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vitch61

Too Much Pop & Other Stuff

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Thinking about carbonation. I've been doing the Mr. Beer recommendation of 2.5 teaspoons/1 liter. Great beer -- but a little too much "pop-like" carbonation with some batches. I'm interested in seeing the difference.

BTW, I started MB in May -- and I already on batch #23! I have 4 fermenters usually going. I'm taking really good notes on each batch. Today I brewed the following:

1. Bavarian Weissbeir Deluxe -- This is my favorite MB refill. This is the third batch, but now I'm adding the LME.

2. Diablo IPA -- I have one batch of this ready in 2 weeks.

3. NW Pale Ale -- Absolutely smells the best!

4. Munton Premium Bitter -- Got a dented can for $11!

Guys, thanks for your collective expertise. This is all so much easier when you have a dynamite forum like this.

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I suggest using corn sugar as opposed to cane sugar. Others may disagree, but I have found the batches I made that I primed with cane sugar to be soda like, large bubbles. All batches I made primed with corn sugar had beer/ale carbonation, fine carbonation.

That's been my experience. As I say, others may disagree, but I only prime with corn sugar.

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"Fat Pete" post=290166 said:

I suggest using corn sugar as opposed to cane sugar. Others may disagree, but I have found the batches I made that I primed with cane sugar to be soda like, large bubbles. All batches I made primed with corn sugar had beer/ale carbonation, fine carbonation.

That's been my experience. As I say, others may disagree, but I only prime with corn sugar.


I won't disagree Pete, But I like a lot of carb and have mostly used table sugar except for a few trys with honey and with corn sugar. When using MB recommendations some brews may come out over carbed.

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CORRECTION: I indicated I use 1.5 teaspoons/liter. I misspoke. Make that 2.5. I'm going to see if I can go back and edit that.

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"Fat Pete" post=290166 said:

I suggest using corn sugar as opposed to cane sugar. Others may disagree, but I have found the batches I made that I primed with cane sugar to be soda like, large bubbles. All batches I made primed with corn sugar had beer/ale carbonation, fine carbonation.

That's been my experience. As I say, others may disagree, but I only prime with corn sugar.

Interesting. I've used honey mostly, and was pretty pleased with that type of carbonation, but it was getting expensive, so I switched to Booster, which I had a surplus of (still do). And I've used corn sugar on a couple of batches, one of which hasn't finished conditioning yet.

It may be the amount of Booster I've used, but some of those batches seemed to be over-carbed, and I've been thinking I need to cut back. But it may be type of sugar itself.

I've heard DME is very good for a carbing agent, but I haven't tried it, and don't know how much is recommended.

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"FedoraDave" post=290245 said:

"Fat Pete" post=290166 said:

I suggest using corn sugar as opposed to cane sugar. Others may disagree, but I have found the batches I made that I primed with cane sugar to be soda like, large bubbles. All batches I made primed with corn sugar had beer/ale carbonation, fine carbonation.

That's been my experience. As I say, others may disagree, but I only prime with corn sugar.

Interesting. I've used honey mostly, and was pretty pleased with that type of carbonation, but it was getting expensive, so I switched to Booster, which I had a surplus of (still do). And I've used corn sugar on a couple of batches, one of which hasn't finished conditioning yet.

It may be the amount of Booster I've used, but some of those batches seemed to be over-carbed, and I've been thinking I need to cut back. But it may be type of sugar itself.

I've heard DME is very good for a carbing agent, but I haven't tried it, and don't know how much is recommended.

Dave, how much Booster do you use. I assume you batch prime. Thanks

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Dave,

so I switched to Booster, which I had a surplus of (still do).

I've been using sugar cubes since the first MrBeer batch I made and it seems to be okay but I too have a surplus of booster and would like to try it for priming. I bottle prime exclusively and hope you can tell me how much booster you would use for a 12 oz bottle.

Thanks,

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I use table sugar, but not the Mr. B recommended amounts. I've cut back and used Screwy's calculator. I don't get large bubbles with what I do now. However, with the Carapils steep, I do get a good head made of small bubbles. I think it may have more to do with how much primer is used, more so than the type of primer used.


[attachment=9103]Whale-spouts-rainbow.gif[/attachment]

Thar she blows!

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Birdman925, I do batch prime. I usually use between 70 and 75 grams of Booster to prime an LBK batch, but I'm thinking of dropping it to between 65 and 70.

mrblase, I'm the wrong person to ask a mathematical question. If it helps, I usually get 24 12-oz bottles from an LBK batch, and using the amount of Booster I've just referenced, maybe you'll be able to figure out how much per bottle.

The thing is, Booster doesn't dissolve very readily, so I don't know how good it would be for bottle priming.

TimeTraveler, head and carbonation are two different things, as far as I understand them. You won't get a good head on your beer without proper carbonation, that's for sure, so the two are related, but not dependent on each other. I've heard that fresh ingredients play an important part in head formation and retention, whether all grain or extract, and I believe I've gotten a better head, better retention and better lacing when I know the ingredients are fresh.

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Fedora Dave,

I've seen heads made with large bubbles and ones made with small bubbles. Usually, the heads made from large bubbles are on batches that were over primed and resulted in very bubbly soda-like carbonation. The finer bubbles are better. For example, the head on a Guiness is made from small bubbles (of course, it uses nitrogen, too - but that is the style of head I'm talking about). There is is one like the following that I made using Mr. Beer priming - notice the large bubbles in the head:


DrWhosNorthernEanglishBrown01.jpg[/attachment]

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