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PaJim

Stouts

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I like my dark beers, I have made some stouts and porters how do I go about getting that mouth feel you get from Guinness or Murphy's I miss that.

Thanks for your time, Jim

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I hope this is helpful. I pulled this info from an old issue of BYO...

Higher mash temperatures (low fermentability/high dextrin content) generally yield a fuller bodied beer in the end, and lower mash temperatures (high fermentability/low dextrin content) generally yield a drier and thinner beer. The way we manipulate what happens in the mash tun can help us in our endeavor too. Our goal for building body and mouthfeel is a thick mash. A thin mash increases the proportion of maltose, which will lead to greater attenuation (and a thinner body).

When thinking of boosting body and mouthfeel on a particular beer, start with the yeast. This may sound like we are starting at the wrong end of the brew day, but it is the yeast’s ability to ferment that will largely determine the body and mouthfeel left behind in that brew. This ability is measured by attenuation.

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I should be more clear I am still doing Mr. Beer type recipes. I have steeped grains and some hop boils. Any thoughts would be helpful.

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Perhaps lactose is what you are looking for regarding mouthfeel. Lactose is not fermentable by yeast, and it will give your beer a milky mouthfeel. Lactose is often added to stouts to increase the body of the beer, and give it a creamy mouth feel.

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You can start by adding some Flaked barley and Carapils to your steeping grains. I would use .25# of 2-row, .25# Flaked Barley, .25# Carapils and bring some water up to about 160 degrees. The 2 row will give the grains a little added boost for extraction and converting. Its basically a very mini mash. Drop those grains in for about 30 minutes and add that to the boil pot than start your hop boil. That will help quite a bit. Until you get in to mashing grains and temperature control it can be difficult to really replicate the mouth feel your looking for.

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I think most of the mouth feel you get is from the nitrogen in the draft pour. When those bubbles are gone, let a murphy's or guiness sit around for a bit, the beers are pretty thin.

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My stout is about finished, and boy it's got that mouth feel.
Finished at 1.036 so that's probably got something to do with it.
Anyways, it was an extract kit with specialty steeping.
Here's the recipe from Northern Brewer:

KIT INVENTORY:
SPECIALTY GRAIN
- 0.5 lbs English Roasted Barley
- 0.5 lbs English Black Malt
- 0.5 lbs English Chocolate Malt
FERMENTABLES
- 6 lbs Dark malt syrup (60 min)
- 6 lbs Dark malt syrup late addition (15 min)
HOPS & FLAVORINGS
- 2 oz Summit (use 1.75 oz only at 60 min)
- 2 oz Cascade (0 min)
YEAST
- Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale. Apparent attenuation: 69–73%. Floc-
culation: high. Optimum temp: 55°-70° F.
- Dry Yeast Alternative: Safale S-04 Ale Yeast. Optimum temp: 64°-75° F
I steeped at 165 for 30 minutes, I didn't follow the directions on letting it warm to 170 or for 20 minutes.
Also, I made 4.5 gallons with it, not 5, I wanted it to be thicker.

OG came to 1.101, man it's tasting awesome right now too.

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"D Rabbit" post=298068 said:

You can start by adding some Flaked barley and Carapils to your steeping grains. I would use .25# of 2-row, .25# Flaked Barley, .25# Carapils and bring some water up to about 160 degrees. The 2 row will give the grains a little added boost for extraction and converting. Its basically a very mini mash. Drop those grains in for about 30 minutes and add that to the boil pot than start your hop boil. That will help quite a bit. Until you get in to mashing grains and temperature control it can be difficult to really replicate the mouth feel your looking for.

+1 to what Rabbit is saying. These steeping grains are going to help alot. You can also use oatmeal as well, IMHO it really helps boost the mouthfeel of the brew. I like to toast my oats a little bit before I use them. Nothing like a nice thick Oatmeal stout on a winter day!!!

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"hilkertj" post=298058 said:

Perhaps lactose is what you are looking for regarding mouthfeel. Lactose is not fermentable by yeast, and it will give your beer a milky mouthfeel. Lactose is often added to stouts to increase the body of the beer, and give it a creamy mouth feel.

I am looking into doing a St. Patrick's Irish Stout Deluxe Refill. How much should I add to a Mr. Beer size batch and when?

Thanks for your time, Jim

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+1 to Drabbit and K9... I've made 5 or 6 stouts and using oatmeal gave me the best result. BUT, I'm still playing around and experimenting.

To the suggestion of lactose, does that affect the flavor at all?

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"TimeTraveler" post=298207 said:

How much lactose do you normally add to a Mr. B stout batch?

Depends on the recipe, for most stouts around 1/2 lb, but I have added up to 3/4 lb to one that was heavy on roasted barley.

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FWIW, you can use Maltodextrin and get a similar affect as lactose without the extra sweetness.

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+1 to maltodextrin it will add some nice body for you without altering the flavor.

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"TimeTraveler" post=298225 said:

Thanks, I was thinking of adding lactose, since I have some, to the new Mr. Bs St. Patrick stout along with some cocoa.

I think this will be tasty. That new stouts bitterness level is a bit over the top, so the lactose will help and the cocoa will be nice. I might do this and add some malt too when I brew mine.

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I devoted an entire post to brewing my favorite stout recipe a little over a year ago including my all grain recipe for my Snowy Daze Stout. The recipe is fairly simple using 2 Row, Roasted Barley, Crystal 20L and some Chocolate malt with an option of adding a tablespoon of pure vanilla extract at bottling to bring out the chocolate flavors.


I found that limiting the number of dark grains to just two and keeping their percentages low lets the roasted barley flavors come through with just enough chocolate. This recipe is a regular in my cold weather lineup and it's best brewed on a cold day to appreciate the strong roasted coffee aromas that fill the brewroom and warm your senses.

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I have my stout in the LBK can I add the lactose when i bottle, it if so can I mix it in with my priming sugar?

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"PaJim" post=298332 said:

I have my stout in the LBK can I add the lactose when i bottle, it if so can I mix it in with my priming sugar?

Most definately!! Just add in to the same boiling water you add the priming sugar to. You might want to use a little more water, but other than that it'll be no problem.

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Screwy, in the Snowy Daze Stout, when bottling, why do you invert bottle twice before capping? I see you batch prime.

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"mtsoxfan" post=298355 said:

Screwy, in the Snowy Daze Stout, when bottling, why do you invert bottle twice before capping? I see you batch prime.

mtsoxfan it's just something I did there for a while, the bubbles from the residual Co2 in the beer I thought would cause the beer to foam and help purge any oxygen from the bottles headspace.

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