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Adding Oatmeal to my Mr. Beer Stout

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I am wondering if anyone has tried to add oatmeal to their Mr. Beer St. Patrick's day stout. I really want to experiment, and I love Oatmeal stout. Any suggestions? Thank you Mr. Beer community.

Is it a good idea?

How should I prepare the oatmeal?

How much oatmeal should I use in my wort?

:)

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Welcome aboard. You certainly can add some oatmeal to your stout if you like. I just realized Mr Beer doesn't carry an Oatmeal Stout at the moment. Maybe it's coming along.

Anyway, all you really need to do is steep some flaked oats in water for about 20 minutes. You'll want to use instant or 5 minute or even old-fashioned oats, as long as they're flaked. Don't use cut oats, use flaked oats. Perhaps 8 oz of oats in two quarts of water or 12 oz oats in 3 quarts water might do the trick, depending on your taste.

It's kinda like making tea. You can even put the oats in a paint strainer bag from Home depot. They have one gallon sizes, which would be good for this job. And they're reusable, too.

Then use that water to continue with your HME and then into your LBK.

Good luck, and hope to see you around more. Let us know how your oatmeal stout turns out.

BTW, whenever I steep oats like that by itself, after straining them out, I like to make a nice big bowl of oatmeal with it instead of throwing it away.

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VSB - I used the instant oats in a Sticky Wicket batch last year and it turned out good.

When I get the value pack of Oatmeal from Sams or Costco, all the flavored packages are eaten and I'm left with 8 bags of plain oatmeal (of course you get more plain than anything else). I used 4 packages and steeped at 155 degrees for 20 minutes then added the 2 HMEs for a Mr. Beer size batch.

I believe there are still quite a few of the Sticky Wickets left in the 'blow-out' sale (linked in another thread) at $5 per can. I got 4 to do a 5gal batch.

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Steel-cut oats from Ireland are sometimes called Irish oats whereas rolled oats are used in England. So when I make English Stout I used rolled oats and when I make Irish Stout I use Steel cut oats. I always put them on a large cutting board first then crush them with a rolling pin then I put them in a muslin bag. Make sure you leave enough room in the bag for the oats to expand or the bag will burst.

If I am making a small batch I use the Mr. Beer kit. I add 2 oz of oatmeal in a muslin bag to the water and simmer it for 25 minutes. Then I let it cool bring the water level back up take the muslin bag out and squeeze the liquid back into the pot. When cool I add booster bring it to a low boil then remove from heat. I then stir in my can of Mr. Beer, plus 9 oz of dark (LME) 1 tablespoon of brown sugar and 3 tablespoons of black strap molasses.

When I make a coffee stout I grind up the coffee beans and add them with the oatmeal in the muslin bag. I always use Mr. Beer kegs for my small batches for testing a new receipe. If I like it then I make a 5gal batch in my glass carboy's or in my 6.5 plastic ferminting bucket. Experiment that is what it is all about. I am a third generation home brewer My grandfather and father made their beer in ceramic crocks and used bleach and the oven to sterilize so their are really no set rules to brewing except one "SANTIZE EVERYTHING"

I use flip top bottles Grolsch etc. for bottling all my beer. I prefer the smaller 5L Party Kegs over the large korny kegs which I have but seldom use anymore because I now prefer to make smaller batches of many different types of beer rather than 5 gals of one type of beer but I do make 5gal batches when I find a recipe I really like.

Remember it is what ever you like to brew and how you like to do it. Start small first and experiment that is what it is all about!

This is my standard 5 gal batch of English Stout but I prefer Irish Stout
8 pounds, British amber extract (I use dark for Irish Stout)
1/2 pound, black patent malt
1/2 pound, roasted barley
1/2 pound, chocolate malt
1 pound, steel cut oats
2 ounces, Eroica hops (boil)
1 ounce, Fuggles hops (finish)
Whitbread ale yeast
1/2 cup, corn sugar (priming)

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Steel-cut oats from Ireland are sometimes called Irish oats whereas rolled oats are used in England. So when I make English Stout I used rolled oats and when I make Irish Stout I use Steel cut oats. I always put them on a large cutting board first then crush them with a rolling pin then I put them in a muslin bag. Make sure you leave enough room in the bag for the oats to expand or the bag will burst.

If I am making a small batch I use the Mr. Beer kit. I add 2 oz of oatmeal in a muslin bag to the water and simmer it for 25 minutes. Then I let it cool bring the water level back up take the muslin bag out and squeeze the liquid back into the pot. When cool I add booster bring it to a low boil then remove from heat. I then stir in my can of Mr. Beer, plus 9 oz of dark (LME) 1 tablespoon of brown sugar and 3 tablespoons of black strap molasses.

When I make a coffee stout I grind up the coffee beans and add them with the oatmeal in the muslin bag. I always use Mr. Beer kegs for my small batches for testing a new receipe. If I like it then I make a 5gal batch in my glass carboy's or in my 6.5 plastic ferminting bucket. Experiment that is what it is all about. I am a third generation home brewer My grandfather and father made their beer in ceramic crocks and used bleach and the oven to sterilize so their are really no set rules to brewing except one "SANTIZE EVERYTHING"

I use flip top bottles Grolsch etc. for bottling all my beer. I prefer the smaller 5L Party Kegs over the large korny kegs which I have but seldom use anymore because I now prefer to make smaller batches of many different types of beer rather than 5 gals of one type of beer but I do make 5gal batches when I find a recipe I really like.

Remember it is what ever you like to brew and how you like to do it. Start small first and experiment that is what it is all about!

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FWIW - I know people steep oats and report good results; but be aware that steeping them will only extract unfermentable starches, and no sugars. Oats have no diastatic power, and have to be mashed with a base malt to convert starches to fermentable sugars.

Having unfermentable starches in your wort will do two things: it will add to the mouthfeel (good); and it makes the wort more susceptible to an infection, since bacteria loves the starch, and yeast will not compete for it (bad).

If you are dead-set on using oats in an extract batch, you should toast them in the oven at 300-350F for 20-30 min, mixing frequently, until they are golden in color. This way you get more flavor out of them.

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welcome aboard!I just recently brewed a sticky wicket oatmeal stout. i will use this advice on my next stout!Good luck!enjoy brewing :cheers:

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I always make my Stouts with toasted oats... better taste, smoother mouthfeel, easy to do.

Get some quaker oats in the old round container, spread some out across a baking sheet and throw in oven at 350 for like 5 minutes, keep an eye on them, you want them to slightly brown but they'll burn quick at that heat.

boil them in a hop bag or something in your 4ish cups of water for 10 minutes, THEN SQUEEZE OUT THE BAG INTO THE WATER before you discard it, carry on with making the beer as normal.

oats1.jpg

oats.jpg

visual guide

ToastedOats.jpg

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