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chalkjhawk79

American Wheat Beer

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Okay, so I'm almost ready to venture out on my own and concoct my "own" beer. I enjoy a nice American Wheat beer so am on the lookout for ingredients. I want to use unhopped malt extract and add hops separately so I have more control (and hence more "my own") over the hoppiness of it.

I am having trouble figuring out Mr Beer's unhopped malt extract though. It looks like this is their wheat LME but the description doesn't say what % of wheat it is (i.e. 40% wheat, 60% barley). Is it 100% wheat or what? If anyone has any great tips for making a basic American Wheat feel free to chime in. I'd like for it to be all american (i.e. only American hops). I actually really enjoy semi-hoppy wheat beer...which I know is a bit out of character for a wheat beer...but that's what I like! Anyway, if someone could steer me in the right direction concerning the MB wheat extract I'd be forever grateful, thank you!

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I don't know if going to Live Chat on the MrB website will get your question answered or not 0 they may not want to divulge what the new LME's have in them, exactly. But you could ask.

The new LME's are only .55 lb so to make a 2.13 gallon MrB batch your're going to need at least 4 of them to approximate the amount of extract in a 1.87 lb HME can and go from there.

Personally, if you are going to use unhopped extracts, I'd go with some Dried Malt Extract (DME) from the LHBS. I asked you before and didn't get a response......are you in the Kansas City metero area? Your handle implies a KU graduate and a lot of them live here in the KC Metero.

If you are here in KC, then check out The Home Brew Pro Shoppe in Olathe. Charlie, the owner, is an awesome dude and can hook you up. He's got a good selection of pellet hops and DMEs and that's where I get my grains from.

If you like hoppy wheat beer, have you tried the new 80 Acre Hoppy Wheat from Boulevard? I'm in the process of trying to work out a recipe to copy that one using the WWW as a base and adding a sh*tload of flavor and aroma hops, including dry hopping after primary fermentation's done.

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Sorry I didn't reply to your question on the other thread! But no, I'm not in KC metro area...although I did go to KU. I live in Valley Center..suburb of Wichita. There's a LHBS in the area here that I might take a gander at. I've been there a couple times, but only to take a look at their equipment.

I have definitely tried the new 80-acre (a couple weeks ago) and it might be my new favorite brew! Love Boulevard.

Sorry for my ignorance, but what exactly does WWW stand for in the homebrew world? In any case...it sounds like we're attempting sort of the same thing (hoppy wheat).

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WWW = Whispering Wheat Weizenbier.

It's an "old" HME produced by MrBeer that's been discontinued.

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Oh I forgot to elaborate on the DME....you'll want to get Bavarian Wheat DME if you're going to try to control your own recipe. Noble hops like Hallertauer, Tettnanger or Saaz go well in wheat beers for bittering.

For the hop forward aroma and flavor....Cascade or Centennial (or both) are great. Last time I was drinking an 80 Acre, I got out my hops collection and when I stuck my nose in a bag of Centennial I thought that was the one that smelled the most like 80 Acre.

:borg:

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I made an excellent wheat beer. I used a 3.3# can of muntons wheat LME and 1# of wheat DME. I believe the ratio is 65/35. I used hallertau and saaz hops and used white labs hefeweisen IV yeast. It was a very worthwhile endevour.

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All good feedback, thanks! FYI to Wings_Fan....I briefly talked to a boulevard rep a week ago at an 80-acre sampling here in Wichita. He mentioned that they dry-hopped the 80-acre. So although it might seem pretty hoppy...I think it's mostly aroma. Thought you might like that tidbit of info if you're taking a stab at it!

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Yeah, I figured that the hop additions in 80 Acre were mainly for flavor (short boils) and aroma (ala dry hopping). There is "some" bittering in the 80 Acre but not much.

As I said, my plan is to dry hop the sh*t out of it.

LOL

I'll pass on a tidbit to you as well, as told to me by one of the Ninkasi here (thanks Mashani!!) and reproduced below for reference. People who aren't really into craft beers always say a beer is "hoppy" but we really don't know what they mean by that becasue it's such a subjective term. There is a better way to describe the hops effects in beer.

(1) Bitter - a sort of harshness or bite in the back of your throat
(2) Hop Forward - lots of hops flavor and aroma that's in your face

How I apply these can be demonstrated by getting out a botle of Single Wide IPA and a bottle of 80 Acre Wheat and taste testing them side by side.

The Single Wide IPA has both (1) and (2) because it's got very strong bittering hops but it also has that "in your face" Centennial flavor/aroma.

The 80 Acre Wheat has "minimal" (1) but it has a load of (2).

Throwing another favorite into the mix, the Sierra Nevada Pale Ale has a good amount of (1) but not so much (2).

Hopefully you've had all of these and can see what I'm trying to 'splain. It really didn't hit me until I had the Single Wide and 80 Acre at the same siting. It was like a H.B.E. (Home Brew Epiphany) !!!

Mashani's take on "hoppy":

IBUs are a measure of "bitterness", not "hoppyness" in the sense of flavor and aroma. 30 IBUs is 30 IBUs, regardless of whether the hops it came from were added as a early (bittering only boil) or if they came from a late addition which left behind flavor and/or aroma as well as bitterness.

In either case they still balance out the malt, and it's still just as "bitter". Sometimes you get a bit of an initial "bite", a slightly more "harsh" kind of note from a long boil hop addition that you don't get from a late addition, but measurably it's the same IBUs, and it balances the malt sweetness just as much overall.

Hop flavor is NOT hop bitterness, and has no direct relationship to IBUs beyond whatever bittering compounds happen to be extracted by those late additions and added to the early boil IUBs.

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I like a hoppy wheat beer too. I think amarillo's go well with an American style wheat beer. Some wheat DME/LME, a bit of crystal malt, small bittering addition, nice flavor/aroma additions, and a big dry hop. Can't go wrong with that.

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They can be tough to find because they are very popular in the craft brew industry right now (as well as with homebrewers)...when I can find them I load up!

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Not to hijack the thread, but I have some wheat yeast that I need to use up soon.

I am planning on making a couple 5 gallon batches of lemon wheat beer.

The last lemon wheat that I made was with the old www hme & a can of the old golden wheat ume. Everyone that has had this beer says it is my best batch to date &I agree.

So my question is does anybody know a hop schedule for a 5 gallon batch that might replicate that?

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Hey chalkjhawk79 - I might have just made your day - check this out.

From a source that also works for boulevard. The bittering hops is a higher alpha hop (usually zeus or bravo). Then dry hopping with Cascade and Nelson Sauvin is what hits you in the nose on 80 Acre. (i did not pick up on the N/S hops right away but now that it's been mentioned in the context of 80 Acre, I can see it.)

A good first draft extract recipe for this could be something like this.....(Note: This recipe is for 5 gallons. For a MrB size 2.13 gallon batch just reduce the amounts by one-half to scale it down):

3 lbs Golden Light DME (Extract)
3 lbs Bavarian Wheat DME (Extract)
1 lbs Crystal 10L or Cara-Pils (Grain - Steeped)

Boil @ 50 min: 1/2 oz Magnum
Boil @ 7 min: 1/2 oz Casacade
Flameout: 1/2 oz Nelson Sauvin
Dry Hop with 1 oz each of Cascade & Nelson Sauvin (after primary fermentation)


Head to your Wichita LHBS and pick up the stuff to try this one out!!

:borg:

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Great, thanks for downlow on the 80-acre! I'm going to take that info, along with your recipe you suggested, and see what I can concoct. I'll try to remember to post the results of it!

One thing...I'm still a newbie so I'm not quite sure what the "1 lbs Crystal 10L or Cara-Pils (Grain - Steeped)" is or what it would add to the beer? I've only worked with extracts to this point...

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The grain will add body and "mouthfeel" to the beer making it seem not so thin or watery which is a complaint that a lot of extract brews can get. It also gives a better retention on the head and can produce nicer "lacing" on the glass.

To gain the benefit of the grain, you just steep it prior to your hops boils - steeping is basically like making tea. Bring at least 1 gallon (I use 4 to 6 quarts when steeping) of water to a temp of 165 degrees (never over 170 degrees) and then add your grain (in a grain sack). Flame off, put the lid on your brew pot and time out 30 minutes - don't open the pot lid during the 30 minutes or you'll lose the heat.

After 30 minutes is up, lift up the grain sack (I use tongs) and let it "tea bag" drain and some say do not squeeze the bag or you'll get of flavors from tannins and some husk material in your wort. I just let it hang/drain for as long as I can stand there and hold it up but in the past......shhhhhh........I have been known to squeeze the bag a little bit between my tongs and the side of the brew pot. Then discard the grains.

You can then add 1.5 lbs of the DME to the steeped "grain tea water" and bring up to a good rolling boil - don't turn your back....it likes to boil over just before the hot break (hot break is when the gathering of the foam on top of the boil begins to subside - there's more to it than that technically but this is all you need to know unless you're dying to read up on the subject). You need DME in the water to get good hop utilization efficiency - boiling hops in plain water doesn't do anything but make the hops soggy.

After the hot break, throw in your first hops addition (for bittering) and begin your countdown timer at 50 minutes. When there is 7 minutes left on the countdown, throw in the aroma hops. At flame out you add the rest of the DME to the wort mixture as well as the last hop addition that will sit in the wort until it's cooled down to yeast pitch temps when it's pulled out.

Does that help you out on steeping grains?

:shoot:    :think:

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Awww shucks. Just passing on what I learned on this site over the past many months.

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Jayhawk?? Did you ever find the time to make this one?

I'm brewing my version of 80 Acre Hoppy Wheat this weekend.

Wondering if/how yours turned out?

I got more info on the ingredients from Julie Weeks at Boulevard on the 80 Acre recipe:

“The malts are: pale malt, wheat, wheat malt. The hops are: Bravo, Zeus, and/or Summit hops for bittering. Don’t get too wrapped up in the bittering hops as they change with availability. For 80-Acre Hoppy Wheat beer we add Cascade hops in the whirlpool and it also gets dry hopped with Cascade and Nelson Sauvin hops”.

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Sorry it's taken me so long to respond! I haven't yet been able to try this out yet...my wife just had our second baby a month and a half ago and I haven't been able to do any brewing lately!

How about yours? Did you ever get a chance to make it?

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I did make mine and it was pretty good. Not exact but pretty good. Next time around will use more hops late to impart the hop forward aroma and flavor and then also dry hop with at least .75 to 1.00 oz of Cascade, Centennial or Amarillo.

Congrats on your new family member!!

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KC,

Is this "80 Acre Hoppy Wheat from Boulevard" just a local brew, or is it something I might find at a local beer store here in Michigan? It sounds really interesting, and I want to do a 5 gallon wheat batch. I want to split it into 2 2.5 gallon batches, one a Leinies Sunset Wheat clone (one of my favorite store bought beers), and one something a bit different. This beers sounds very interesting and something I might want to do for the second batch.

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Hey Rich - Boulevard is a brewery out of Kansas that I see all over the place in Colorado. I think they are fairly well distributed as I THINK I saw some in MD this past week (not sure - since I can get it here I immediately bypassed in favor of something I had never had before).

As I have all the ingredients that Wings Fan mentioned - I may have to grab a 80 Acre (hadn't tried that one yet) and see how I like it for a nice summer beer.

One question for Boulevard fans - are the bottles recappable? I remember one time buying a mix pack of Boulevard and of something else at the same time - and then discovering after the fact that someones bottles werent useable.

Cheers
jeff

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The ones I get here in OP, KS are always pry-offs.

Nice bottles. Labels are stuck on pretty well.

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The ones I get here in OP, KS are always pry-offs.

Nice bottles. Labels are stuck on pretty well.

My recipe was:

I made my version of it using WWW as a base.

1.21 lb WWW HME
1.00 lb Bav Wheat DME
.50 lb Golden Light DME
.25 lb Steeped CaraPils

.30 oz Cascade @17 min
.15 oz Chinook @ 17 min

.25 Centennial (dry hop)
.20 Cascade (dry hop)
.15 Chinook (dry hop)

It was very good if you like the idea of throwing hops at a wheat beer. What I would change? Maybe do a hop burst to add more hop forwardness and then dry hop with 1.00 oz of Centennial.

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Well I just did one of the make your own six pack deals and included the Hoppy Wheat from Boulevard. It was a very good combination. I will look into grabbing a WWW next trip to the beer store. Never tried that one from MrB. Have several pounds of hops in freezer and too much free time so doing a little hop bursting won't be a problem at this end :)

Cheers
jeff

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Better get a Bav Wheat......WWW is an old MrB HME and isn't available any longer.

My bad for not mentioning that prior.

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Ahh but it is :) My local beer supermarket still has some of the old refills. $14 - which I try not to spend on the single can ones but I have grabbed a couple ADIPA, Pilothouse and a few others of late. Ones I hadnt tried before.

If nothing else I can always get a can of wheat LME at LHBS as well. :)

Cheers
jeff

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