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Brewsus Yeast

SMaSHing, Baby! (MO/Willamette)

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I haven't done an all-grain batch for over a year, and even that one was my first. When I started hearing about single-malt, single-hops (SMaSH) recipes, I thought I'd give that a go since it sounded simple enough as AG batches go.

So with my shiny new 20+ quart brew pot in hand, I did a LBK-sized batch using 5# of Maris Otter and an ounce of Willamette hops:

0.25 oz for 60 min
0.37 oz for 15 min
0.37 oz for 5 min

I've been brewing hopbombs lately so the mild estimated 18 IBU should be a nice change of pace. Plus, I want to get a good feel for what Maris Otter really tastes like.

Working out how much water to start out with in the pot took a bit of fiddling, but the calculator at http://www.simplebiabcalculator.com/ made the process simpler.

Throwing the recipe into Hopville.com com, I figured I'd get an OG around 1.051, but I ended up with 1.056 somehow, so I was happy with that. I didn't think I'd get that sort of efficiency with a BIAB batch.

Keeping with the English-y theme, I used some inexpensive Munton's dry ale yeast.

Sure, it takes much longer to brew (Steep-boil-chill took me about 3+ hours), but at less than $10.50 for ingredients, we're talking less than Schaefer Light pricing for what will probably be a nice session brew.

Lessons learned? I need to make ruler markings on my brew spoon so I can better gauge how much wort is in the pot. The pot has gallon markings on the side, but they're hard to see when the wort's boiling. Also, if I end up doing AG batches more often, I'm going to need to get a wort chiller or make one.

Next time, I might pick some other base malt, and see if I can find some of those New Zealand hops like the Nelson Sauvins... Yum.... :P

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Had a 100% maris otter barleywine at my brew club meeting last night. I love MO and have used it quite a bit but never as the only grain, and I was impressed with how much flavor it had. Helps that the couple that brewed it used 16lb of grain, and that it had been aged for a year. :)

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I don't think you can go wrong with these ingredients. Should be good stuff!

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Marris Otter makes the best SMaSH beers! I prefer it with Cascade hops myself. Makes for a very tasty and simple pale ale! :chug:

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"Knightmare" post=288575 said:

Marris Otter makes the best SMaSH beers! I prefer it with Cascade hops myself. Makes for a very tasty and simple pale ale! :chug:

I really like Cascades, too, but I thought I'd experiment with with earthy, spicy side of the spectrum a little more.

What's the head retention like with Maris Otter? I thought about steeping some Carapils, but then it wouldn't be a SMaSH brew.

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Hey Brewsus yeast, thanks for that link to the BIAB calculator, it's awesome!!! Should help me greatly on brew day!!!

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"Brewsus Yeast" post=288634 said:

"Knightmare" post=288575 said:

Marris Otter makes the best SMaSH beers! I prefer it with Cascade hops myself. Makes for a very tasty and simple pale ale! :chug:

I really like Cascades, too, but I thought I'd experiment with with earthy, spicy side of the spectrum a little more.

What's the head retention like with Maris Otter? I thought about steeping some Carapils, but then it wouldn't be a SMaSH brew.

The head retention was actually pretty good. I thought about the carapils too.

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I have heard that head retention is more a result of fresher ingredients than the type of grain used. Whether this is reliable, I can't say, but it seems reasonable to me.

Anyway, SMaSH recipes can be awesome. Sometimes less is more, y'know?

+1 on making a dipstick for measuring wort volume. I'd seen it done in a video before I started doing AG fivers, and I thought, "How clever! I'ma do that!" A simple dowel and a utility knife is all you need. And, since I'm going to start doing LBK-sized batches to develop AG recipes, and will be using a smaller brewpot for those, I did the same thing on the other end of the dowel for the second pot. Very convenient.

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"frogmeat69" post=288652 said:

Hey Brewsus yeast, thanks for that link to the BIAB calculator, it's awesome!!! Should help me greatly on brew day!!!


That's a good calc to use and one I use more often is this one.

I have a wooden spoon I only use for brewing but only for the mash and not the boil. I have it marked up to 8 gallons. I got a gallon jug and added it to my kettle 1 at a time and marked each gallon. It's not perfect but its very close.

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Sounds like a brewer's dream brewday, thanks for posting your results. I've yet to do a SmAsH myself using my mash tun but now you've got me thinking. As for Marris Otter I've brewed identical Burstin Out Pale Ale batches, one with 2 Row and the other with Marris Otter base malt and you can clearly tall the difference between the two.

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I've got 10 lbs of MO still thinking on what to do with it. Might use half MO and half 2 row or do a simple MO SMaSH.
I also can't brew fast enough during football season. Was brewing every other week but will have to skip this week due to my social life getting in the way.
I don't even drink that much so how am I going thru so much beer?

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I was ready to bottle on Monday -- got the bottles all sanitized and primed -- and then I took the gravity measurement. I need to remember to do that *before* I get the bottles ready because the SG was 1.022, which seemed a little high. Looking into it afterwards, it looks like that might be par for the course for the Munton's Dry Ale yeast which appears to not attenuate as much as I'm used to with other yeasts.

Regardless, I decided to abort the bottling, and I wrapped foil around the necks of the sanitized bottles. Supposing I try to bottle again this coming weekend, should I be okay with the foil "sealed" bottles, or do you think I ought to re-sanitize them?

Note to self.... get a refractometer and measure *before* starting the bottling process.

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"Brewsus Yeast" post=291008 said:

I was ready to bottle on Monday -- got the bottles all sanitized and primed -- and then I took the gravity measurement. I need to remember to do that *before* I get the bottles ready because the SG was 1.022, which seemed a little high. Looking into it afterwards, it looks like that might be par for the course for the Munton's Dry Ale yeast which appears to not attenuate as much as I'm used to with other yeasts.

Regardless, I decided to abort the bottling, and I wrapped foil around the necks of the sanitized bottles. Supposing I try to bottle again this coming weekend, should I be okay with the foil "sealed" bottles, or do you think I ought to re-sanitize them?

Note to self.... get a refractometer and measure *before* starting the bottling process.

Should be fine, I have done it as have others here...

Tin foil that is removed from a roll is food safe and for our purposes considered sanitary.

Just think how quickly botteling day will progress!

B)

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"BigPapaG" post=291017 said:

Should be fine, I have done it as have others here...

Tin foil that is removed from a roll is food safe and for our purposes considered sanitary.

Just think how quickly botteling day will progress!

B)

True dat. With the time I will have "saved" I can start another batch. I've got something like 12-15 Mr.Beer mixes on the shelf!

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Well, I gave it another week and the SG only dropped from 1.022 to 1.020, but I bottled it anyway. I had run out of priming sugar, so I jammed in a sugar cube into each of the bottles. It was pretty cloudy, but I'm sure 2-4 weeks in the bottle will take care of most of that. The hydrometer sample was tasty and nicely balanced. For a simple brew, this should be pretty good.

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I'm really curious what a beer tastes like with only MO. I don't even know of any craft beers that are all MO. I should just do all MO and try it but there are some that say I should try 50/50 2 row and MO.
I assume most of the true British Ales are made with primarily MO.
I keep looking at mine and wondering when I'm going to do something with it. Got a pound of Cascades and a pound of Centennial so maybe I should get going on it soon. I look forward to your comments as you sneak a taste.

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Brewsus, have you gotten a taste of this yet?

I am planning (still in planning) to use my 10# of MO and do a SMaSH with centennial but I really want something a bit heavier. I'd rather not go buy more MO since I have so much malt at home now so I may just add a few pounds of 2 row to get me closer to 1.060. Wouldn't be a true SMaSH but I would still be able to get a good idea what MO is. Might each add so 20L to it to give it some color.

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