got a 1.081 Trippel that's been conditioning for 8 weeks, and I'm still going to give it another 4. It's awesome now, but I think it could be better.

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"sburrill" post=283694 said:

Ok so I am drinking batch #2, Surly Dog IPA, which would be actually a pretty damn good beer EXCEPT for two things...too much carbonation and a subtle cider taste. Keep in mind the first batch of American Pale came out wicked cidery and at the advice of you guys I dropped the sugar priming amounts on the IPA to 1.5 tsp. per bottle.

Right now I have a batch or American IPA conditioning in the bottle and a batch of the Quad in the Keg. I swear to god if these two come our cidery I am done...unless someone has a solution. :shoot: :smash:

Please don't give up, you are only getting started. Once you get your pipeline going and I mean really going, you can afford to wait on the batches, but you can always try one brew a week from each batch once you get past the 4 week mark of conditioning the batches. No need to keep drinking them if they still taste cidery etc. Time heals most homebrews or at least loses some of that taste feel that you are experiencing. Patience, Pipeline & brewing will get you to where you want to be. I have taken beers out of the fridge and let them warm-condition for a few more weeks numerous times and then chilled them again to a vast improvement. Good luck, happy brewing and get that pipeline a rocking. Pretty soon they will call you Chevron. :cheers:

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Stick with it. You will start cranking out tasty beers before you know it.

I will bring up one thing since you did complain about it being over carbonated. I find that the Mr Beer instructions for carbing are very high compared to the style guidelines for most beer.

Math done before coffee below so take with a grain of salt:

For an IPA you want 1.5 to 2.3 volumes of C02 so we will pick the and say 1.9 volumes of CO2.

If your beer is at 72 degrees before bottling you will need 1.2 oz of table sugar.

Online 1 tsp of sugar is listed as weighing 4.2 grams

4.2 grams is .14 oz

We will assume 20 beers bottled which is the lowest I ended up with.

.14 oz * 20 is 2.8 oz of sugar used to bottle.

If my math is correct you could do .5 tsp of sugar per bottle to keep it in the IPA style guidelines.

And the amount of carbonation can change the flavor quite a bit.

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I actually bought a hydrometer but need to learn how to use it! Is there video somewhere you reccomend? I feel like I did it wrong. And how do you test during fermentation...just pull some off the tap?

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That video was very good. Useful and funny too.

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